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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 22, 2001
If our gardens are reflections of ourselves, then Barbara Mertz is a woman of mystery, a bit wild, with a quirky sense of humor, a fascination with the past, and little or no interest in calm vistas and orderly beauty. But that won't come as any surprise to anyone who knows what she does for a living. Barbara Mertz, under the pen names Elizabeth Peters and Barbara Michaels, is the best-selling author of 59 mysteries. Lord of the Silent, published this spring, is the latest in a series about the adventures of Amelia Peabody, a 19th-century Egyptologist.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 22, 2001
If our gardens are reflections of ourselves, then Barbara Mertz is a woman of mystery, a bit wild, with a quirky sense of humor, a fascination with the past, and little or no interest in calm vistas and orderly beauty. But that won't come as any surprise to anyone who knows what she does for a living. Barbara Mertz, under the pen names Elizabeth Peters and Barbara Michaels, is the best-selling author of 59 mysteries. Lord of the Silent, published this spring, is the latest in a series about the adventures of Amelia Peabody, a 19th-century Egyptologist.
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1998
In the solarium of a 19th-century mansion hidden deep in the Maryland countryside, best-selling mystery writer Barbara Mertz is sweet-talking her six cats and beguiling visitors with tales of a truly astonishing career.Tomorrow night, in New York City, the Frederick writer will receive the grandmaster lifetime achievement award from the Mystery Writers of America, the ultimate award from the ultimate mystery writers group.This engaging, chatty woman, who feeds cake to a cat as she lights another cigarette, has written close to 60 books and brought a feminist sensibility to her genre.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1998
In the solarium of a 19th-century mansion hidden deep in the Maryland countryside, best-selling mystery writer Barbara Mertz is sweet-talking her six cats and beguiling visitors with tales of a truly astonishing career.Tomorrow night, in New York City, the Frederick writer will receive the grandmaster lifetime achievement award from the Mystery Writers of America, the ultimate award from the ultimate mystery writers group.This engaging, chatty woman, who feeds cake to a cat as she lights another cigarette, has written close to 60 books and brought a feminist sensibility to her genre.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | September 1, 1991
Amelia Peabody Emerson and Barbara Mertz have a lot in common.The dauntless Victorian archaeologist and the popular Maryland novelist are outspoken and articulate, and hardly shy about expressing opinions. Both are awesomely well-educated. Both are, as might be expected, passionate feminists, and both are blessed with a wry sense of humor. But the 20th century author, like the 19th century Egyptologist, is at home in feather-decked picture hats as well as pith helmets, and can preside with style over tea in the most refined of rose-patterned drawing rooms.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1996
Barbara Mertz years ago created Amelia Peabody. Married to an irascible archaeologist ("the father of curses," to his workmen), Amelia was in her 20s and it was about 1880. The pair went up the Nile and into hieroglyphics. Since then, real-life Egyptology has made much progress; Amelia too.In "The Hippopotamus Pool" (Warner. 384 pages. $22.95), the time is 1900, the locale a mile or so east of the Valley of Kings - where nowadays the Egyptologist Kent R. Weeks explores Kings' Valley Tomb No. 5, the mausoleum for 50 of the sons of Rameses II. Last December, Barbara Mertz of Frederick had a hot, humid, dusty tour inside KV-5, guided by her old friend Mr. Weeks.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | December 22, 1991
For some people, cooking is murder.From the leg of lamb used as a murder weapon to the traces of arsenic in the elderberry wine, food has often played a role in literary mayhem. So when a group of mystery writers collaborates on a cookbook, you'd better believe their prose has little in common with Betty Crocker's.Poring through "Cooking With Malice Domestic," a cookbook devised by Jean and Ron McMillen, owners of Mystery Bookshop: Bethesda, readers will come across such evocative directions as "beat to death," "flay and dismember half a small chicken" and "crack those eggs -- show no mercy."
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1997
"It's not so easy to do culinary mysteries," a writer sighs over dinner. "I mean, you just can't poison someone every time."Welcome to Malice Domestic, a cozy gathering, if not necessarily a gathering for cozies. (We'll explain that distinction by and by). A fixture at the Bethesda Hyatt for eight of its nine years, Malice Domestic, a celebration of traditional mysteries, held its last conference there over the weekend and will move next year to downtown Washington.The move will come because Malice, which started with 300-some paid attendees in 1989, now attracts more mystery fans, writers, would-be writers, publishers and agents than the Hyatt can hold.
NEWS
By James H. Bready Binnie Syril Braunstein and Mark Owings contributed to this listing | January 1, 1995
Bong! The stroke of midnight, the end of 1994. Best wishes to the year's new or repeat Maryland authors, and to those $H anywhere who wrote about Maryland, all for the general reader. So now, the 41st annual listing -- apologies to anyone overlooked or out-spaced (addendum at month's end).Fiction: From Maryland's three best-seller suspense artists came chronologically) "Debt of Honor," by Tom Clancy; Stephen Hunter's "Dirty White Boys"; and "Night Train to Memphis" by Barbara Mertz (as Elizabeth Peters)
NEWS
By James H. Bready | January 2, 1994
Amid all the fuss about reading, let's salute those Marylanders who in 1993 had something to say to the general reader, and those authors, wherever based, who wrote about Maryland.Here's the annual census. Some worthy book will doubtless fall off the table -- to be picked up apologetically in a subsequent addendum.FictionFrom Maryland's three large-audience suspense masters came (chronologically) "Point of Impact," by Stephen Hunter; Tom Clancy's "Without Remorse" and "Houses of Stone," by Barbara Mertz (as Barbara Michaels)
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1997
"It's not so easy to do culinary mysteries," a writer sighs over dinner. "I mean, you just can't poison someone every time."Welcome to Malice Domestic, a cozy gathering, if not necessarily a gathering for cozies. (We'll explain that distinction by and by). A fixture at the Bethesda Hyatt for eight of its nine years, Malice Domestic, a celebration of traditional mysteries, held its last conference there over the weekend and will move next year to downtown Washington.The move will come because Malice, which started with 300-some paid attendees in 1989, now attracts more mystery fans, writers, would-be writers, publishers and agents than the Hyatt can hold.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1996
Barbara Mertz years ago created Amelia Peabody. Married to an irascible archaeologist ("the father of curses," to his workmen), Amelia was in her 20s and it was about 1880. The pair went up the Nile and into hieroglyphics. Since then, real-life Egyptology has made much progress; Amelia too.In "The Hippopotamus Pool" (Warner. 384 pages. $22.95), the time is 1900, the locale a mile or so east of the Valley of Kings - where nowadays the Egyptologist Kent R. Weeks explores Kings' Valley Tomb No. 5, the mausoleum for 50 of the sons of Rameses II. Last December, Barbara Mertz of Frederick had a hot, humid, dusty tour inside KV-5, guided by her old friend Mr. Weeks.
NEWS
By James H. Bready Binnie Syril Braunstein and Mark Owings contributed to this listing | January 1, 1995
Bong! The stroke of midnight, the end of 1994. Best wishes to the year's new or repeat Maryland authors, and to those $H anywhere who wrote about Maryland, all for the general reader. So now, the 41st annual listing -- apologies to anyone overlooked or out-spaced (addendum at month's end).Fiction: From Maryland's three best-seller suspense artists came chronologically) "Debt of Honor," by Tom Clancy; Stephen Hunter's "Dirty White Boys"; and "Night Train to Memphis" by Barbara Mertz (as Elizabeth Peters)
NEWS
By James H. Bready | January 2, 1994
Amid all the fuss about reading, let's salute those Marylanders who in 1993 had something to say to the general reader, and those authors, wherever based, who wrote about Maryland.Here's the annual census. Some worthy book will doubtless fall off the table -- to be picked up apologetically in a subsequent addendum.FictionFrom Maryland's three large-audience suspense masters came (chronologically) "Point of Impact," by Stephen Hunter; Tom Clancy's "Without Remorse" and "Houses of Stone," by Barbara Mertz (as Barbara Michaels)
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | December 22, 1991
For some people, cooking is murder.From the leg of lamb used as a murder weapon to the traces of arsenic in the elderberry wine, food has often played a role in literary mayhem. So when a group of mystery writers collaborates on a cookbook, you'd better believe their prose has little in common with Betty Crocker's.Poring through "Cooking With Malice Domestic," a cookbook devised by Jean and Ron McMillen, owners of Mystery Bookshop: Bethesda, readers will come across such evocative directions as "beat to death," "flay and dismember half a small chicken" and "crack those eggs -- show no mercy."
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | September 1, 1991
Amelia Peabody Emerson and Barbara Mertz have a lot in common.The dauntless Victorian archaeologist and the popular Maryland novelist are outspoken and articulate, and hardly shy about expressing opinions. Both are awesomely well-educated. Both are, as might be expected, passionate feminists, and both are blessed with a wry sense of humor. But the 20th century author, like the 19th century Egyptologist, is at home in feather-decked picture hats as well as pith helmets, and can preside with style over tea in the most refined of rose-patterned drawing rooms.
FEATURES
September 12, 1991
Mystery writer Barbara Mertz of Frederick has donated $100,000 to Hood College to set up a scholarship fund for minority students interested in pursuing a mystery writing career."
FEATURES
May 4, 1999
"Butchers Hill," by Sun features writer Laura Lippman, was named winner of the Agatha Award for best traditional mystery novel of 1998 at Malice Domestic, an annual national mystery convention in Washington.The Agatha, named for mystery writer Agatha Christie, is the third major mystery award for Lippman."Charm City," an earlier book in her series featuring Baltimore-based private detective Tess Monaghan, won the mystery trade's Edgar and Shamus awards. Lippman has been a reporter at The Sun since 1989.
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