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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2000
FOR DECADES, the corner saloon inside Baltimore's House of Welsh was the classic stag bar -- men only. Small and dimly lighted, it didn't even have bar stools because its patrons were just as happy to stand. "Women patrons would put a damper on the men-talk," owner Thomas Welsh groused to a reporter in 1970. "The bar provides some place where men can hide." The bar finally was forced to admit women in the early 1970s, after a federal judge in New York ruled that it was illegal for bars to keep out female patrons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Pizza, life's cheesy cure-all, makes a strong case as the ideal bar food because it's easy to share and rarely fails to please a crowd. The fact it goes hand-in-hand with beer helps, of course.  And while Baltimore is not often associated with pizza, the city has plenty of bars that serve high-quality pies and drinks in comfortable tavern settings. Verde, Birroteca, Johnny Rad's, HomeSlyce, Barfly's and Joe Squared have a verve all their own.  So let us highlight one more cozy pub deftly marrying pizza and a thoughtful bar program: Hersh's Pizza & Drinks in Riverside.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | April 26, 2007
Customers can see One-Eyed Mike's in two very different ways. On one hand, it's a crowded little Fells Point bar and restaurant, complete with a silly ahoy-ye-mateys name, a tattooed and T-shirted wait staff and a recent kitchen mishap featuring a fire extinguisher that went off when dropped. Poor:]
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
When driving down Baltimore National Pike in Ellicott City, it's easy for eyes to wander. The myriad restaurants and shops all fight for attention with colorful signs and promises of limited-time deals. It's enough to give you a headache. But tucked away in the Enchanted Forest Shopping Center - behind the defunct theme park, around the corner from a grocery store and out of view from the pike - is a bar and restaurant that is clearly interested in providing an experience not typically expected at a strip mall.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
The House of Welsh -- the aged downtown restaurant-bar where political deals were cut between slices of sizzling steak and shots of Maryland rye -- is closing next week.Owned by the same family since 1900, its three 1830s rowhouses were located out the back door of City Hall and attracted politicians, lobbyists, bookmakers, lawyers, policemen, judges and reporters who wanted plain, tasty food served in an unhurried manner -- the epitome of an old-time Baltimore steakhouse.Martin J. Welsh, the third generation of his family to own the business at 301 Guilford Ave., said he will reopen in Fenwick Island, Del."
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1998
In an effort to rejuvenate Columbia's downtown, a parking garage is under construction along Little Patuxent Parkway and Wincopin Circle, with plans calling for it to be topped off by a restaurant.The 280-space garage in Town Center will be completed by September. Rouse Co. officials say they are looking for a restaurant to occupy a facility on top of the garage. Rouse officials say they will wait for a tenant before building the restaurant.During construction, the parking area in front of the Columbia Association building will be closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | August 31, 2006
For class with a capital "C," few restaurants in town can top the 26-year-old Brass Elephant, located in a gorgeous 19th-century Mount Vernon townhouse. But two people can easily spend a c-note or more eating there. The solution, for those who want a snazzy atmosphere and delicious food but don't want to spend quite as much money, is the Tusk Lounge, the bar and restaurant on the restaurant's top floor. This is the place for those times you want to eat like a grown-up but pay kid-sized prices.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1996
The man proposing a bar and restaurant for the largest vacant building in Glen Burnie's urban renewal district has run into a formidable opponent: the area's state senator.Matt Powell will be explaining to the Glen Burnie Town Center Committee tomorrow his plan to put Peter's Bar and Restaurant into the Robinson's department store building near B & A Boulevard and Crain Highway. The committee must approve projects in the urban renewal district.But in a written statement to the committee, Sen. C. Edward Middlebrooks said the establishment would be a glorified nightclub selling "Junk Yard Punch," a 32-ounce drink containing five liquors.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1996
A renovated Robinson's department store building, the last ++ large, vacant building in the Glen Burnie urban renewal district, should be at least partially occupied by a new bar and restaurant in time for Halloween.Peter's Bar and Restaurant will take 10,000 of the 16,000 square feet on the first floor of the two-story building, officials of the company that owns the building told the Glen Burnie Town Center Committee yesterday.The building on Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard east of Crain Highway has been vacant for more than seven years, during which several attempts by its owners, the North Star Group, to find tenants have fallen through.
NEWS
December 12, 1995
ANNAPOLIS MAYOR Alfred Hopkins finally has taken a stand on bar and restaurant closing times downtown in the state capital. Unfortunately, his plan is sure to anger everyone involved in the issue and hamper the city's economy to boot.Until now, the battle has revolved around whether a 2 a.m. closing time enjoyed by some establishments ought to be extended to all. Yes, say bar owners. Over our dead bodies, say members of the Ward One Residents Association. Unfair though it is, the two-tiered system of closings is part of the Ward One Sector Study, a series of agreements between downtown business and residents which the association considers sacred and untouchable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
The Liberatore family is on a roll. Well known in the northern Baltimore suburbs for their eponymous Italian restaurants, the Liberatore family is branching out. Lib's Grill in Perry Hall, the family's seventh restaurant, ditches the Italian in favor of a steak and seafood concept. The menu feels familiar, and diners will find few surprises or adventurous choices among its snacks, sandwiches, steak and seafood. But some dishes are classics for a reason. When they're well executed, as most are at Lib's Grill, and served with aplomb, even commonplace foods are cause for celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
After a bar has been around for a while, it's easy to take it for granted. This year, three Baltimore bars that have been in business for over a decade marked major anniversaries: Brewer's Art turned 15 and Max's 25. These two bars are hardly taken for granted; they are universally praised by wildly different constituencies. The third, though, which turned 15 in September, doesn't get nearly enough love. Holy Frijoles deserves recognition. It has excellent, under-rated cocktails - the margaritas are poured by the dozen - and a menu that is stuffed with guilty pleasures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
On the morning a fire devasted the Mt. Washington Tavern, its two owners, Rob Frisch and Dave Lichty, rushed to the scene convinced the incident would be minor. "While we were driving down, my wife said, 'I still have to get a Halloween costume because I'm bartending tonight,'" Lichty said. "We didn't know what were walking into. " The two owners had been working at the restaurant since their early 20s, each doing his best to keep together a bar and restaurant that was famous for its consistency and that had become a mainstay in the city, and especially during the annual Preakness Stakes.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
The Power Plant Live entertainment district is getting a permanent outdoor stage with oversized video screens covered by a 50-foot-high glass canopy in time for next summer's concert season, the project's developer said Friday. The $11 million makeover also includes new bars and restaurants and marks the first major renovations since the project opened a decade ago in downtown Baltimore a block north of the Inner Harbor. "It's building upon an existing strength and taking it to a new level," said Reed Cordish, a vice president of Baltimore-based Cordish Cos., which renovated the collection of buildings formerly known as the Brokerage and opened Power Plant Live at the end of 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | April 26, 2007
Customers can see One-Eyed Mike's in two very different ways. On one hand, it's a crowded little Fells Point bar and restaurant, complete with a silly ahoy-ye-mateys name, a tattooed and T-shirted wait staff and a recent kitchen mishap featuring a fire extinguisher that went off when dropped. Poor:]
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington, Andrew A. Green and Laura Smitherman and Kelly Brewington, Andrew A. Green and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporters | April 7, 2007
The Maryland Senate approved a statewide ban on smoking in bars and restaurants last night after days of negotiations on a compromise measure that dropped exemptions for private clubs. The General Assembly is expected to approve to the measure Monday, when the House of Delegates takes a final vote on the bill. The Senate's vote, 31-16, came last night after negotiators from the Senate and the House of Delegates spent the day hashing out what had become a major sticking point: whether the ban should allow exemptions for private clubs such as the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Evening Sun Staff | January 16, 1991
As the clock struck midnight and beyond last night, patrons at some Baltimore bars were not glued to television sets, watching news reports from the Persian Gulf."
NEWS
September 6, 1996
THERE WAS A time when "Robinson's Corner" in Glen Burnie was a landmark -- not only because of the department store of the same name near the juncture of B&A Boulevard and Crain Highway, but also because it was the location of one of the only two traffic lights between Baltimore and Annapolis. Hard as it is for anyone driving between those cities on local highways to fathom now, that was a fact 60 years ago.Robinson's was notable in another respect. Started by Irving E. Robinson, former general manager of Mayer's department store in South Baltimore, it was one of the earliest attempts by a retailer to go after the growing suburban market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | August 31, 2006
For class with a capital "C," few restaurants in town can top the 26-year-old Brass Elephant, located in a gorgeous 19th-century Mount Vernon townhouse. But two people can easily spend a c-note or more eating there. The solution, for those who want a snazzy atmosphere and delicious food but don't want to spend quite as much money, is the Tusk Lounge, the bar and restaurant on the restaurant's top floor. This is the place for those times you want to eat like a grown-up but pay kid-sized prices.
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