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Barbara Bush

NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | January 22, 1993
HOUSTON -- Memo to the news media: When George and Barbara Bush said they were looking forward to private life, they meant it -- with an emphasis on private.So, if you see them walking the dogs, Millie and Ranger, take notes. There may not be much else done in public view. Yesterday, their first full day back in Houston, there wasn't.Mr. Bush didn't even eat lunch at Otto's barbecue, to the disappointment of many who went to the place hoping to see him.Not that the Bushes weren't busy, said Andrew Card, former secretary of transportation, now Bush transition director.
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FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Staff Writer | January 15, 1993
Of all the things we know -- or think we know -- about Barbara Bush, a few items leap instantly to mind:* That she has devoted her life to being a wife and mother and has no regret about her choice to live what some have called a "derivative" life.* That she's friendly, modest, funny, down-to-earth.* That she's America's Grandma, a woman who is quite comfortable with looking her age and, unlike her predecessor, Nancy Reagan, is not heavily invested in clothes, makeup and artificially colored hair.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton's casual comment in a Wall Street Journal interview the other day that, while he won't be appointing his wife, Hillary, to an official position, he hopes she'll be sitting in on Cabinet meetings, suggests a quantum leap in the role of the nation's first lady.Other wives of presidents have taken on substantive issues during their White House residencies, but nearly always with special projects they have carved out for themselves in a particular area.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | November 27, 1992
Politics aside, the presidential election may have brought an end to a nice radio tradition established just last year by first lady Barbara Bush. But happily, "Mrs. Bush's Story Time" can be heard again this holiday season.Did you listen? Last night on WBAL-AM 1090, Baltimore Oriole Cal Ripken Jr. joined everybody's aunt Mrs. Bush and other celebrity voices to read holiday stories for kids.The four-hour Thanksgiving special also included ABC weather guy Spencer Christian, country singer Reba McEntire and Winnie the Pooh.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- One has been described as a tough political insider who is fiercely protective of her husband's interests; the other has gained a reputation as a warm friend and devoted mother.Both descriptions fit Hillary Clinton and both fit Barbara Bush. Yesterday, the two women met at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue to search for other common ground.The occasion was a tour of the White House for its new resident, Mrs. Clinton. As part of this week's ceremonies involving rituals of transferring power, the two women stepped delicately into the footprints their husbands left on the White House lawn on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau Staff Writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | November 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush gratefully accepted cheers from thousands of well-wishers at the White House yesterday and expressed the wistful hope that "maybe history will record" a strong contribution by him and his team.Returning from Texas and a resounding defeat, Mr. Bush walked across a damp South Lawn from his motorcade as glum staffers, senior aides, congressional leaders and supporters turned suddenly buoyant and raucous to welcome him."Maybe you didn't read the election returns. It didn't work out quite the way we wanted," he joked.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | October 30, 1992
While "Beauty and the Beast" has turned a lot of youngsters into fantasy figures this Halloween, the election year is bringing out the politicians in the older generation.Rubber masks of George Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot should help provide the final word in political overload. A lot of customers still buy masks of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan, says Harriet Berlin, owner of Artistic Costumes and Dance Fashions in Loch Raven Plaza. "We wanted to offer Dan Quayle, but it was such a popular mask, we never got our order," she says.
NEWS
By Susan McLane | October 28, 1992
BARBARA Bush and I have a lot in common.We have both been married for 44 years. We each have five children and 12 grandchildren.We look somewhat alike, with white hair, ample hips and wrinkles from the sun and smiling.Sometimes I, too, wear three strands of pearls.We both left college to marry similar men: New Englanders by birth, Ivy League graduates. Both signed up to serve in World War II the day they turned 18.George Bush was shot down over the Pacific and rescued by a submarine. My husband Malcolm flew 73 missions in his P-47 before being shot down over Germany and taken prisoner.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | October 8, 1992
Forget the deficit. Forget the debates and family values and whether Yo-Yo Perot is up or down, in or out. Put Hillary-bashing and Bushanoia and Clintonesia on the back burner. In this year of presidential politics, it is now time to turn our attention to the burning issue of the day: Beautygate.Here's the deal: Barbara Bush, a woman who is admired widely for feeling comfortable about looking her age -- she refuses to dye her white hair, doesn't go on crash diets, eschews cosmetic surgery, etc., etc. -- suddenly has been revealed by the Houston Post as a fraud!
NEWS
By Michael Kernan | October 1, 1992
I AM amazed at all this talk about "trust" in the campaign.I have voted in the last 11 presidential elections, and I don't recall ever before being asked to "trust" any of the candidates. I thought everyone understood that politicians are to like but not to trust, that a great deal of what they say is rhetoric and not to be taken literally. They are by nature compromisers and artists of the possible.The one and only difference between liberals and conservatives is that liberals have a somewhat more ambitious notion of what is possible.
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