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Barbara Ehrenreich

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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | September 16, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It's 4 a.m. when Barbara Ehrenreich wakes up in a cold sweat. A writer with 20 years experience, it's not a deadline that's shaken her out of peaceful slumber. "I'm thinking about the table whose order I screwed up so that one of the boys didn't get his kiddie meal until the rest of the family had moved on to their Key Lime pies," she writes in her latest book, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America (Metropolitan Books, $23). This is not the kind of thing that most best-selling authors and social critics think about late at night.
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NEWS
By Mark Coleman and Mark Coleman,Los Angeles Times | January 14, 2007
Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy Barbara Ehrenreich Metropolitan Books / 322 pages / $26 In the 21st century, most people have experienced at least a watered-down version of what author Barbara Ehrenreich calls collective joy. Many are susceptible to flashes of communal ecstasy in stadiums or auditoriums, nightclubs or public parks, at concerts and dances and sports events. Participation in such familiar - not to say cliched - rituals can spark a vague but intensely pleasurable group consciousness.
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NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | July 25, 2004
REACTIONS TO BILL Cosby's recent criticisms of some counterproductive ghetto behavior patterns have ranged from applause from some in the black audience that heard him to a cheap attack from white liberal Barbara Ehrenreich in The New York Times. "Billionaire bashes poor blacks" is the way Ms. Ehrenreich puts it. Over the years, Mr. Cosby has poured enough of his efforts and money into advancing blacks that he does not need any lessons from Ms. Ehrenreich on how to help his own people.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | July 25, 2004
REACTIONS TO BILL Cosby's recent criticisms of some counterproductive ghetto behavior patterns have ranged from applause from some in the black audience that heard him to a cheap attack from white liberal Barbara Ehrenreich in The New York Times. "Billionaire bashes poor blacks" is the way Ms. Ehrenreich puts it. Over the years, Mr. Cosby has poured enough of his efforts and money into advancing blacks that he does not need any lessons from Ms. Ehrenreich on how to help his own people.
NEWS
By Stephanie Gutmann and Stephanie Gutmann,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1995
"The Snarling Citizen," essays by Barbara Ehrenreich. 245 pages. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. $20 One of the perks of getting really big in the celebrity journalist racket is that publishers start foraging around for any little scrap of stuff Ms. Write has ever written - be they laundry lists, half-finished novels, or ancient letters to the editor. This syndrome accounts for the Collection of Previously Published Material, a book format that is often disappointing because 1. the reader may have seen the material before or 2. the material was originally tailored to another medium - often a non-book medium like television or the lecture circuit.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
"Blood Rites: Origins and History of the Passions of War," by Barbara Ehrenreich. 292 pages. Metropolitan Books. $25.For centuries, sages have regularly announced the demise of warfare. New weapons (blunderbuss, Gatling gun, nuclear warhead) are so deadly as to make battle unacceptably costly. Political and economic change (emergence of trade, information revolution, end of the Cold War) have eliminated the motive for conquest.Yet human beings still are driven to massacre one another. And combatants justify even the most senseless slaughter as a sacred cause, as if Homo sapiens with his oversized brain had no higher purpose than to maim and kill.
NEWS
By Mark Coleman and Mark Coleman,Los Angeles Times | January 14, 2007
Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy Barbara Ehrenreich Metropolitan Books / 322 pages / $26 In the 21st century, most people have experienced at least a watered-down version of what author Barbara Ehrenreich calls collective joy. Many are susceptible to flashes of communal ecstasy in stadiums or auditoriums, nightclubs or public parks, at concerts and dances and sports events. Participation in such familiar - not to say cliched - rituals can spark a vague but intensely pleasurable group consciousness.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
Letter writer Michael Saltsman tells us the minimum wage is worth 6 percent more than it was 20 years ago (" Job-killer, thy name is minimum wage Sept. 16). That's less than comforting news considering the current minimum wage still won't allow a worker to be self-sufficient, even if he or she has two or three of those type jobs. This was chronicled quite effectively in Barbara Ehrenreich's book, "Nickel and Dimed," where she worked undercover at minimum wage jobs for a period of one year.
NEWS
January 5, 2012
As we enter the fourth year of an economic collapse and witness the remarkable emergence of "people power" across the country and around the world, the current crisis can be seen as an opportunity. Rather than rebuild the old status quo we should build smart, since all our societal problems are interrelated. Building smart means restructuring the health care system to serve the needs of people and their communities rather than to serve corporate profits. Because so many Americans' health care is tied to their jobs, when they lose those jobs their families' health care goes with them.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | February 9, 1993
Congratulations to the following magazines for NOT having a picture of Princes Di on their February covers:Good Housekeeping, Family Circle, Woman's Day, Ladies' Home Journal, Vogue, Glamour, Bazaar, and Redbook. They have pictures of either food or pretty models for a change.Of course, no kudus to the tabloids that still have poses of thr royal family in bikinis, nude or under those funny-looking hats.McCall's capitulated and has a picture of Di and a story by Di biographer Andrew Morton.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | September 16, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It's 4 a.m. when Barbara Ehrenreich wakes up in a cold sweat. A writer with 20 years experience, it's not a deadline that's shaken her out of peaceful slumber. "I'm thinking about the table whose order I screwed up so that one of the boys didn't get his kiddie meal until the rest of the family had moved on to their Key Lime pies," she writes in her latest book, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America (Metropolitan Books, $23). This is not the kind of thing that most best-selling authors and social critics think about late at night.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
"Blood Rites: Origins and History of the Passions of War," by Barbara Ehrenreich. 292 pages. Metropolitan Books. $25.For centuries, sages have regularly announced the demise of warfare. New weapons (blunderbuss, Gatling gun, nuclear warhead) are so deadly as to make battle unacceptably costly. Political and economic change (emergence of trade, information revolution, end of the Cold War) have eliminated the motive for conquest.Yet human beings still are driven to massacre one another. And combatants justify even the most senseless slaughter as a sacred cause, as if Homo sapiens with his oversized brain had no higher purpose than to maim and kill.
NEWS
By Stephanie Gutmann and Stephanie Gutmann,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1995
"The Snarling Citizen," essays by Barbara Ehrenreich. 245 pages. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. $20 One of the perks of getting really big in the celebrity journalist racket is that publishers start foraging around for any little scrap of stuff Ms. Write has ever written - be they laundry lists, half-finished novels, or ancient letters to the editor. This syndrome accounts for the Collection of Previously Published Material, a book format that is often disappointing because 1. the reader may have seen the material before or 2. the material was originally tailored to another medium - often a non-book medium like television or the lecture circuit.
NEWS
October 30, 2007
Rep. Mike Pence, an Indiana Republican, put it best recently in the Congressional Record when he spoke in favor of a bill he has fought hard to pass: "As a conservative who believes in limited government, I believe the only check on government power in real time is a free and independent press," Mr. Pence said. "The Free Flow of Information Act is not about protecting reporters; it's about protecting the public's right to know." The bill, which would give journalists qualified protection from revealing their sources in federal cases, passed the House, 398-21, and has strong, bipartisan support in the Senate, where both the House bill and a Senate version are under consideration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,Sun Staff | September 4, 2005
ECONOMY BAIT AND SWITCH: THE (FUTILE) PURSUIT OF THE AMERICAN DREAM By Barbara Ehrenreich. Metropolitan Books. 256 pages. In one newspaper job I had, co-workers and I began each day by debating issues and current events. During one discussion about anxiety over corporate downsizing, someone opined that workers needed to become "more nimble." I could barely stop from making a sour face. The comment struck me as "corporate-speak" -- sugarcoating for how unstable the workplace had become.
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