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Barbara Russell

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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 13, 2001
A Columbia Council meeting scheduled for last night was canceled after only four of the 10 members showed up. Six members are required for a quorum. Chairman Lanny Morrison of Harper's Choice, Vincent Marando of Wilde Lake, Kirk Halpin of Kings Contrivance and Cecilia Januszkiewicz of Long Reach were present. Barbara Russell of Oakland Mills was expected to arrive late.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson | June 21, 2009
Developers hoping to build a Walgreens pharmacy off Route 175 at Thunder Hill Road in Columbia won approval for their plan from a county hearing examiner Tuesday. The 25-page decision reversed an April rejection of the plan by the county Planning Board. Michele L. LeFaivre, the hearing examiner, ruled that the State Highway Administration and county traffic and planning officials showed convincingly that access to the site, where a former bank building has sat empty for years, would be safe.
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NEWS
April 3, 2005
THE QUESTION Who was Columbia's first baby? THE ANSWER On Sept. 13, 1967, Barbara Russell gave birth to Charles Russell III. A biracial baby (Barbara is white and her then-husband, Charles, is black), the infant was a symbol of Columbia founder James W. Rouse's vision of a community where people of different races and backgrounds would live. Barbara still lives in the community and is vice chair of the Columbia Council.
NEWS
January 18, 2008
`Choose Civility' magnets available The Howard County Library has "Choose Civility" car magnets in stock. The magnets are part of an initiative that includes 40 partners, led by the library, to position Howard County as a model of civility. The project - funded by Friends of Howard County Library, The Horizon Foundation and Howard County General Hospital - is intended to enhance the quality of life in the county and emphasize the importance of civility for those who live and work here.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
The two candidates for the Harper's Choice seat on the Columbia Council -- who ran against each other two years ago -- got their first chance last night to make their campaign pitch to the public. Tom Forno, the incumbent, presented his candidacy as a call for the Columbia Association to "shift gears" and become a more "mature" organization. Although he did not present his bid as a defense of Deborah O. McCarty, he did support the embattled CA president. Incumbent: Tom Forno Challenger: Lanny Morrison Information: 410-730-3888 Hickory Ridge Incumbent: Jean S. Friedberg Jr. Challenger: Miles Coffman Information: 410-730-7327 Oakland Mills Incumbent: Earl Jones Challenger: Barbara Russell Information: 410-730-4610 Owen Brown (no election)
NEWS
July 16, 2001
IT WAS ONLY a year ago that the quarrelsome Columbia Council was thinking about cuts in some programs in the midst of operating losses. Now the board, which sets policy for Columbia's health clubs, pools, golf courses and once-embattled horse center, sits on a $3.8 million budget surplus. The community's debt has shrunk from more than $90 million several years ago to about $28 million. On paper, things look good. But it's not clear that residents are satisfied or that their priorities are reflected in the spending plan.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | June 21, 2009
Developers hoping to build a Walgreens pharmacy off Route 175 at Thunder Hill Road in Columbia won approval for their plan from a county hearing examiner Tuesday. The 25-page decision reversed an April rejection of the plan by the county Planning Board. Michele L. LeFaivre, the hearing examiner, ruled that the State Highway Administration and county traffic and planning officials showed convincingly that access to the site, where a former bank building has sat empty for years, would be safe.
NEWS
August 9, 2006
Cuts Against Cancer to be held Aug. 20 The 10th Cuts Against Cancer will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 20 at Rafet's Hairmasters International Salon in The Mall in Columbia. Proceeds from the reduced- price services -- haircuts for $25 ($40 with blow dry), manicures, waxing and seated massages -- will go to the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource and Image Center in Columbia. A silent auction that features trips to Ocean City, New York and Turkey, food and wine merchants and local art, also are planned.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | March 11, 2001
BEFORE HE won a seat on the Columbia Council, Lanny Morrison lamented the council's propensity to meet in private. As council chairman, he operates as if he were the council's minister of closed doors. He says he's doing his best with a council that has little interest in collegial decision-making, but his detractors say he arrogates power to himself -- and withholds information critical to their decision-making. "Lanny Morrison has bent over backward to provide information," said Pearl Atkinson-Stewart.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
When Barbara and Charles Russell wanted to get married in 1966, they had to go to Washington because interracial marriages were not legal in Maryland. As a white woman and a black man, they worried about finding a company that would rent an apartment to them in the state. Friends warned them that finding housing would be difficult. The only information a lawyer could offer was that he had not heard of interracial couples being arrested in Maryland for living together. In the summer of 1967, the Russells stopped by Bryant Gardens apartments in the new community of Columbia and were shocked when a rental agent asked whether they wanted to live there.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
THE QUESTION Who was Columbia's first baby? THE ANSWER On Sept. 13, 1967, Barbara Russell gave birth to Charles Russell III. A biracial baby (Barbara is white and her then-husband, Charles, is black), the infant was a symbol of Columbia founder James W. Rouse's vision of a community where people of different races and backgrounds would live. Barbara still lives in the community and is vice chair of the Columbia Council.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2004
The Columbia Association board of directors is trying to shed its reputation for bickering, but only weeks after village elections the group is arguing about guidelines limiting public speech. After an annual legal briefing with lawyers from Whiteford, Taylor and Preston, the directors cannot agree on whether they were advised to - or should - withhold publicly expressing their views on an issue before the board discusses it. The disagreement comes after the elections produced a new board majority that favors more openness from the 10-member group, which also acts as the Columbia Council.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
When Barbara and Charles Russell wanted to get married in 1966, they had to go to Washington because interracial marriages were not legal in Maryland. As a white woman and a black man, they worried about finding a company that would rent an apartment to them in the state. Friends warned them that finding housing would be difficult. The only information a lawyer could offer was that he had not heard of interracial couples being arrested in Maryland for living together. In the summer of 1967, the Russells stopped by Bryant Gardens apartments in the new community of Columbia and were shocked when a rental agent asked whether they wanted to live there.
NEWS
July 16, 2001
IT WAS ONLY a year ago that the quarrelsome Columbia Council was thinking about cuts in some programs in the midst of operating losses. Now the board, which sets policy for Columbia's health clubs, pools, golf courses and once-embattled horse center, sits on a $3.8 million budget surplus. The community's debt has shrunk from more than $90 million several years ago to about $28 million. On paper, things look good. But it's not clear that residents are satisfied or that their priorities are reflected in the spending plan.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 13, 2001
A Columbia Council meeting scheduled for last night was canceled after only four of the 10 members showed up. Six members are required for a quorum. Chairman Lanny Morrison of Harper's Choice, Vincent Marando of Wilde Lake, Kirk Halpin of Kings Contrivance and Cecilia Januszkiewicz of Long Reach were present. Barbara Russell of Oakland Mills was expected to arrive late.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | March 11, 2001
BEFORE HE won a seat on the Columbia Council, Lanny Morrison lamented the council's propensity to meet in private. As council chairman, he operates as if he were the council's minister of closed doors. He says he's doing his best with a council that has little interest in collegial decision-making, but his detractors say he arrogates power to himself -- and withholds information critical to their decision-making. "Lanny Morrison has bent over backward to provide information," said Pearl Atkinson-Stewart.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2004
The Columbia Association board of directors is trying to shed its reputation for bickering, but only weeks after village elections the group is arguing about guidelines limiting public speech. After an annual legal briefing with lawyers from Whiteford, Taylor and Preston, the directors cannot agree on whether they were advised to - or should - withhold publicly expressing their views on an issue before the board discusses it. The disagreement comes after the elections produced a new board majority that favors more openness from the 10-member group, which also acts as the Columbia Council.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2000
For the second day, Columbia Association President Deborah O. McCarty fielded questions from residents yesterday, accepting a share of the blame for poor communication but saying that structural governance issues are at the root of problems in Howard County's planned community. McCarty said one benefit of the recent controversy over her leadership and commitment is the "reinvolvement" of residents who had become less active in the community over the years. McCarty also accused some Columbia Council members of violating their fiduciary responsibility as board members by disclosing confidential information.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
An unusually low turnout - even for Columbia - last night hampered the Columbia Council's first effort to get public input on its nationwide search for a new leader. A public forum on the search for a replacement for former Columbia Association President Deborah O. McCarty drew about a dozen residents, and fewer suggestions than that as to how the 10-member board should handle what are the biggest issues on its plate. Wolfger Schneider, one of two residents who signed up to speak at Kahler Hall, said the new president should not be a "high profiler" who has ambitions of climbing the corporate ladder, but rather should be someone who is focused on preserving Columbia's amenities and reducing its debt.
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