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Barbara Boxer

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By Rhonda Chriss Lokeman | July 27, 1995
POOR BARBARA Boxer. The California Democrat is a voice in the wilderness known as the United States Senate, where guys named Kennedy have masters degrees in lechery and guys named Packwood have Ph.D.s in pawing.Senator Boxer has been trying to force a public hearing on allegations of sexual and official misconduct by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Bob Packwood, R-Ore.But Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., the chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Ethics, wants Ms. Boxer to behave. Among other things, Ms. Boxer keeps insisting that most ethics investigations have at this stage gone public by now. She points to Senate misconduct investigations of senators who had public hearings: Alan Cranston (1990-1991)
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NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2010
When she arrived for her senior aerobics class at the Randallstown Community Center the other morning, Mrs. Willie Tombs was surprised to bump into Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski. Tombs got a kiss and hug from the Democratic veteran, along with a gentle reminder that "we're doing early voting now. Can we count on you to turn out?" The answer was yes. After the senator moved on, the Pikesville resident said she's been personally familiar with Mikulski "for years. I knew her when she was a social worker" in East Baltimore in the 1960s.
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NEWS
September 22, 1993
TIRED of baseball cards? Maybe you should try economist cards. The Associated Press reports that a Michigan professor has developed a set of trading cards depicting distinguished economists.Dale Matcheck, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan at Flint, and members of the university's Economics Club developed a set of 29 trading cards, each featuring an economist's picture, education, career and a quotation."I see it as a way for students to get acquainted with some of the personalities of economists and maybe spur them to look into primary literature, rather than just read the textbooks," Dr. Matcheck said.
NEWS
June 1, 2010
Perhaps Susan Reimer doesn't understand the military, if you did, you might understand what happened here ("Yes, Barbara Boxer should be called 'senator,'" June 1)! First of all, for that Brigadier General Michael Walsh to call that U.S. senator "ma'am," he was actually showing her even more respect than her "hard-earned title" of senator! For an officer of his rank, to call her ma'am, was the highest compliment that he could pay her! As to that "hard-earned" statement of hers, any idiot with enough money can purchase that title, and the senate itself is evidence of that fact!
NEWS
March 20, 1995
MARYLAND's Sen. Paul Sarbanes was among seven senators who were trapped on Congress' new, state-of-the-art subway system for several minutes on March 9, forcing the Republican leadership to hold open a vote to table an amendment, according to Roll Call, a newspaper that covers the Hill.According to the paper, Mr. Sarbanes and four other senators were meeting in his office when bells rang, signaling a roll call vote.The group ran to catch a subway car in the Hart Building. Shortly after they boarded the train, it stalled with its doors locked closed.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 31, 2005
WASHINGTON - Democrats are likely to vote unanimously against John R. Bolton when his nomination to be ambassador to the United Nations comes before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee next week, according to Democratic and Republican lawmakers and aides. It would mark the first time committee Democrats have unanimously opposed a Bush diplomatic nominee and would put the nomination in peril if any Republicans defected to vote against him. But Republicans say they believe the outspoken conservative will win solid GOP backing in the committee, including from the moderate Sen. Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, who has voiced reservations about Bolton's nomination to be U.N. ambassador.
NEWS
June 1, 2010
Perhaps Susan Reimer doesn't understand the military, if you did, you might understand what happened here ("Yes, Barbara Boxer should be called 'senator,'" June 1)! First of all, for that Brigadier General Michael Walsh to call that U.S. senator "ma'am," he was actually showing her even more respect than her "hard-earned title" of senator! For an officer of his rank, to call her ma'am, was the highest compliment that he could pay her! As to that "hard-earned" statement of hers, any idiot with enough money can purchase that title, and the senate itself is evidence of that fact!
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The motion picture industry is up in arms over California Sen. Barbara Boxer's decision to side with directors and writers in a battle over film labeling that has split the movie industry.Ms. Boxer and Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Association of America, engaged in a near-shouting match on the phone last month over the issue, which focuses on disclaimers when films are materially altered for other markets after their commercial release.It pits the creative side of the business -- directors, writers and cinematographers -- against the major studios, which own the films and depend on the secondary markets to make much of their profit.
NEWS
October 25, 1992
If the polls are right, the election of a Democrat, Bill Clinton, will end the partisan standoff that has paralyzed Washington for years. Even the most optimistic Republicans now concede that Democrats will retain control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate in next month's election.But exactly what the next two years in Washington will be like depends heavily on precisely who wins in the election this fall of 435 House members and 36 senators.Will Democrats keep enough seats to maintain a moderate-to-liberal working majority in the House?
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | April 18, 1991
Planning and winning the Persian Gulf War were easy compared to a new battle faced by the Bush administration: It wants to close 31 major military installations around the country.The last time this was tried was 1988, when the Reagan Administration attempted to shut or scale back 86 military facilities. After a major battle with Congress, only one, Pease Air Force Base in Newington, N.H., has closed.Military bases provide jobs and economic benefits to the communities in which they are located, but when they have outlived their usefulness, become white elephants.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 17, 2010
After Lyndon Johnson was elected to Congress in 1937, he got word that a liberal magazine, The New Republic, was going to profile him alongside other New Deal stalwarts. Johnson was horrified. He called a friend from the International Labor Organization and begged her to find some prominent labor figure to repudiate him. If "they put out that ... I'm a liberal hero up here," LBJ sputtered, "I'll get killed. You've got to find somebody to denounce me!" Alas, Mickey Kaus, the blogger turned California Democratic Senate candidate, has even bigger problems.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 31, 2005
WASHINGTON - Democrats are likely to vote unanimously against John R. Bolton when his nomination to be ambassador to the United Nations comes before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee next week, according to Democratic and Republican lawmakers and aides. It would mark the first time committee Democrats have unanimously opposed a Bush diplomatic nominee and would put the nomination in peril if any Republicans defected to vote against him. But Republicans say they believe the outspoken conservative will win solid GOP backing in the committee, including from the moderate Sen. Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, who has voiced reservations about Bolton's nomination to be U.N. ambassador.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The motion picture industry is up in arms over California Sen. Barbara Boxer's decision to side with directors and writers in a battle over film labeling that has split the movie industry.Ms. Boxer and Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Association of America, engaged in a near-shouting match on the phone last month over the issue, which focuses on disclaimers when films are materially altered for other markets after their commercial release.It pits the creative side of the business -- directors, writers and cinematographers -- against the major studios, which own the films and depend on the secondary markets to make much of their profit.
NEWS
By Rhonda Chriss Lokeman | July 27, 1995
POOR BARBARA Boxer. The California Democrat is a voice in the wilderness known as the United States Senate, where guys named Kennedy have masters degrees in lechery and guys named Packwood have Ph.D.s in pawing.Senator Boxer has been trying to force a public hearing on allegations of sexual and official misconduct by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Bob Packwood, R-Ore.But Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., the chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Ethics, wants Ms. Boxer to behave. Among other things, Ms. Boxer keeps insisting that most ethics investigations have at this stage gone public by now. She points to Senate misconduct investigations of senators who had public hearings: Alan Cranston (1990-1991)
NEWS
March 20, 1995
MARYLAND's Sen. Paul Sarbanes was among seven senators who were trapped on Congress' new, state-of-the-art subway system for several minutes on March 9, forcing the Republican leadership to hold open a vote to table an amendment, according to Roll Call, a newspaper that covers the Hill.According to the paper, Mr. Sarbanes and four other senators were meeting in his office when bells rang, signaling a roll call vote.The group ran to catch a subway car in the Hart Building. Shortly after they boarded the train, it stalled with its doors locked closed.
NEWS
September 22, 1993
TIRED of baseball cards? Maybe you should try economist cards. The Associated Press reports that a Michigan professor has developed a set of trading cards depicting distinguished economists.Dale Matcheck, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan at Flint, and members of the university's Economics Club developed a set of 29 trading cards, each featuring an economist's picture, education, career and a quotation."I see it as a way for students to get acquainted with some of the personalities of economists and maybe spur them to look into primary literature, rather than just read the textbooks," Dr. Matcheck said.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | April 30, 1992
Los Angeles -- The country is falling apart and its greatest news organizations are out taking polls -- and endlessly analyzing them -- on what people think of Hillary Clinton. Am I the only person in America who thinks about her as little as possible?I am dubious about the importance of the ''character'' of our leaders or candidates for leadership to begin with -- Was Napoleon nice to his dog? Was Churchill a drunk? -- so I have no patience at all for character studies of their spouses. And I am frightened by loose talk of White House partnerships and Cabinet positions.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2010
When she arrived for her senior aerobics class at the Randallstown Community Center the other morning, Mrs. Willie Tombs was surprised to bump into Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski. Tombs got a kiss and hug from the Democratic veteran, along with a gentle reminder that "we're doing early voting now. Can we count on you to turn out?" The answer was yes. After the senator moved on, the Pikesville resident said she's been personally familiar with Mikulski "for years. I knew her when she was a social worker" in East Baltimore in the 1960s.
NEWS
October 25, 1992
If the polls are right, the election of a Democrat, Bill Clinton, will end the partisan standoff that has paralyzed Washington for years. Even the most optimistic Republicans now concede that Democrats will retain control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate in next month's election.But exactly what the next two years in Washington will be like depends heavily on precisely who wins in the election this fall of 435 House members and 36 senators.Will Democrats keep enough seats to maintain a moderate-to-liberal working majority in the House?
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | April 30, 1992
Los Angeles -- The country is falling apart and its greatest news organizations are out taking polls -- and endlessly analyzing them -- on what people think of Hillary Clinton. Am I the only person in America who thinks about her as little as possible?I am dubious about the importance of the ''character'' of our leaders or candidates for leadership to begin with -- Was Napoleon nice to his dog? Was Churchill a drunk? -- so I have no patience at all for character studies of their spouses. And I am frightened by loose talk of White House partnerships and Cabinet positions.
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