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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A man who, with his fiance, stole $130,000 from a Dundalk bank where she had previously worked as a teller, was sentenced in federal court Friday, authorities said. U.S. District Judge Richard D. Bennett sentenced Darrius Roszario D. Washington, age 20, of Baltimore, to more than 10 years in prison followed by five years of supervised release. His accomplice, Janaya B. Person-Robinson, 20, pleaded guilty will be sentenced on October 22. She had worked at the branch, was familiar with the bank's operating procedures and knew the employees, authorities say. The couple waited in the M&T Bank branch bank's parking lot on October 1, as employees were arriving to work when Washington stopped a bank employee walking from her car, authorities said.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A man who, with his fiance, stole $130,000 from a Dundalk bank where she had previously worked as a teller, was sentenced in federal court Friday, authorities said. U.S. District Judge Richard D. Bennett sentenced Darrius Roszario D. Washington, age 20, of Baltimore, to more than 10 years in prison followed by five years of supervised release. His accomplice, Janaya B. Person-Robinson, 20, pleaded guilty will be sentenced on October 22. She had worked at the branch, was familiar with the bank's operating procedures and knew the employees, authorities say. The couple waited in the M&T Bank branch bank's parking lot on October 1, as employees were arriving to work when Washington stopped a bank employee walking from her car, authorities said.
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NEWS
August 22, 2011
Usually I recycle Marta Mossburg's ultra-conservative rants without reading them. But her column "Kids' TV: last bastion of liberal utopia," Aug. 17, was so outrageous, I had to respond. Let me start with this sentence: "Individualism is bad, the collective - and especially the environment - are good. " Individualism is not bad, but it is foolish. Imagine a single person demanding an eight-hour-day. The corporate officials would have been roaring with laughter. In a time when a presidential candidate opines that corporations are people, we better unite as the corporate elite are destroying the middle class and slashing the poor's safety net. I have no idea how anyone would think the environment is bad. We have another presidential candidate who is a climate chaos denier.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano, The Los Angeles Times | December 24, 2013
A bank robbery suspect from South Florida was arrested by FBI agents after a string of approximately 20 heists along the Eastern Seaboard that included the September robbery of a PNC Bank in Catonsville, authorities announced Tuesday. Officials said Luis A. Alomar, 37, was arrested about 2:30 a.m. Tuesday in the Long Island suburb of Medford, N.Y. He was being held on state and federal charges in connection with the robberies, which began in August. Agents said Alomar used firearms or threatening notes to carry out the crimes.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano, The Los Angeles Times | December 24, 2013
A bank robbery suspect from South Florida was arrested by FBI agents after a string of approximately 20 heists along the Eastern Seaboard that included the September robbery of a PNC Bank in Catonsville, authorities announced Tuesday. Officials said Luis A. Alomar, 37, was arrested about 2:30 a.m. Tuesday in the Long Island suburb of Medford, N.Y. He was being held on state and federal charges in connection with the robberies, which began in August. Agents said Alomar used firearms or threatening notes to carry out the crimes.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | October 30, 1992
The first thing you notice is the flowers, blanketing the lawn in front of the bank. Some of the arrangements are quite elaborate, quite beautiful. Some are moving -- two wooden crosses covered in flowers. But, somehow, what seems most real is a simple glass jar filled with daisies.On the door of the bank, a nondescript brick building that betrays none of the horror seen there, hangs a single rose. Above the rose, a sign tells some of the story: "Sorry, we are closed due to an emergency." But it's a generic emergency sign.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
All banks have vaults. Most banks have vaults they can open.Last week, construction workers renovating the old Vermont Federal building accidentally shut the door to its room-sized safe. No one had the combination. The new tenant, Harbor Bank, faced the prospect of a grand opening next week with no place to put the money.Larry Boltansky, one of the owners of the West Fayette Street building had three options: Pay a locksmith up to $10,000, scour Maryland prisons for a safecracker, or hunt down a Vermont Federal employee with a good memory.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2000
If only the bank had lasted as long as the safe. First National Bank of Hampstead opened in 1910 and closed during the Great Depression. But the 6,000-pound cannonball pedestal safe sat there until last week, when a demolition crew hauled it away to make room for a new police station. After protecting money and treasures for decades, the elegant sphere could end up as scrap metal unless someone comes forward with a very strong concrete slab and a lot of cash to haul the safe. "There's no place in town we can put it," said Hampstead Town Manager Kenneth Decker.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
In the solitude of a Baltimore bank vault two weeks ago, the Rev. Casimir M. Peterson discovered a mysterious wooden container tucked inside a safe-deposit box.Opening it, he found a magnificent crown -- a solid-gold diadem, studded with hundreds of diamonds, emeralds and rubies -- that had disappeared from atop a statue of the Virgin Mary more than 25 years ago."My jaw dropped. I was stunned," recalls Peterson, president of the Reparation Society of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. "I thought, 'Mary wants her crown back.
NEWS
July 10, 1998
A photograph in yesterday's Maryland section showing the door of a bank vault now used as an office at Health Care for the Homeless was inadvertently reversed.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/10/98
NEWS
August 22, 2011
Usually I recycle Marta Mossburg's ultra-conservative rants without reading them. But her column "Kids' TV: last bastion of liberal utopia," Aug. 17, was so outrageous, I had to respond. Let me start with this sentence: "Individualism is bad, the collective - and especially the environment - are good. " Individualism is not bad, but it is foolish. Imagine a single person demanding an eight-hour-day. The corporate officials would have been roaring with laughter. In a time when a presidential candidate opines that corporations are people, we better unite as the corporate elite are destroying the middle class and slashing the poor's safety net. I have no idea how anyone would think the environment is bad. We have another presidential candidate who is a climate chaos denier.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2000
If only the bank had lasted as long as the safe. First National Bank of Hampstead opened in 1910 and closed during the Great Depression. But the 6,000-pound cannonball pedestal safe sat there until last week, when a demolition crew hauled it away to make room for a new police station. After protecting money and treasures for decades, the elegant sphere could end up as scrap metal unless someone comes forward with a very strong concrete slab and a lot of cash to haul the safe. "There's no place in town we can put it," said Hampstead Town Manager Kenneth Decker.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
In the solitude of a Baltimore bank vault two weeks ago, the Rev. Casimir M. Peterson discovered a mysterious wooden container tucked inside a safe-deposit box.Opening it, he found a magnificent crown -- a solid-gold diadem, studded with hundreds of diamonds, emeralds and rubies -- that had disappeared from atop a statue of the Virgin Mary more than 25 years ago."My jaw dropped. I was stunned," recalls Peterson, president of the Reparation Society of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. "I thought, 'Mary wants her crown back.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
All banks have vaults. Most banks have vaults they can open.Last week, construction workers renovating the old Vermont Federal building accidentally shut the door to its room-sized safe. No one had the combination. The new tenant, Harbor Bank, faced the prospect of a grand opening next week with no place to put the money.Larry Boltansky, one of the owners of the West Fayette Street building had three options: Pay a locksmith up to $10,000, scour Maryland prisons for a safecracker, or hunt down a Vermont Federal employee with a good memory.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | October 30, 1992
The first thing you notice is the flowers, blanketing the lawn in front of the bank. Some of the arrangements are quite elaborate, quite beautiful. Some are moving -- two wooden crosses covered in flowers. But, somehow, what seems most real is a simple glass jar filled with daisies.On the door of the bank, a nondescript brick building that betrays none of the horror seen there, hangs a single rose. Above the rose, a sign tells some of the story: "Sorry, we are closed due to an emergency." But it's a generic emergency sign.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2001
As German forces overran Europe in the spring of 1940, massive gold shipments began arriving in the United States from England, France, the Netherlands, Belgium and Norway for safekeeping. As the May invasion of Oslo began, Norwegian officials played a cat and mouse game with some 600,000,000 kronor, which they successfully managed to spirit away from the Nazis aboard a British troopship and deposit in a London bank vault. The next month, a shipment of gold estimated to be in excess of $500 million arrived in New York from England and France, shipped by way of Canada.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Joe Nawrozki and Kris Antonelli and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writers | September 14, 1992
A man armed with a knife held seven hostages inside a Gle Burnie bank vault today after his attempt to rob the bank was foiled by a customer who escaped and flagged down a passing police officer.By mid-day, eight other hostages had either escaped or were released from the Bank of Glen Burnie in the 100 block of S. Crain Highway.When the latest hostage was released, a crowd of about 150 onlookers applauded.While police SWAT team members and uniformed officers surrounded the bank, hostage negotiators were attempting to peacefully resolve the situation, police spokeswoman Officer Terry Robey said.
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