Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBank Accounts
IN THE NEWS

Bank Accounts

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LOURDES SULLIVAN | October 22, 1993
Earlier this week I saw in the newspaper the list of abandoned savings and checking accounts that is published annually. It's the last-ditch effort by the banks and the state of Maryland to trace the owners of the funds.I'm not sure what happens to the money if it remains unclaimed.In some states the bank gets to keep it; in others, the state takes the loot.Well, because one year my mother-in-law found some money owned by my husband in his hometown account that he'd just forgotten about, I went browsing through the lists.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
A 25-year-old Baltimore man who pleaded guilty to murder-for-hire and witness-murder conspiracy charges this year in the 2011 killing of a 19-year-old associate was sentenced Monday to 35 years behind bars, plus five years of supervised release, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. Tavon Dameon Davis ordered the hit on 19-year-old Isiah Callaway after Callaway was arrested trying to open fraudulent bank accounts in Baltimore County in December 2010, prosecutors said.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 27, 1997
THE NAMES of 1,872 foreign holders of bank accounts opened before 1945 and dormant for at least 10 years, published by the Swiss Bankers Association, shed some light on Swiss banks' role during and after World War II.There are German Jews who perished in the Holocaust, others who survived or whose heirs did, Nazi war criminals, Spain's foreign minister, a Japanese diplomat. That the list is not purged of torturers and looters strengthens its credibility.This is a first pay-off from the seemingly honest efforts to get history right that have belatedly been made by Swiss bank and government authorities, and particularly from the international panel they established, chaired by former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul A. Volcker, to supervise research.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A Maryland woman pleaded guilty Tuesday to embezzling more than $143,000 from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, where she worked as a human resources analyst, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. Sheila Ann Howard, 56, of Capitol Heights in Prince George's County, began working for FEMA — which responds to disasters across the country such as the recent devastation from superstorm Sandy — as a disaster assistant in 1986, and later served as a staffing clerk and personal assistant, among other positions, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1997
From the start, NationsBank account No. 2362283 looked like trouble.Investigators spotted suspicious deposits to the Maryland account. They saw a stream of checks coming in from around the country. They traced wire transfers to banks in England, Nigeria, and the Czech Republic.But when they discovered the battered body of the woman who opened the account dumped in a field in Southern Maryland, the investigators knew they had real trouble on their hands."A brutal murder," U.S. postal investigator Robert F. Jones Jr. called it.What began as a modest bank probe nearly three years ago turned into a large international fraud case, leading to the indictments of nearly a dozen Nigerian nationals, many of them operating out of homes and storefronts in Maryland and Washington.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The owner-operator of a cosmetics company in Beltsville pleaded guilty Thursday to income tax evasion, prosecutors said. Bae Soo "Chris" Chon, 49, funneled revenue from Mirage Cosmetics Inc. into foreign bank accounts in Hong Kong and Seoul and understated his income on his personal income tax returns in 2008 and 2009, the U.S. Attorney's Office for Maryland said in a statement. Mirage manufactured cosmetics at a facility on Tucker Street in Beltsville and then sold the products in the United States at chain stores, including Walgreens, Target and Costco, the statement said.
NEWS
By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
A Baltimore man was sentenced Friday for his role in the death of a witness in a bank fraud investigation. Frank Marfo, 28, received life in prison after being convicted of murder, gun, and fraud conspiracy charges. The victim, 19-year-old Isaiah Callaway, had been accused of working for Marfo and his partner, Tavon Davis, 25, who had concocted a scheme to hire homeless men to steal rent checks and deposit them in fake bank accounts, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. Callaway was arrested by Baltimore County Police opening one of the bank accounts and was later killed on Davis' orders, fearing Callaway would cooperate with the police, officials said.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Oliver L. North, the Republican Senate candidate in Virginia, said this week that he has "no interest" in Swiss bank accounts that contain about $2.3 million in profits that were diverted from the sale of weapons to Iran in the mid-1980s.On Tuesday, after the Hearst News Service published an article about the accounts, Democratic Sen. Charles S. Robb asserted that the North family is "the sole beneficiary" of the money.The bank accounts, which were first disclosed nearly a decade ago, were frozen at the request of the federal government soon )
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
Maryland's attorney general alleged Wednesday that a Baltimore man had defrauded investors of nearly $500,000 and ordered him to stop selling securities and acting as an investment advisor, activities for which he was not registered. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is seeking fines and a permanent ban from the securities industry for Casey Charles and his company, Infinite Equity Strategies LLC. In a cease-and-desist order, the state accused Charles of transferring retirement funds of investors to an out-of-state company, which later transferred the money to his own bank accounts.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
A state audit released this week found that the agency responsible for child support failed to collect more than $1.7 billion over three years, largely because of insufficient enforcement against non-custodial parents who fell behind on their payments. The Office of Legislative Audits reported that more than 165,000 parents missed payments and faulted the Child Support Enforcement Administration for failing to use all the collection tools it had at its disposal. The state collected more than $530 million over the three years that ended last October, mostly from garnished wages, the audit said.
NEWS
By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
A Baltimore man was sentenced Friday for his role in the death of a witness in a bank fraud investigation. Frank Marfo, 28, received life in prison after being convicted of murder, gun, and fraud conspiracy charges. The victim, 19-year-old Isaiah Callaway, had been accused of working for Marfo and his partner, Tavon Davis, 25, who had concocted a scheme to hire homeless men to steal rent checks and deposit them in fake bank accounts, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. Callaway was arrested by Baltimore County Police opening one of the bank accounts and was later killed on Davis' orders, fearing Callaway would cooperate with the police, officials said.
NEWS
November 3, 2012
I will be voting in favor of gay marriage come Election Day. Here are my sentiments on the subject in poetry form. Ah, this too shall pass - all the fuss about marriage. Cast to the dogs everyday - that institution - by married men and women - fighting over children like dogs barking over bones - fighting over house keys, car keys, bank accounts - airing tons of grievances for onlookers and lawyers as spectator sport before laying to rest in divorce caskets their vows - "In sickness and in health, for better or worse, for richer or poorer," a bunch of lies rolled out for the ceremonies in church.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2012
The fraud scheme — hiring homeless people to steal rent checks and deposit them in fake bank accounts — made a million dollars for Tavon Davis before one of his associates was caught on the job. Panicked at the notion that his man might flip, he ordered Isiah Callaway killed. Davis thought he might go to jail for decades for fraud, according to court records, and Callaway, 19, was dead before Davis realized the penalty for operating the scheme would have been much less. Davis, who now faces a likely 35 years in prison after pleading guilty to murder-conspiracy charges, told a friend that his decision to order the killing made him the "schmuck of the year," according to court filings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Lois W. Uram, a retired Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co. accountant, died Oct. 9 of complications from dementia at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. She was 82. The daughter of a certified public accountant and a homemaker, Lois A. Weidemuller was born and raised in Bellevue, Pa., where she graduated in 1949 from Bellevue High School. She studied bookkeeping at night in Pittsburgh while working for the Federal Reserve Bank there. In 1955, she married John Uram, who taught in Baltimore County public schools, and the couple moved to Arbutus.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The owner-operator of a cosmetics company in Beltsville pleaded guilty Thursday to income tax evasion, prosecutors said. Bae Soo "Chris" Chon, 49, funneled revenue from Mirage Cosmetics Inc. into foreign bank accounts in Hong Kong and Seoul and understated his income on his personal income tax returns in 2008 and 2009, the U.S. Attorney's Office for Maryland said in a statement. Mirage manufactured cosmetics at a facility on Tucker Street in Beltsville and then sold the products in the United States at chain stores, including Walgreens, Target and Costco, the statement said.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley did his job Tuesday night in Charlotte. He fired up the party faithful with a call and response: "Forward, Not Back. " He hit the Republican nominee hard on his Swiss bank accounts - reinforcing a campaign message that Mitt Romney isn't like the rest of middle class America. And he gave an enthusiastic, high-volume endorsement of President Barack Obama - along with a little Maryland history thrown in for good measure. Governor O'Malley got the crowd revved up to reach even greater heights during the speeches by San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro and First Lady Michelle Obama.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Maryland has a new child support enforcement director, a hire that comes about three months after the office was skewered in a legislative audit that said it failed to collect more than $1.7 billion in support over three years. Taking over the Child Support Enforcement Administration is Joseph J. DiPrimio, who ran Philadelphia's Family Court operations, including its child support enforcement programs, and is a retired court administrator of that city's courts. Secretary of Human Resources Ted Dallas said he brought in a new executive director in a push to take the state's child support enforcement from its middling position nationwide into the top 10 states within 18 months.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
Maryland regulators said Wednesday that they have suspended the license of a Crofton-based title company after learning that more than $1 million meant to be held aside for real estate transactions was instead used to pay business expenses. John J. Dwyer and Joseph C. Hughes, co-owners of Beltway Title and Abstract Inc. and related settlement companies, did not appear at a hearing Wednesday to defend themselves, the Maryland Insurance Administration said. Licenses for all the firms were suspended.
NEWS
By Walter Olson | May 29, 2012
Laws are like fine nets, catching the common fish even as the biggest push their way through. Or so you might think on learning of how federal prosecutors keep nabbing small and medium-size businesspeople who violate an obscure law relating to bank paperwork, even as the best-known violator of the law so far (a certain well-connected politico named Eliot Spitzer) walks free. Last month, the feds swooped down on a successful Maryland dairy business, South Mountain Creamery, seizing $70,000 in its bank accounts and formally charging its owners, Randy and Karen Sowers, with the offense of bank "structuring.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
A civilian employee of the U.S. Navy who for years sold government scrap metal from Naval installations for a personal profit was sentenced in federal court Wednesday to 30 months in prison for the scheme, according to U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein. Christopher M. Hill, 47, of Lusby, who handled recycling and scraps for the Patuxent River Naval Air Station and other military installations, was also ordered by Chief U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow to pay more than $630,000 in restitution to the Navy and almost $135,000 in restitution to the IRS. According to a plea agreement in the case, a private contractor collected scrap metal owned by the government — but Hill had the firm submit payments for those scraps directly to him. Between 2004 and 2010, Hill deposited 124 checks from the company into his personal bank accounts, and did not report the earnings to the IRS. In a statement, Robert Craig, special agent in charge for the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, one of the agencies involved in the investigation, said Hill's arrest shows those agencies and Rosenstein's office "will doggedly investigate and prosecute those that decide to break the rules — or make-up their own rules — to steal and cheat from the Department of Defense.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.