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By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Bar food is different from restaurant cuisine. Bar food is straightforward fare, more substance than flair. Think battered pickles and hot roast beef sandwiches. Cockey's Tavern, a bar with a handful of dining tables, does a good job dishing out solid, satisfying bar food. The tavern, located in a space formerly occupied by the Vietnamese restaurant Pho and, before that, Mencken's Cultured Pearl, pays homage to its West Baltimore locale. Black-and-white photographs of the area's old industrial buildings hang on the walls.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
From its waterfront perch at the corner of Thames Street and Broadway, Barcocina might occupy the most enviable real estate in all of Baltimore. With views of the harbor on one side and historic Fells Point on the other, the restaurant provides a glimpse of Baltimore at its most attractive. With those vistas and that central location, Barcocina's owners would have been forgiven for playing it safe in the kitchen, sticking with crab cakes and bar food. Instead, the restaurant has adopted a modern approach to Mexican food, serving creative twists on familiar dishes like tacos and seviche.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Wiley Gunter's is an easy place to like. It has everything a great neighborhood bar needs: super-friendly bartenders, big TVs, walls covered with sports memorabilia and a menu stocked with well-executed takes on familiar bar food. With all that, it's no surprise that around 7 on a recent Thursday night, the place was packed. Groups of friends wearing matching Kickball League of Baltimore T-shirts filled both of Wiley Gunter's two floors, grabbing beers before heading to games near the bar's Federal Hill-meets-Locust Point location.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Welcoming bars are nothing new in downtown Annapolis, and restaurants that celebrate southern food and Prohibition's repeal are nothing new anywhere anymore. But Dry 85, which opened on Main Street on the first day of 2014, combines all those things, creating something that is fun and surprisingly fresh. With a smart drinks list and food that is, for the most part, very good, it's a welcome addition the street. Scene & Decor The name Dry 85 refers to Washington D.C.'s 85 booze-free days between the repeal of Prohibition and the repeal of the Sheppard Act, which outlawed alcoholic beverages in the capital.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Charles Village Pub is all grown up — mostly. Before the January 2011 fire that destroyed its building, Charles Village Pub in Towson drew a local lunch crowd, but it was mostly known as a bar for college kids. It was a fun place for after-school beers. CVP is still a good place for drinks. But these days, thanks to a newly rebuilt interior and revamped menu that puts a local spin on traditional bar food, it's a nice place for a meal, too. After the fire, the building had to be completely reconstructed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom-Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
With country music blaring, honky-tonk decor, and a menu stacked with smokehouse favorites, Cowboys & Rednecks (also known as CNR) is hardly shy about its theme. We half expected the hostess to greet us with a "Yeehaw!" CNR's owner, Federal Hill resident and big-time country music fan Guy Naylor, opened the bar in late 2011, imagining that it would be a fun addition to his neighborhood. Local bar-hoppers agreed; CNR is often packed to overflowing on weekend nights. CNR's success as a bar is uncontested, but its status as a go-to restaurant is less confirmed.
NEWS
By The critics are Janice Baker (JB), Catherine Cook (CC), Mary Corey (MC), Mike and Sheila Dresser (M&SD), Lucy French (LF), Kathryn Higham (KH), Peter Jensen (PJ), Suzanne Loudermilk (SL) and Elizabeth Large (EL) | October 12, 1995
The Jean-Louis Palladin of bar food in Baltimore used to be the anonymous cook who made the oversized cheeseburger at Alonso's. But if you think today's bar food is only wings, potato skins and the like, you've got a treat coming. When you're bored with hamburgers, try the grilled portobello mushroom sandwich at the Wild Mushroom or the crab omelet at Jeannier's.Jeannier's? you say. Isn't that a French restaurant? It is, but it has a bar with a separate menu, more casual and less expensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 2, 1995
There is bar food, and then there is bar food. Jeannier's serves the second kind.The first kind is nachos and wings and burgers with fries. The other is onion soup gratinee made with a delicious homemade broth, crab omelets and a sirloin steak sandwich. With oeufs a la neige (floating island) for dessert.Jeannier's is predominantly a traditional French, special-night-out restaurant located in an apartment house, with all the interior-design excitement that an apartment house dining room usually generates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 6, 2001
When general manager Larry Shyman says that he's never seen a sports bar like the new Coliseum in the Cranbrook Shopping Center in Cockeysville, I believe him. It has 92 televisions (no, that's not a misprint), two separate bars, a dance floor and DJs Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. There's seating for 310. Customers have been going there to eat, not just drink, during the Coliseum's first couple of weeks of existence. There's a separate nonsmoking dining room where people can get steaks hand-cut in the restaurant's kitchen and dishes like "gator bites," made from fresh alligator flown in from Florida.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 16, 1994
Although there's nothing you love as much as a fat, briny oyster on the half shell straight from the sea, you've gotten a little nervous about raw shellfish lately. Oysters Rockefeller are good, but sometimes the oysters get lost among the spinach and Pernod. What to do?Well, you might try the baked oysters casino at Michael's Cafe, Raw Bar and Grill. It's an unorthodox treatment, but the kitchen resists loading down these plump beauties with bread crumbs. Each has a bit of crisp bacon and seasoned butter and is baked just long enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
“Sit at the bar. It's more fun,” greeted our bartender, slightly smirking on a recent Tuesday night in Upper Fells Point. We had just walked into Cockey's, the new neighborhood corner bar that moved from Hollins Market and opened in the former Shed Row space in January. With only one person seated at the time, we bypassed the five unoccupied high-top tables and settled in at the bar. It did not take long to realize Cockey's makes a strong addition to the area, filling a void for Upper Fells Point customers in search of an instantly comfortable bar, lacking frills and pretentions, in walking distance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
It's been open for less than a month, but The Nickel Taphouse has already established itself as a North Baltimore favorite. People have really taken to the new joint from Robbin Haas, whose Birroteca, which opened last fall, was a similar instant hit. The two places don't have much in common as far as cuisine. Birroteca serves rustic Italian food, while The Nickel Taphouse offers tavern fare. But the attitude is the same, and so is the extraordinary confidence governing every aspect of the restaurants' operations, starting with their physical design.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Jason Ambrose, the co-owner and founding chef of Salt , has agreed to purchase a tavern on Haubert Street in Locust Point. "It won't be anything restaurant-y like Salt," Ambrose said. "It will be a 'bar with food.' " There isn't enough room inside the small establishment for tables, he said After seven years running the kitchen at Salt, Ambrose turned over day-to-day kitchen operations to Brian Lavin . Ambrose won't close on the property until early November, he said, and the liquor board must approve the transfer of the liquor license to Ambrose from the property's current owners, Inga and Adam Gardner, who operate a bar at the location named The House . Ambrose said he hopes to have the Locust Point bar open in early 2014.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 31, 2013
The Swallow at the Hollow might be a dive bar, but don't let that scare you away from the menu. It's worth a try. The north Baltimore bar's history stretches back to the '40s, when it was a combo barber shop and bar. In recent years it has been a popular hangout for Loyola students and for a crew of regulars that keep the place lively, especially during Orioles' and Ravens' games. Under the ownership of Aaron Reinhart, who bought the Swallow in 2011, it's also blossomed into a good place for a casual bite to eat. Scene & Decor The inside of the Swallow is nothing to write home about - well-worn bar stools and neon liquor signs dominate the decor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
When Walter and Pauline Duda opened their eponymous tavern in 1949, Fells Point was an industrial hub, home to waterfront businesses and warehouses. The paving-stone streets are still there and much of the architecture has remained the same, but these days, the neighborhood's primary industry is a vibrant restaurant and nightlife scene. Duda's Tavern has adapted to the times. While retaining its corner-bar charm, it has evolved from a shot-and-beer bar to a welcoming hangout serving good drinks and capable takes on classic bar-friendly meals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom-Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
With country music blaring, honky-tonk decor, and a menu stacked with smokehouse favorites, Cowboys & Rednecks (also known as CNR) is hardly shy about its theme. We half expected the hostess to greet us with a "Yeehaw!" CNR's owner, Federal Hill resident and big-time country music fan Guy Naylor, opened the bar in late 2011, imagining that it would be a fun addition to his neighborhood. Local bar-hoppers agreed; CNR is often packed to overflowing on weekend nights. CNR's success as a bar is uncontested, but its status as a go-to restaurant is less confirmed.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 19, 2006
He wants mozzarella sticks, a burger and fries with his draft. She prefers a meal with more sophistication and fewer calories. She wouldn't mind a wine-by-the-glass suggestion, either. That's the restaurant Clayton's Tavern, which opened recently in Federal Hill, wants to be; and for the most part, it succeeds. The drawing card is the fact that bar food is on the menu with new American dishes such as salmon au poivre with a splash of Grand Marnier, glazed hearts of palm and horseradish mashed potatoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | June 25, 1993
Poor Richard'sWhere: 4 1/2 E. Pennsylvania Ave.Hours: Dining room, 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 1 p.m.-9 p.m. SundayCredit cards accepted: AE, MC, VFeatures: Bar food, steamed crabsNon-smoking section? YesCall: (410) 337-7110Prices: Entrees, $8.95-$16.95** 1/2Poor Richard's menu is a wonder to behold. It lists 48 specialty sandwiches, plus the usual tuna fish and roast beef. It's impressive, but I'm not sure it's impressive enough to steal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Big playoff games deserve big bar specials. A $3 domestics deal might have worked a couple of months ago, but the AFC championship game demands more. As players elevate their games, it's only fitting sports bars do, too. This concept is not lost on No Idea Tavern, the cozy Federal Hill bar a comfortable distance from the Cross Street Market madness. There are only four words you need to know about No Idea's Ravens special on Sunday: all you can drink. Although it's normally a New York Jets bar, No Idea will make an excellent spot for Ravens and Patriots fans, given its 17 TVs and larger-than-expected space.
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