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By New York Times News Service | March 27, 1994
GASINCI, Croatia -- While the world's attention has been focused on the cease-fire in Sarajevo and diplomatic moves to broker peace elsewhere in the shattered former Yugoslavia, a savage Serbian campaign to drive Muslims and Croats from land seized in the last two years is continuing, even growing, in the Banja Luka region of northern Bosnia."
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Acrid cigarette smoke hovered in the room of the Book Lovers' Club of Banja Luka, with its worn wicker chairs, steady clink of small coffee cups, noisy chatter and shelves of well-thumbed Serbian literature.Groups of unemployed teachers, unpublished writers, journalists and others who pass for the intellectual lights of a small Bosnian city, most in threadbare coats, gathered to ward off an unseasonable chill and to escape from the political debacle that has engulfed Serbian-held Bosnia.
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NEWS
August 10, 1993
Cardinal Guido del Mestri, 82, a member of the Roman Curia, died yesterday in a clinic in Nuremberg, Germany. He was a Vatican diplomat who became an archbishop in 1961. He served as papal nuncio to West Germany from 1975 to 1984, before Pope John Paul II named him to the College of Cardinals in 1991. He was born in Banja Luka in Bosnia-Herzegovina, studied at a Jesuit college and at the Gregorian University in Rome and was ordained in Rome in 1936.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- NATO-led peacekeepers seized yesterday four key television transmitters controlled by hard-line Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, putting his party's television station off the air because it had refused to end attacks against international organizations working in Bosnia.The troops surrounded the transmitters in an early-morning operation that came in response to broadcasts Sunday night suggesting that the United Nations war crimes tribunal is anti-Serb.
NEWS
By Roy Gutman and Roy Gutman,Newsday | July 23, 1992
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- In their zeal to "cleanse" northern Bosnia of its Muslims and Croats, Serbs who seized control of the region have deported thousands of unarmed civilians in sealed freight trains in the past month.Hundreds of women, children and old people have been packed into each freight car for sweltering journeys into central Bosnia lasting three or more days, according to refugees who survived the ordeal."There was no food, no water and no fresh air," said Began Fazlip.
NEWS
March 12, 1994
U.N. officials lamented what Bosnian Serbs had done in their northern stronghold of BANJA LUKA. "The security situation of Muslims and Croats in Banja Luka remains the most horrifying of anywhere in Bosnia.... It's a virtual terror zone, like some gigantic Warsaw ghetto," one said.The United States will send about 200 more troops to the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia in order to free Scandinavian troops for duty in Bosnia, U.S. officials said in WASHINGTON.Bosnian Croat forces flew 20 new soldiers across front lines into VITEZ on a medical evacuation helicopter in the first violation of a cease-fire between Muslims and Croats in the area, according to U.N. officials.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1995
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Croats and Muslims in this Serbian-held city in northern Bosnia are being forcibly evicted from their homes in acts of revenge by some of more than 100,000 Serbian refugees who fled their territory in Croatia last weekend in a rout by Croatian forces, relief officials said yesterday.A Roman Catholic bishop said in an interview here that gangs of armed Serbian refugees had hunted down Croats in Muslim neighborhoods in the city, threatening to kill the occupants if they did not leave immediately.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- NATO-led peacekeepers seized yesterday four key television transmitters controlled by hard-line Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, putting his party's television station off the air because it had refused to end attacks against international organizations working in Bosnia.The troops surrounded the transmitters in an early-morning operation that came in response to broadcasts Sunday night suggesting that the United Nations war crimes tribunal is anti-Serb.
NEWS
September 20, 1995
AMERICA'S INVOLVEMENT in foreign wars invariably has consequences -- some good, some bad, virtually all unintended or unforeseen. History generally judges the outcome of World War I a disappointment, of World War II a success; of Vietnam a failure, of the Persian Gulf war a victory.It is, of course, far too early to know the results of the U.S. intervention in the ethnic wars of the former Yugoslavia. But at this stage, this much is clear: By coming forcefully to the aid of the Muslim-Croatian alliance against the Bosnian Serbs, Washington has materially changed the balance of power in favor of the alliance.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1995
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The Bosnian Serbs earned a second 72-hour reprieve from NATO bombing yesterday by pulling back heavy weapons around Sarajevo, but a continuing Bosnian army and Croat offensive in northwest Bosnia raised fears that recent tentative moves toward peace could unravel.United Nations and NATO commanders, who had stopped the bombing of Bosnian Serb positions on the condition that the Serbs withdraw most of their big guns on the heights around Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital, said that the Serbs had made "substantial progress" and that the bombing pause would be extended for another 72 hours.
NEWS
August 22, 1997
WHEN 350 heavily armed British and Czech soldiers, supported by United States helicopter gunships, invaded and disarmed six Bosnian Serb police stations in Banja Luka on Wednesday, they accomplished several things. The most decisive was dismembering the little Bosnian Serb republic of Srpska into two fiercely rival enclaves.In northern Bosnia, Biljana Plavsic is recognized as president, though without loyal forces. The other enclave is centered on Pale in eastern Bosnia, where the former president and indicted war criminal, Radovan Karadzic, rules as undisputed boss.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 1996
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Borivoje Sendic, local political boss for the party of accused war criminal Radovan Karadzic, is tired of hearing there's no democracy in Bosnia's Serbian Republic.So what if a few political rabble rousers have been beaten up, or if state television never lets opponents on the air. More important, he says with obvious pride, is that "not a single opposition leader has been questioned at the police station."Such are the low standards for democracy in a place where international observers have compiled a detailed list of recent beatings, bombings, disruptions and, yes, police interrogations, all directed against opposition parties and their supporters.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 29, 1996
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- We went fishing in Bosnia the other day.Nothing was biting but the police.I guess I should explain. I was traveling with colleague Tom Hundley of the Chicago Tribune on a warm and sunny Sunday evening in Banja Luka, the heart of Bosnian Serb territory. With no interviews on the horizon until Monday morning, we decided to head south, to the steep green gorge of the Vrbas River. With its sheer rock faces and rolling white rapids, it's as inviting as any stretch of trout water in the southern Appalachians.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1995
ZAGREB, Croatia -- Two senior Western officials said yesterday that they had evidence that thousands of Muslim men and boys may have been killed over the last week or so by Bosnian Serbs in a contested area of northwest Bosnia. They said such killings, in the area around Banja Luka, might be continuing even now.The reported killings of men and boys who were detained by Serbian paramilitary forces, as they expelled women, children and the elderly into Muslim-held territory, may involve "several thousand" people, according to senior Western officials.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 11, 1995
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- As a long-sought cease-fire was delayed yet again yesterday, Serbs were undertaking a huge new "ethnic cleansing" campaign around their stronghold, Banja Luka, expelling thousands of women, children and the elderly and leading thousands of men away to uncertain fates, United Nations officials said.The Bosnian government, complaining that gas and electricity had not been sufficiently restored to Sarajevo, said it would delay a cease-fire in its war with Bosnian Serbs for at least another day.In the past four days, as a cease-fire was thought to be drawing near, 10,000 Muslims and Croats were reported to have been driven from their homes around Bosanski Novi, Sanski Most and Prijedor.
NEWS
September 20, 1995
AMERICA'S INVOLVEMENT in foreign wars invariably has consequences -- some good, some bad, virtually all unintended or unforeseen. History generally judges the outcome of World War I a disappointment, of World War II a success; of Vietnam a failure, of the Persian Gulf war a victory.It is, of course, far too early to know the results of the U.S. intervention in the ethnic wars of the former Yugoslavia. But at this stage, this much is clear: By coming forcefully to the aid of the Muslim-Croatian alliance against the Bosnian Serbs, Washington has materially changed the balance of power in favor of the alliance.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1995
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The Bosnian Serbs earned a second 72-hour reprieve from NATO bombing yesterday by pulling back heavy weapons around Sarajevo, but a continuing Bosnian army and Croat offensive in northwest Bosnia raised fears that recent tentative moves toward peace could unravel.United Nations and NATO commanders, who had stopped the bombing of Bosnian Serb positions on the condition that the Serbs withdraw most of their big guns on the heights around Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital, said that the Serbs had made "substantial progress" and that the bombing pause would be extended for another 72 hours.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1995
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Croats and Muslims in this Serbian-held city in northern Bosnia are being forcibly evicted from their homes in acts of revenge by some of more than 100,000 Serbian refugees who fled their territory in Croatia last weekend in a rout by Croatian forces, relief officials said yesterday.A Roman Catholic bishop said in an interview here that gangs of armed Serbian refugees had hunted down Croats in Muslim neighborhoods in the city, threatening to kill the occupants if they did not leave immediately.
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