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Barbara Cook

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Barbara Cook approaches a song from the inside out, judging the weight of each measure, the point behind each word in a lyric. So when she sings, she starts from a place where there's nothing but truth. No artifice, no exaggeration, no self-aggrandizing flourish. Small wonder that Cook, who gives a concert at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall this Saturday, a week after turning 85, remains one of the most treasured vocal artists of our time. The years may have shaved some brightness and some top notes from her silvery soprano, but the glow remains as enveloping as ever.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Barbara Cook approaches a song from the inside out, judging the weight of each measure, the point behind each word in a lyric. So when she sings, she starts from a place where there's nothing but truth. No artifice, no exaggeration, no self-aggrandizing flourish. Small wonder that Cook, who gives a concert at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall this Saturday, a week after turning 85, remains one of the most treasured vocal artists of our time. The years may have shaved some brightness and some top notes from her silvery soprano, but the glow remains as enveloping as ever.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 24, 1993
When Barbara Cook sings a song, she makes it sound as if you're hearing it for the first time. It doesn't matter if it's one of the songs that has become a signature for her, such as "Carolina in the Morning," or if it's an entirely new song, such as "Carolina in the Morning," or if it's an entirely new song, such as "Soon," which Barry Manilow wrote for her in a yet-to-be-released animated film in which she plays thumbelina's mother.Cook sings these and two dozen others in "An Evening of Song," her one-woman revue at the Kennedy Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
I am off for a few days to deal with some minor medical stuff, and I did not intend to write any reviews, believe me. But I sat down last night to watch one segment of the preview DVD forĀ  "Kennedy Center Honors," and I got up some two hours later feeling like I had been on a wild, joyous, pop culture rollercoaster ride. And I wanted to at least give readers of this a blog a heads-up to catch this brilliant production at 9 tonight on CBS (WJZ-Channel 13). As usually happens, and as I annually forget, the segments on the honorees that I don't care so much about are the ones that blow me away -- and make me want to run out and buy their DVD or get a Netflix of one of their greatest movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 5, 2003
There are lots of good Broadway sopranos and even some excellent Broadway sopranos. But Barbara Cook - the singer who originated the roles of Marian the Librarian in The Music Man and Cunegonde in Candide - is in a class by herself. Although she hasn't created a role on Broadway in decades, Cook has been singing in concerts and cabarets since 1974. Tonight she begins her fifth engagement at Washington's Kennedy Center with a program titled simply Barbara Cook in Concert. Simplicity is, indeed, the key to this singer's greatness.
NEWS
January 9, 2006
Barbara Cook Davis, an entrepreneur and community activist, died of a heart attack Jan. 2 at her home in the Villa Nova neighborhood of Baltimore County. She was 58. Mrs. Davis hosted and produced a weekly talk radio program on WOLB (1010 AM) called In the Know, which discussed health care and family issues in the African-American community. She also owned a marketing and public relations firm whose clients have included City Council candidates. Before beginning the radio show about four years ago, Mrs. Davis worked for the City of Baltimore and as a producer for Maryland Public Television.
ENTERTAINMENT
David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
I am off for a few days to deal with some minor medical stuff, and I did not intend to write any reviews, believe me. But I sat down last night to watch one segment of the preview DVD forĀ  "Kennedy Center Honors," and I got up some two hours later feeling like I had been on a wild, joyous, pop culture rollercoaster ride. And I wanted to at least give readers of this a blog a heads-up to catch this brilliant production at 9 tonight on CBS (WJZ-Channel 13). As usually happens, and as I annually forget, the segments on the honorees that I don't care so much about are the ones that blow me away -- and make me want to run out and buy their DVD or get a Netflix of one of their greatest movies.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | November 22, 1991
HEY EVERYBODY: Will you be at "Sister Kathleen's Gala" tomorrow night? There are still a few tickets left for the dazzling show at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall which will honor Sister Kathleen and benefit the College of Notre Dame endowment fund. Originally, Dinah Shore was the star attraction, but she had to back out because of knee surgery. Gala chair Margaret McManus managed to land Donald O'Connor, the legendary Hollywood song and dance man, and Barbara Cook, the Broadway star about whom critic Rex Reed once said, "If I ever get to heaven, I expect the angels to sound like Barbara Cook."
NEWS
November 22, 1991
A performance honoring Sister Kathleen Feeley's retirement as president of the College of Notre Dame will feature former Hollywood star Donald O'Connor and concert singer Barbara Cook at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.Sister Kathleen studied at Notre Dame, taught there and became president in 1971. Tickets, at $50 and $100, are available by calling 582-5542. Proceeds benefit the College of Notre Dame's endowment fund.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Reporter | February 14, 2007
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman announced yesterday that he has retained the directors of seven county departments and has named Bob Francis, the acting director of Inspections, Permits and Licenses, as the agency's permanent leader. "This is my team," Ulman said in an announcement. "We took the time we felt was necessary to evaluate these positions and these directors, and I believe we have an incredibly good mix of steady senior leadership along with a few fresh faces with new ideas."
NEWS
January 9, 2006
Barbara Cook Davis, an entrepreneur and community activist, died of a heart attack Jan. 2 at her home in the Villa Nova neighborhood of Baltimore County. She was 58. Mrs. Davis hosted and produced a weekly talk radio program on WOLB (1010 AM) called In the Know, which discussed health care and family issues in the African-American community. She also owned a marketing and public relations firm whose clients have included City Council candidates. Before beginning the radio show about four years ago, Mrs. Davis worked for the City of Baltimore and as a producer for Maryland Public Television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 5, 2003
There are lots of good Broadway sopranos and even some excellent Broadway sopranos. But Barbara Cook - the singer who originated the roles of Marian the Librarian in The Music Man and Cunegonde in Candide - is in a class by herself. Although she hasn't created a role on Broadway in decades, Cook has been singing in concerts and cabarets since 1974. Tonight she begins her fifth engagement at Washington's Kennedy Center with a program titled simply Barbara Cook in Concert. Simplicity is, indeed, the key to this singer's greatness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 24, 1993
When Barbara Cook sings a song, she makes it sound as if you're hearing it for the first time. It doesn't matter if it's one of the songs that has become a signature for her, such as "Carolina in the Morning," or if it's an entirely new song, such as "Carolina in the Morning," or if it's an entirely new song, such as "Soon," which Barry Manilow wrote for her in a yet-to-be-released animated film in which she plays thumbelina's mother.Cook sings these and two dozen others in "An Evening of Song," her one-woman revue at the Kennedy Center.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | November 22, 1991
HEY EVERYBODY: Will you be at "Sister Kathleen's Gala" tomorrow night? There are still a few tickets left for the dazzling show at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall which will honor Sister Kathleen and benefit the College of Notre Dame endowment fund. Originally, Dinah Shore was the star attraction, but she had to back out because of knee surgery. Gala chair Margaret McManus managed to land Donald O'Connor, the legendary Hollywood song and dance man, and Barbara Cook, the Broadway star about whom critic Rex Reed once said, "If I ever get to heaven, I expect the angels to sound like Barbara Cook."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 30, 2002
Broadway soprano Barbara Cook's tribute concert, Mostly Sondheim, competes for a Tony Award this Sunday, and just three days later she brings the program to Washington's Kennedy Center as part of its continuing Sondheim Celebration. The word "mostly" refers to the fact that the selections include a number of songs Stephen Sondheim says he "wishes he had written," including works by Irving Berlin, Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields, and Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick. Cook, who will be accompanied by her long-time music director, Wally Harper, has performed Mostly Sondheim in London and New York.
NEWS
June 13, 1995
A robber held a gun to the head of a restaurant worker Saturday night but fled empty-handed when frightened customers and other workers bolted out a side door, triggering an emergency alarm, county police said.The man walked in the Red Hot & Blue restaurant in the 200 block of Old Mill Bottom Road shortly before midnight, grabbed employee Juan Padialla, 23, put a gun to the back of his head and demanded to see the manager, police said.When several workers and customers ran out and tripped the alarm, the gunman led Mr. Padialla out the front door and released him unharmed.
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