Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBarbara Hershey
IN THE NEWS

Barbara Hershey

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 25, 1998
As filmgoers brace for yet another spate of movies dealing with families in varying degrees of dysfunction and pathology, "A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries" offers the radical idea that flawed people can still be good parents.What's more, it announces an exciting new talent in Leelee Sobieski, who carries this delicately modulated film withcomposure, grace and startling honesty."A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries" is based on Kaylie Jones' autobiographical novel, which chronicles her early life as the daughter of the novelist James Jones ("From Here to Eternity," "The Thin Red Line")
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Over the course of 24 years, Signature Theatre has given 42 premieres, 18 of them musicals. This commitment to new work cannot be praised enough, even if it's hard to summon much enthusiasm for the 18th of those musicals, "Beaches. "  This piece is based on the Iris Rainer Dart novel about an unlikely, decades-long friendship between two women from opposite worlds. That story is best known for inspiring the 1988 movie starring Bette Midler as Cee Cee, a brash singing actress destined for the big time; and Barbara Hershey , her moneyed, tender, overly manicured friend, who learns how to really live just in time to get a fatal disease.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Caryn James and Caryn James,New York Times News Service | September 11, 1995
A few weeks ago at a local cineplex, this preview popped up: Tom Berenger was riding through the woods on horseback spatting with Barbara Hershey. Indians appeared out of the mist, which caused Ms. Hershey's character to react with reverential wonder. The title "Last of the Dogmen" appeared, which caused the audience to react with derisive laughter.It's a goofy title, all right, especially if you don't know that dogmen is another term for the Indian warriors called dog soldiers. While the preview made the movie seem silly and unwatchable, "Last of the Dogmen" turns out to be an earnest, picturesque adventure that is perfectly watchable, though not much more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 3, 2002
Movie audiences knew Anthony LaPaglia as the funny, courtly Mafioso in Betsy's Wedding (1990) or the menacing mobster Barry "the Blade" Muldano in The Client (1994). TV audiences knew him as an intense L.A. lawyer in Murder One (1996-7) or as Simon Moon in Frasier. And theater audiences knew him as troubled Brooklyn dockworker Eddie Carbone in an acclaimed revival of Arthur Miller's A View from the Bridge, for which he won a Tony Award in 1998. From now on, he will be known for Lantana.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 2, 1990
"Tune In Tomorrow" is the real enemy.Critics have been beating snare drums all summer about empty, shallow, pointless studio pictures and how they're driving smaller, more unique films out of the marketplace. But here's "Tune In Tomorrow," with its cosmopolitan heritage -- adapted by a British novelist from a famous Peruvian novel and filmed by a BBC director in New Orleans -- that's small and unique. But it's also empty, shallow and pointless.It's one of those ornate literary conceits that must have been a great read on the typed page, but it's so overplayed, so bombastic, so freighted with meaningless incident, purple rhetoric and preciously bad comedy, that it's like being mugged by dwarfs in an alley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | August 23, 1991
Thrillers make us think, "How can she be stupid enough to walk into that room alone -- hasn't she ever seen a movie!" Martin Campbell's "Defenseless" isn't good enough to keep us from asking such questions, but it's scary enough to make us forget them almost as soon as they come to mind."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
Kidding soap opera is always a risky undertaking. It's difficult to parody an art form that wallows in self-parody. ''Tune in Tomorrow'' almost manages to overcome this hurdle. The opening 45 minutes are uneventful, but the second half of the film has an abundance of laughs.Peter Falk stars. He plays a soap writer who joins a radio station in 1951 New Orleans. Keanu Reeves is Martin, the young news writer at the station. Barbara Hershey is the 36-year-old woman who is twice divorced and is back home to find a third husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 16, 1992
The photographer known as Weegee -- Arthur Fellig, by actual name -- was a city rat with a Speed Graphic camera who roamed the streets of New York in the hours after midnight. With a mini-darkroom custom built in the trunk of his car and a police radio to guide him like a North Star of the demimonde, he wandered from atrocity to atrocity, snapping dazzlingly immediate shots of life and death, urban style, '40s-style. You've seen his brash, flash-blasted pix a million times and not known it: the hood with his head tilted back, his ruined face spewing rivers of blood behind a bullet-starred windshield; the screaming survivor of a fire that is consuming her children in a blazing tenement; the sailor grabbing a kiss from a pretty gal outside a U.S.O club.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 17, 1997
"The Portrait of a Lady," alas, is a still-life without figures.An opulent feminist re-reading of the Henry James novel, it has all the hallmarks of serious work, but it's so infuriatingly slow-moving and stilted, and the motives and relationships of its characters remain so obscure, that the thing becomes an ordeal by costume and arch dialogue.There are deeper issues, however. Is Isabel Archer, the headstrong American girl whose quest for intellectual and emotional freedom leads to pain, a feminist character or not?
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 1, 1993
Dan Rodricks is on vacation. His column will resume when he returns.April Fool!Man goes to the automatic teller machine in a Giant. He asks for $60 from his checking account. Eighty dollars drops out of the machine. The printed receipt indicates the man's account has been debited only the $60 he requested. He reports this at the courtesy booth. He's told to "Check with your bank."Right. The bank. The bank that charges $25 each time the man's checking account is overdrawn by a buck-fifty. The bank that charges 50 cents for a telephone transfer from savings to checking.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 25, 1998
As filmgoers brace for yet another spate of movies dealing with families in varying degrees of dysfunction and pathology, "A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries" offers the radical idea that flawed people can still be good parents.What's more, it announces an exciting new talent in Leelee Sobieski, who carries this delicately modulated film withcomposure, grace and startling honesty."A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries" is based on Kaylie Jones' autobiographical novel, which chronicles her early life as the daughter of the novelist James Jones ("From Here to Eternity," "The Thin Red Line")
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 17, 1997
"The Portrait of a Lady," alas, is a still-life without figures.An opulent feminist re-reading of the Henry James novel, it has all the hallmarks of serious work, but it's so infuriatingly slow-moving and stilted, and the motives and relationships of its characters remain so obscure, that the thing becomes an ordeal by costume and arch dialogue.There are deeper issues, however. Is Isabel Archer, the headstrong American girl whose quest for intellectual and emotional freedom leads to pain, a feminist character or not?
FEATURES
By Caryn James and Caryn James,New York Times News Service | September 11, 1995
A few weeks ago at a local cineplex, this preview popped up: Tom Berenger was riding through the woods on horseback spatting with Barbara Hershey. Indians appeared out of the mist, which caused Ms. Hershey's character to react with reverential wonder. The title "Last of the Dogmen" appeared, which caused the audience to react with derisive laughter.It's a goofy title, all right, especially if you don't know that dogmen is another term for the Indian warriors called dog soldiers. While the preview made the movie seem silly and unwatchable, "Last of the Dogmen" turns out to be an earnest, picturesque adventure that is perfectly watchable, though not much more.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 16, 1993
Los Angeles -- Cable TV is offering an answer this week to anyone asking "What are you going to program on all those channels when there are 500 of them?"One answer is movies, movies and more movies -- original, made-for-TV movies, many of them targeted at audiences overlooked by feature filmmakers.The number of films and the array of talent presented by the cable industry to promote the films have reached an all-time high. And it's going to climb much higher, cable executives say.In one 24-hour period here this week, the roster of talent holding forth at press conferences and interview sessions on films headed for the small screen in coming months included:Jack Lemmon, Tom Hanks, Isabella Rossellini, Rosanna Arquette, John Lithgow, Sydney Pollack, John Carpenter, Shelley Long, Kiefer Sutherland, Matthew Broderick, Timothy Dalton, Daryl Hannah, Lily Tomlin, Forest Whitaker and Matthew Modine.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 1, 1993
Dan Rodricks is on vacation. His column will resume when he returns.April Fool!Man goes to the automatic teller machine in a Giant. He asks for $60 from his checking account. Eighty dollars drops out of the machine. The printed receipt indicates the man's account has been debited only the $60 he requested. He reports this at the courtesy booth. He's told to "Check with your bank."Right. The bank. The bank that charges $25 each time the man's checking account is overdrawn by a buck-fifty. The bank that charges 50 cents for a telephone transfer from savings to checking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 16, 1992
The photographer known as Weegee -- Arthur Fellig, by actual name -- was a city rat with a Speed Graphic camera who roamed the streets of New York in the hours after midnight. With a mini-darkroom custom built in the trunk of his car and a police radio to guide him like a North Star of the demimonde, he wandered from atrocity to atrocity, snapping dazzlingly immediate shots of life and death, urban style, '40s-style. You've seen his brash, flash-blasted pix a million times and not known it: the hood with his head tilted back, his ruined face spewing rivers of blood behind a bullet-starred windshield; the screaming survivor of a fire that is consuming her children in a blazing tenement; the sailor grabbing a kiss from a pretty gal outside a U.S.O club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Over the course of 24 years, Signature Theatre has given 42 premieres, 18 of them musicals. This commitment to new work cannot be praised enough, even if it's hard to summon much enthusiasm for the 18th of those musicals, "Beaches. "  This piece is based on the Iris Rainer Dart novel about an unlikely, decades-long friendship between two women from opposite worlds. That story is best known for inspiring the 1988 movie starring Bette Midler as Cee Cee, a brash singing actress destined for the big time; and Barbara Hershey , her moneyed, tender, overly manicured friend, who learns how to really live just in time to get a fatal disease.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 16, 1993
Los Angeles -- Cable TV is offering an answer this week to anyone asking "What are you going to program on all those channels when there are 500 of them?"One answer is movies, movies and more movies -- original, made-for-TV movies, many of them targeted at audiences overlooked by feature filmmakers.The number of films and the array of talent presented by the cable industry to promote the films have reached an all-time high. And it's going to climb much higher, cable executives say.In one 24-hour period here this week, the roster of talent holding forth at press conferences and interview sessions on films headed for the small screen in coming months included:Jack Lemmon, Tom Hanks, Isabella Rossellini, Rosanna Arquette, John Lithgow, Sydney Pollack, John Carpenter, Shelley Long, Kiefer Sutherland, Matthew Broderick, Timothy Dalton, Daryl Hannah, Lily Tomlin, Forest Whitaker and Matthew Modine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | August 23, 1991
Thrillers make us think, "How can she be stupid enough to walk into that room alone -- hasn't she ever seen a movie!" Martin Campbell's "Defenseless" isn't good enough to keep us from asking such questions, but it's scary enough to make us forget them almost as soon as they come to mind."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
Kidding soap opera is always a risky undertaking. It's difficult to parody an art form that wallows in self-parody. ''Tune in Tomorrow'' almost manages to overcome this hurdle. The opening 45 minutes are uneventful, but the second half of the film has an abundance of laughs.Peter Falk stars. He plays a soap writer who joins a radio station in 1951 New Orleans. Keanu Reeves is Martin, the young news writer at the station. Barbara Hershey is the 36-year-old woman who is twice divorced and is back home to find a third husband.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.