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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
Margie H. Muller, who served three governors as Maryland's bank commissioner and was the wife of a former Johns Hopkins University president, died at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday after a long struggle with emphysema. She was 71.Mrs. Muller presided over the state's banking industry from the early 1980s until the turbulent mid-1990s, when some of the nation's biggest banks were lobbying to move into Maryland so they could take over local institutions.She was appointed bank commissioner in 1983, a post that meant supervising a staff of 30 regulators and monitoring 80 state-chartered banks, 20 credit unions and mortgage brokers.
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NEWS
April 16, 2000
25 years ago: County's Heritage of Agriculture to be Stressed--Publishing an agricultural history of Carroll county is the aim of a committee organized at a meeting in Westminster, according to Dr. Robert McKinney, former county commissioner, who was lected chairman of the group. Carroll County has enjoyed a great agricultural heritage that goes back to the days when the Indians cleared small areas of land for crops in our fertile soils. Many families have records of their farm which go back several generations, yet very little of this information has been brought together into a publication which would be available for everyon to enjoy reading, says McKinney.
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NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1994
Maryland Bank Commissioner Margie H. Muller, whose agency oversees state-chartered banks and credit unions, solicited money last year from a credit union to help pay for her assistant's trip to a conference in Hawaii.The request came in a phone call from Ms. Muller to an executive at Baltimore-based MTA Employees Credit Union.It has prompted an investigation into whether Ms. Muller violated state law by seeking money from a company her office regulates.The funds -- about $1,300 -- were needed to send Assistant Commissioner Perry A. McAtee, who directly oversees state-chartered credit unions, to a conference of state regulators, according to credit union officials.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
Margie H. Muller, who served three governors as Maryland's bank commissioner and was the wife of a former Johns Hopkins University president, died at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday after a long struggle with emphysema. She was 71.Mrs. Muller presided over the state's banking industry from the early 1980s until the turbulent mid-1990s, when some of the nation's biggest banks were lobbying to move into Maryland so they could take over local institutions.She was appointed bank commissioner in 1983, a post that meant supervising a staff of 30 regulators and monitoring 80 state-chartered banks, 20 credit unions and mortgage brokers.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1996
Maryland Bank Commissioner Margie H. Muller was fired yesterday from the job she has held since 1983, after running afoul of Glendening administration appointees who wanted to cut the state bank regulation budget and consider less stringent regulation of some financial institutions.Mrs. Muller's $76,119-a-year job as bank commissioner will be merged with the position of commissioner of consumer credit, which regulates mortgage companies, retail store credit card units, and other lenders that do not accept customer deposits.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | February 6, 1991
A plan to unify Maryland's financial regulators under a single director would eliminate a number of high-ranking positions and save $500,000 over the next four years, Secretary of Licensing and Regulation William A. Fogle Jr. said yesterday.In a plan to be presented today to the Senate Finance Committee, Mr. Fogle said, he will unveil a series of cost-cutting steps that include combining into a single division Maryland's Office of the Bank Commissioner, the Office of Consumer Credit and the Financial Audit Services Team.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 22, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- For the time being, state-chartered credit unions can continue to receive insurance from the private Credit Union Insurance Corp., rather than being forced to obtain federal insurance.The House Economic Matters Committee made that decision last week and also agreed to sponsor legislation to extend the offices of bank commissioner and consumer credit commissioner until 2001, and to continue the phase-out of the Savings and Loan Division, which is scheduled to expire July 1, 1992.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | February 12, 1991
An article about state-chartered banks in some editions of yesterday's Money Today contained incorrect figures provided by the Office of the State Bank Commissioner.Net income for 78 state-chartered banks declined by 52.8 percent in 1990 to $123 million and the Riverdale-based Citizens Bank & Trust Co. of Maryland had a net income of $25.9 million, according to the revised figures.Hit by souring real estate loans, the 78 state-chartered banks saw their the consolidated net income drop by 49.2 percent in 1990, declining from $260.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | September 4, 1992
The 75 state-chartered banks in Maryland turned in an encouraging performance during the first half of the year, earning 19 percent more money than in the same period last year.Maryland's bank commissioner reported that the state-chartered banks earned a profit of $88 million for the period, compared with $73.8 million during the first half of 1991.The gain was even more impressive when contrasted with the last half of 1991, when Maryland-chartered banks lost $120.2 million.The biggest winner during the period was Mercantile Bankshares Corp.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | February 13, 1991
State-chartered banks in Maryland ended a dismal 1990 with their first quarterly loss in years as the local industry recorded a sixfold increase in the amount it put away to protect against a surge in problem loans.The 78 state-chartered banks, which account for roughly half of the bank assets in Maryland, lost $12.1 million during last year's fourth quarter, according to figures released yesterday by state regulators. In the final three months of 1989, they had income of $59.6 million.The figures released yesterday did not include the results for nationally chartered banks in Maryland, which include the state's two largest, Maryland National Bank and First National Bank of Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1998
Maryland's banking commissioner has approved First National Bank of Maryland's application to convert to a state banking charter, the Division of Financial Regulation said yesterday.The decision will bring in about $1.2 million in annual fees to the state, and nearly double the amount of assets overseen by the agency."They are in good financial condition, and they are well capitalized," said Anthony H. Zelaznicki, the state's assistant banking commissioner, who was instrumental in the decision.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1996
Maryland Bank Commissioner Margie H. Muller was fired yesterday from the job she has held since 1983, after running afoul of Glendening administration appointees who wanted to cut the state bank regulation budget and consider less stringent regulation of some financial institutions.Mrs. Muller's $76,119-a-year job as bank commissioner will be merged with the position of commissioner of consumer credit, which regulates mortgage companies, retail store credit card units, and other lenders that do not accept customer deposits.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1994
Maryland's state-chartered banks shored up their financial reserves in the first quarter of this year, but the price was a small drop in profitability, according to a state report.The 70 mostly smaller banks and trust companies that are regulated primarily by the state managed a first-quarter return on assets of 0.93 percent, the Maryland Bank Commissioner reported this week, despite a rise in interest rates that generally benefited financial institutions. Return on assets -- or net income divided by assets -- is a ratio that measures profitability without .. regard to the size of an institution.
NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1994
Maryland Bank Commissioner Margie H. Muller, whose agency oversees state-chartered banks and credit unions, solicited money last year from a credit union to help pay for her assistant's trip to a conference in Hawaii.The request came in a phone call from Ms. Muller to an executive at Baltimore-based MTA Employees Credit Union.It has prompted an investigation into whether Ms. Muller violated state law by seeking money from a company her office regulates.The funds -- about $1,300 -- were needed to send Assistant Commissioner Perry A. McAtee, who directly oversees state-chartered credit unions, to a conference of state regulators, according to credit union officials.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
Welcome to NationsBank.Customers of Maryland National Bank and American Security Bank, subsidiaries of the former MNC Financial Inc., would do well to look closely at a notice included in their bank statement recently.This notice says that the two banks will begin charging $20 a year for a product known as "checking reserve line of credit," better known as overdraft protection. If a customer has insufficient funds to cover a check, the bank makes good on it by extending the customer a short-term "loan."
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,State Bank CommissionerStaff Writer | October 5, 1993
What a difference a few months make.When Maryland Bank Commissioner Margie Muller was preparing her annual report on the effects of regional interstate banking, just a handful of large Maryland-based banks had two-fifths of the state's banking assets (about $21 billion), while the dozen or so banks owned by out-of-state companies had close to half that much (about $11 billion).That was June 30.Now, with the invasion from North Carolina -- the NationsBank/MNC merger, and the acquisition of the First American Banks by First Union Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | June 6, 1991
Hurt by large losses at a few major banks, earnings at Maryland's 78 state-chartered banks dropped by more than half during the first quarter.The office of the state bank commissioner has reported that state-chartered banks had total earnings of $26.6 million in the first quarter, a 56.4 percent drop from the $61 million earned during the 1990 first quarter.K? The figures did not include the first-quarter net income ofbanks with national charters, such as Maryland National Bank or First National Bank of Maryland, the two largest banks in the state.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | March 4, 1993
Maryland's state-chartered banks, buoyed by the continued drop in interest rates, posted sharply higher earnings in 1992, the State Bank Commissioner reported.The 69 state-chartered banks, two mutual savings banks and two trust companies earned a total of $177.5 million in 1992, contrasted with a loss of $68.5 million in 1991.The biggest participants in the turnaround were the Bank of Baltimore, which turned a $65 million loss in 1991 into a $16million profit last year, and Signet Bank/Maryland, whose $58 million loss two years ago was followed by a $9 million gain in 1992.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | July 15, 1993
Study says banks could lend moreDoes the blame for the paucity of bank lending lie with banks or borrowers? Veribanc Inc., a Massachusetts research firm, says evidence points to the banks.In a study of first-quarter data released this month, Veribanc says that of 11,473 banks the government considered "well-capitalized" (the highest category), 11,022 could boost lending by 10 percent or more and retain that rating. A 10 percent increase would amount to $778.2 billion in new loans, it says.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
Maryland's bankers and brokers have averted a minor war with each other thanks to a last-minute compromise over legislation that would impose tougher regulations on the trust operations of companies other than commercial banks, such as securities firms.Representatives of the two industries, as well as Maryland's bank commissioner, appeared before a Senate panel in Annapolis yesterday to explain the deal they worked out earlier this week over two bills filed on behalf of the Maryland Bankers Association.
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