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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
A lawsuit over the ownership of the Westport waterfront that was dismissed last month by a bankruptcy judge will be re-filed in a different court, an attorney for real estate developer Patrick Turner said Monday. Kenneth B. Frank said the suit against potential investors, alleging they conspired to gain control of a 43-acre waterfront in southwest Baltimore, will soon be filed in federal district court. Frank, who represents Turner, his partner Thomas B. Fore and their Westport-related companies, said Judge Robert A. Gordon determined bankruptcy court was not an appropriate venue for the suit.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Longtime City Councilman Robert W. Curran filed for personal bankruptcy in June, a move he said was necessary to avoid foreclosure on his Northeast Baltimore home. Curran, 63, said in an interview Thursday that he will repay all of his restructured debt over the next five years under Chapter 13 bankruptcy, which allows individuals to keep their property while developing a plan through the court to repay some or all of the money owed on credit cards, auto loans, medical bills and other debt.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
Now that the city of Detroit declared that it was bankrupt ("Why Baltimore is not Detroit," July 21), let's take a look what are the main causes of this mess. Detroit had been governed for at least the past 20 years exclusively by Democrats. Not a single Republican has held an elected position there for the last two decades. The Democratic city leaders over-spent their operating budget repeatedly, excessively and certainly not carefully, which resulted in eventual collapse of all services and promises to the residents of this once prosperous city.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
Baltimore officials say Detroit's bankruptcy filing this week is a cautionary tale for the city that underscores the need to fix a $750 million structural deficit before the situation here grows similarly dire. "It is on my mind every day," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Friday, the day after Detroit became the largest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy protection. "Once you know that's a possibility, you have to spend the rest of your time trying to prevent it. " Bankruptcy is not currently an option for Baltimore, or any jurisdiction in Maryland - the General Assembly has passed no law to authorize such a move.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Michael G. Rinn, a Cockeysville bankruptcy attorney and longtime Civil War enthusiast who played a pivotal role in the preservation of a historic Western Maryland battlefield, died Saturday of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Hunt Valley resident was 61. "Aside from other talents and capabilities, Michael was a Chapter 7 bankruptcy trustee par excellence ; a position he held with distinction for over 25 years," said Zvi Guttman, a Baltimore bankruptcy trustee and longtime friend.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
The closing of the steel mill at Sparrows Point overwhelmed Bob Jennings. Too young to retire at 59, he faced a gloomy job market for local manufacturing workers and a bureaucracy that couldn't get him timely training help. He felt like a failure. No, no, his wife said, "the system is the failure," but she couldn't convince him. On a cold Saturday morning, he wrote her a short note of apology, walked to their shed and shot himself. Troy Pritt, 44, also worked at the Baltimore County mill.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
A Wednesday bankruptcy filing by Synagro Technologies Inc. means growth and new jobs for the Baltimore area as the waste recycler consolidates its headquarters in White Marsh. The Carlyle Group LP-owned company, which had been co-headquartered in Baltimore and Houston, said Wednesday that it would use bankruptcy to restructure debt and sell its assets to EQT Infrastructure in a $455 million deal. The company filed for a Chapter 11 reorganization of its debts in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware and said it expects the sale to be completed in two to three months.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
The nearly two dozen creditors of payroll firm AccuPay Inc. who jammed a hearing room in Baltimore's federal courthouse Tuesday left with no more answers than when they arrived. Bel Air-based AccuPay, which filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in March, is being investigated for allegedly defrauding clients, many of whom run small businesses in Harford County, by failing for years to remit their tax payments to federal and state tax collectors. The creditors meeting at the Edward A. Garmatz Federal Building, a routine step in the bankruptcy process, offered the first chance since the allegations came to light for creditors to get answers from owners of AccuPay, which shut down abruptly at the end of February.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
The family owners of The Inn at the Black Olive in Fells Point hope a bankruptcy filing Thursday will give them time to try to attract investors and keep operating the 2-year-old boutique hotel, their bankruptcy attorney said. The Black Olive Development Co. LLC's Chapter 7 filing in Baltimore's U.S. Bankruptcy Court prevented a planned foreclosure auction of the 12-suite luxury inn on South Caroline Street from going forward Thursday morning. Chapter 7 permits an orderly liquidation of assets to repay creditors, but the case could be converted to a Chapter 11 reorganization if the company finds investors.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
A Bel Air payroll company under investigation for allegedly not forwarding clients' tax payments to tax collectors has filed for bankruptcy. AccuPay Inc. filed a petition for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy Tuesday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, listing 95 creditors and debts of between $100,001 and $500,000. Chapter 7 allows for an orderly liquidation of a company's assets to pay off creditors. A bankruptcy attorney for the company's owners said Wednesday that his clients believe they will have funds available to pay creditors.
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