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By Geraldine Segal | March 10, 1994
Verdi's "Macbeth" opens Saturday at the Lyric, featuring Baltimore-born bass James Morris and the Baltimore Opera.Here, a Baltimore opera buff's irreverent account of the action, with apologies to Shakespeare and Verdi. Warning: If you don't know how this tragedy comes out, stop reading now.Three groups of witches on a heath appearWith prophecies for Macbeth that he's eager to hear.He'll become Thane of Cawder and then Scotland's king.Banquo will father royalty; that's the news that they bring.
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By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company's production of Macbeth will make your heart pound, and not just when Macbeth wields bloody daggers after murdering Duncan, or when Banquo rises, eerily, from the dead. Like other CSC productions, Macbeth is staged at the skeletal ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute, set on an appropriately spooky Ellicott City hilltop.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 1996
With "local Shakespeare," you know in advance there will be a drop-off in talent between the gifted few and the well-intentioned but less-seasoned many.As the current Colonial Players of Annapolis presentation of "Macbeth" reminds us, this is most apparent in ensemble scenes where the poetic flow is compromised by the interplay of such unevenly matched characters and voices.But, if I may mix words and plays, I come not to bury Colonial's "Macbeth" but to praise it.For despite inevitable moments of turbulence in the talent pool, there was some remarkable acting, a lot of sure-handed direction and a succession of intensely drawn, downright spooky dramatic moments.
NEWS
By Lois Burdett | November 28, 1999
Editor's note: This excerpt from Shakespeare's play about the misguided nobleman explores Macbeth's pivotal meeting with three witches who can see into the future.Macbeth sat brooding, his thoughts far away. "The Thane of Fife didn't come today.I wonder if he's hatching some plot.My spies will discover what I cannot.Tomorrow I'll meet the witches three, and ask what they can predict for me."The sisters were hidden in a cavern deep;Around the cauldron, they did creep.With their hands so crinkled with time,They stirred a stinking putrid slime.
NEWS
By Lois Burdett | November 28, 1999
Editor's note: This excerpt from Shakespeare's play about the misguided nobleman explores Macbeth's pivotal meeting with three witches who can see into the future.Macbeth sat brooding, his thoughts far away. "The Thane of Fife didn't come today.I wonder if he's hatching some plot.My spies will discover what I cannot.Tomorrow I'll meet the witches three, and ask what they can predict for me."The sisters were hidden in a cavern deep;Around the cauldron, they did creep.With their hands so crinkled with time,They stirred a stinking putrid slime.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company's production of Macbeth will make your heart pound, and not just when Macbeth wields bloody daggers after murdering Duncan, or when Banquo rises, eerily, from the dead. Like other CSC productions, Macbeth is staged at the skeletal ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute, set on an appropriately spooky Ellicott City hilltop.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 14, 1994
The Baltimore Opera Company "Macbeth" that was unveiled Saturday evening earns fairly high marks on musical and vocal grounds but can't even manage a "gentleman's C" on the way it looks.This was James Morris' first attempt at the title role, and the Baltimore-born and -bred bass-baritone performed it handsomely indeed. Macbeth is a role that is usually performed by a true baritone, and singers of Morris' voice type usually are heard in the role of Banquo, a role that Morris has performed with great success in the past.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 24, 1997
Clocking in at under two hours, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival's "Macbeth" is a lean but less-than-mean killing machine.It's less than mean primarily because actor Neal Moran never fully conveys the unbridled homicidal ferocity of Macbeth's ambition. He's more a plodding than a plotting Macbeth.Granted, it's supposed to take some convincing on Lady Macbeth's part to get him to embark on his bloody deeds, and Moran's performance does get stronger after Macbeth is crowned. But in the early going, when Kristin Bennett's determined Lady Macbeth urges him to "screw your courage to the sticking point," he looks at her with the passionless expression of a middle manager stuck in a dull business $H meeting.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2004
If she sought the ultimate challenge for her third U.S. Naval Academy production, Masqueraders drama troupe director Christy Stanlake might have found it in Shakespeare's Macbeth. The chilling tale of ambition proved well within the grasp of Stanlake and her players in performances over the past two weekends at Mahan Hall. It could also have moved them closer to Stanlake's goal of making the Navy theater an exciting, well-known program "off the yard." Stanlake brought an innovative, nontraditional production of Macbeth to the stage with the help of set and costume designer Richard Montgomery, a theatrical designer who has nearly 300 credits with such companies as Royal Court Theatre, Old Vic and American Repertory Theatre.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2007
"Double, double toil and trouble;/Fire, burn; and, caldron, bubble." The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is presenting Macbeth through Dec. 2 at Howard County Center for the Arts. In the public mind, the three witches have almost become comic characters. Stirring their steaming brew and chanting their imprecations, they are ideal subjects for comedy sketches and magazine cartoons, not to mention informal gags at the kitchen range. But if an audience can immerse itself in the idea that people in Shakespeare's dark, savage Scotland believe seriously in mystic forces that can shape their lives and forecast their destinies, the play will unfold in all its power.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 24, 1997
Clocking in at under two hours, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival's "Macbeth" is a lean but less-than-mean killing machine.It's less than mean primarily because actor Neal Moran never fully conveys the unbridled homicidal ferocity of Macbeth's ambition. He's more a plodding than a plotting Macbeth.Granted, it's supposed to take some convincing on Lady Macbeth's part to get him to embark on his bloody deeds, and Moran's performance does get stronger after Macbeth is crowned. But in the early going, when Kristin Bennett's determined Lady Macbeth urges him to "screw your courage to the sticking point," he looks at her with the passionless expression of a middle manager stuck in a dull business $H meeting.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 1996
With "local Shakespeare," you know in advance there will be a drop-off in talent between the gifted few and the well-intentioned but less-seasoned many.As the current Colonial Players of Annapolis presentation of "Macbeth" reminds us, this is most apparent in ensemble scenes where the poetic flow is compromised by the interplay of such unevenly matched characters and voices.But, if I may mix words and plays, I come not to bury Colonial's "Macbeth" but to praise it.For despite inevitable moments of turbulence in the talent pool, there was some remarkable acting, a lot of sure-handed direction and a succession of intensely drawn, downright spooky dramatic moments.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 14, 1994
The Baltimore Opera Company "Macbeth" that was unveiled Saturday evening earns fairly high marks on musical and vocal grounds but can't even manage a "gentleman's C" on the way it looks.This was James Morris' first attempt at the title role, and the Baltimore-born and -bred bass-baritone performed it handsomely indeed. Macbeth is a role that is usually performed by a true baritone, and singers of Morris' voice type usually are heard in the role of Banquo, a role that Morris has performed with great success in the past.
NEWS
By Geraldine Segal | March 10, 1994
Verdi's "Macbeth" opens Saturday at the Lyric, featuring Baltimore-born bass James Morris and the Baltimore Opera.Here, a Baltimore opera buff's irreverent account of the action, with apologies to Shakespeare and Verdi. Warning: If you don't know how this tragedy comes out, stop reading now.Three groups of witches on a heath appearWith prophecies for Macbeth that he's eager to hear.He'll become Thane of Cawder and then Scotland's king.Banquo will father royalty; that's the news that they bring.
NEWS
October 4, 2005
AUGUST WILSON once said that jazz and blues music were an affirmation and celebration of the value and worth of the African-American spirit. Let us add a coda to that thought: So are the plays of August Wilson. The playwright's death Sunday is a tremendous loss to the American cultural repertory. He ranks among our greatest writers, his prize-winning plays offering a unique, vivid and powerful insight into the contemporary black experience. Mr. Wilson often described himself as a poet who turned into a playwright.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 30, 2000
Center Stage's production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" emphasizes the play's violence and bloodshed. Yet even this focus on the visceral never truly grabs you in the gut. The most successful scenes in this loud, and at times crude, production are those involving the witches. In these supernatural interludes, director Tim Vasen's interpretation takes on a vitality and fascination often lacking in the rest of the evening. Admittedly, crudeness, noise and blood aren't bad choices for a play about 11th-century Scottish warriors.
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