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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 25, 1994
BIDDEFORD, Maine -- They sit before Jim Baines, more than 100 wiggling, giggling eighth-graders with an innocence he envies.Their minds are on the social studies test later that day, on nail polish, on Christmas vacation.In a moment, though, he will have their rapt attention. They don't meet many killers.And so he tells his story again.When he was 15, he says, he helped throw a man off a bridge to his death in Bangor, 150 miles to the north.He had never seen the man before, and the man had done absolutely nothing to provoke the attack.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | November 27, 2006
Roger Bowman, up in Aberdeen, takes pen to paper to propose additions to our Weather Page, including forecasts for Bangor, Maine., so that "when we HERE see snow THERE, we feel lucky." I like the way you think, Rog. He also asks my opinion of the Hagers-town Almanack's weather prognosticator. They call him a "conjecturer." Conjecture means "guesswork." Forecasting daily weather five to 17 months in advance is fun, but it's voodoo. Sometimes the conjecturer is right; but so is a stopped clock.
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NEWS
October 30, 2004
On October 25, 2004, ALICE K. WOLF (nee Kimberly), of Bangor, PA, formerly of Balto and Chestertown, MD, loving wife of the late George Van Velsor Wolf, beloved mother of Constance Fowlkes, of Bangor, PA, G. Van Velsor Wolf Jr., of Phoenix, AR, and Timothy G. Wolf, of Ellicott City, MD. Also survived by eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Funeral Service from the Reed/Gaffney Funeral Home, Bangor, PA, on Saturday, October 30 at 10 A.M. A Memorial Service will be held Monday, November 1, at 11 a.m., at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 811 Cathedral St., Balto.
NEWS
September 28, 2005
On September 24, 2005, in Edmond, OK, STEWART G. WOLF JR., M.D., beloved husband of Barbara Wolf (nee Howell) and the late Virginia Wolf (nee Danforth); devoted father of Angeline W. Gloria, her husband James and their children Joe and Rose of Bangor, PA, Thomas D. Wolf, his wife Peggy of Bangor, PA and their son Nicolas of Durango, CO and the late Stewart G. Wolf III, his wife Maggy and their son Tom of New Orleans, LA; stepfather of Janet Holt of Oklahoma City, OK and her children Melissa Chavis of Norman, OK, Christopher Chavis of New York City and James A. Young of Oklahoma City, OK; uncle of George Thomsen, Timothy Wolf and Grace Babcock of Baltimore, Van Wolf of Phoenix, AZ and Constance Fowlkes of Bangor, PA. Also survived by many great-nieces and nephews.
NEWS
November 20, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Louise G. Alessi, a nurse who had been a parliamentarian and a member of women's clubs, will be offered at 9 a.m. today at the Roman Catholic Church of the Nativity, 1809 Vista Lane in Timonium.Mrs. Alessi, who was 79 and lived on Bramleigh Road in Timonium, died Friday at St. Joseph Hospital after a stroke.A registered parliamentarian who worked at meetings and taught parliamentary procedure, she was parliamentarian and former president of the Maryland Association of Parliamentarians.
NEWS
September 28, 2005
On September 24, 2005, in Edmond, OK, STEWART G. WOLF JR., M.D., beloved husband of Barbara Wolf (nee Howell) and the late Virginia Wolf (nee Danforth); devoted father of Angeline W. Gloria, her husband James and their children Joe and Rose of Bangor, PA, Thomas D. Wolf, his wife Peggy of Bangor, PA and their son Nicolas of Durango, CO and the late Stewart G. Wolf III, his wife Maggy and their son Tom of New Orleans, LA; stepfather of Janet Holt of Oklahoma City, OK and her children Melissa Chavis of Norman, OK, Christopher Chavis of New York City and James A. Young of Oklahoma City, OK; uncle of George Thomsen, Timothy Wolf and Grace Babcock of Baltimore, Van Wolf of Phoenix, AZ and Constance Fowlkes of Bangor, PA. Also survived by many great-nieces and nephews.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | November 27, 2006
Roger Bowman, up in Aberdeen, takes pen to paper to propose additions to our Weather Page, including forecasts for Bangor, Maine., so that "when we HERE see snow THERE, we feel lucky." I like the way you think, Rog. He also asks my opinion of the Hagers-town Almanack's weather prognosticator. They call him a "conjecturer." Conjecture means "guesswork." Forecasting daily weather five to 17 months in advance is fun, but it's voodoo. Sometimes the conjecturer is right; but so is a stopped clock.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | August 22, 1994
This is Baker Mission Control. It's a command center in my head. I sit here and track my children whenever they travel.The call comes at noon. Daddy? It's Emily, reporting in. The van's delivered her safely to the airport in Bangor, Me. We haven't heard from her since dropping her off at Outward Bound three weeks ago.How was your sailing course? Great. Call us again when you get to Newark. Okay. Remember, you haven't got much time to catch your connecting flight to Baltimore. Okay.But the next call comes from Bangor, too. Her plane is delayed an hour.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1999
BANGOR, Maine -- If Paul Revere ever shouted "The British are coming!" in this neck of the woods, it most likely happened during a moment of panic in 1779, when he turned tail and ran. And if the fleeing patriot left anything behind, it may yet be awaiting rescue at the bottom of the murky Penobscot River.That's what archaeologist Warren Riess and a bunch of local historians are hoping. They recently began planning to search in earnest for such artifacts, although the items would be a reminder of one of the worst disasters in U.S. naval history.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1995
Call it the long goodbye.The temperature is still warm. We will most likely still have days where the entire outdoors feels like one awful sauna that curls every hair on your head without benefit of an expensive perm. And when the mere mention of pantyhose is enough to send grown women into a frenzy."I don't see any end to it," says Carmen Beckles of Frederick.But face it, the end is near. The days are numbered. Get ready to say adieu to summer.It can't happen soon enough for plenty of people -- particularly the ones without air-conditioning.
NEWS
October 30, 2004
On October 25, 2004, ALICE K. WOLF (nee Kimberly), of Bangor, PA, formerly of Balto and Chestertown, MD, loving wife of the late George Van Velsor Wolf, beloved mother of Constance Fowlkes, of Bangor, PA, G. Van Velsor Wolf Jr., of Phoenix, AR, and Timothy G. Wolf, of Ellicott City, MD. Also survived by eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Funeral Service from the Reed/Gaffney Funeral Home, Bangor, PA, on Saturday, October 30 at 10 A.M. A Memorial Service will be held Monday, November 1, at 11 a.m., at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 811 Cathedral St., Balto.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1999
BANGOR, Maine -- If Paul Revere ever shouted "The British are coming!" in this neck of the woods, it most likely happened during a moment of panic in 1779, when he turned tail and ran. And if the fleeing patriot left anything behind, it may yet be awaiting rescue at the bottom of the murky Penobscot River.That's what archaeologist Warren Riess and a bunch of local historians are hoping. They recently began planning to search in earnest for such artifacts, although the items would be a reminder of one of the worst disasters in U.S. naval history.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1999
BANGOR, Maine -- Call it the season of rage that put Bangor on the map, and begin with the episode of Englishman Bryan Neal.On a flight out of Orlando in May, the homeward-bound Neal had a few too many drinks, smashed a video screen and began ramming a window, telling fellow passengers they were about to "get sucked out and die." The crew strapped him down and dropped him off in Bangor.Three weeks later came the case of apparent drug smuggler Nicardo Wallvin Blake, who was using the name Shabiyah Negus Davidson.
FEATURES
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | August 24, 1997
The sun is bright on the slippery elms, bitternut hickorys and staghorn sumacs late into the evening of June 21, sparking nutrients to stream to the tiniest leaf on the farthest twig.The sugar maples, white ash and bigtooth aspen also bask in the warmth of the summer solstice, the longest day of the year.But with each passing week, the sun rises later and sets earlier. Temperatures drop. Frost settles on the ground.By mid-September, the sun-hungry green chlorophyll in leaves breaks down, unmasking underlying scarlets and golds, yellows and auburns.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1996
An unsolved Baltimore slaying of a Maine man has sparked a petition drive and a visit here yesterday by representatives of a U.S. senator who asked police to reopen their investigation.Lawrence Jones Jr. was shot to death in Southeast Baltimore on Nov. 20, 1993, shortly after he moved here from Bangor, Maine.The only child of Lawrence and Young Cha Jones, the 24-year-old Mr. Jones was shot in the eye outside his home in the 1400 block of Bank St. No arrests have been made.His death prompted a petition campaign -- with 1,651 signatures from Maine residents -- asking that the city Police Department pursue the case.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1995
Call it the long goodbye.The temperature is still warm. We will most likely still have days where the entire outdoors feels like one awful sauna that curls every hair on your head without benefit of an expensive perm. And when the mere mention of pantyhose is enough to send grown women into a frenzy."I don't see any end to it," says Carmen Beckles of Frederick.But face it, the end is near. The days are numbered. Get ready to say adieu to summer.It can't happen soon enough for plenty of people -- particularly the ones without air-conditioning.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | August 15, 1991
Glandore, Ireland -- "Brigadoon,'' said one of the Americans my wife and I met during the two weeks we rented a house overlooking the little harbor here. It is so pretty, so slow and so foreign that perhaps it did fade back in to the mists, like the mythical village in Scotland in the old Lerner and Loewe musical, when we left to return to what we are so sure is the real world.Mythical or real, Ireland, isolated from New York and California by time zones, is certainly a time zone of its own. Or, you could say, many Irish prefer the past or its pace.
FEATURES
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | August 24, 1997
The sun is bright on the slippery elms, bitternut hickorys and staghorn sumacs late into the evening of June 21, sparking nutrients to stream to the tiniest leaf on the farthest twig.The sugar maples, white ash and bigtooth aspen also bask in the warmth of the summer solstice, the longest day of the year.But with each passing week, the sun rises later and sets earlier. Temperatures drop. Frost settles on the ground.By mid-September, the sun-hungry green chlorophyll in leaves breaks down, unmasking underlying scarlets and golds, yellows and auburns.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 25, 1994
BIDDEFORD, Maine -- They sit before Jim Baines, more than 100 wiggling, giggling eighth-graders with an innocence he envies.Their minds are on the social studies test later that day, on nail polish, on Christmas vacation.In a moment, though, he will have their rapt attention. They don't meet many killers.And so he tells his story again.When he was 15, he says, he helped throw a man off a bridge to his death in Bangor, 150 miles to the north.He had never seen the man before, and the man had done absolutely nothing to provoke the attack.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | August 22, 1994
This is Baker Mission Control. It's a command center in my head. I sit here and track my children whenever they travel.The call comes at noon. Daddy? It's Emily, reporting in. The van's delivered her safely to the airport in Bangor, Me. We haven't heard from her since dropping her off at Outward Bound three weeks ago.How was your sailing course? Great. Call us again when you get to Newark. Okay. Remember, you haven't got much time to catch your connecting flight to Baltimore. Okay.But the next call comes from Bangor, too. Her plane is delayed an hour.
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