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By Janell Sutherland | October 22, 2012
An important thing happens on this week's episode of "The Amazing Race": I kind of fall in love with Abbie's Boyfriend. I know. Something else happens: We learn someone's drag queen name. I know! Let's just get on with it. Farewell, Indonesia, fourth most populated country of the world with karmic pedicabs. Time to travel to Dhaka, Bangladesh, the most densely populated city in the world (according to Phil Keoghan's Twitter feed, which I absolutely believe). Abbie and Her Boyfriend Ryan, Team Dominate, depart at 9:52 p.m. They take a cab to a travel agency.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
The facts of the case seem almost too brutal and cruel to bear. When a small boy in Bangladesh refuses the demands of a gang that wants to use him as a beggar, he is beaten and mutilated within an inch of his life. His throat is cut, his skull is bashed in and his penis is amputated. Sara Sidner, a correspondent for CNN International, tells the story of this boy and his family in an "Operation Hope" report that premieres this weekend. The story, which brings the boy and his family to Baltimore's Johns Hopkins Hospital, is what separates CNN from every other cable TV news operation on the dial.
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NEWS
By Sydney Schanberg | May 20, 1991
SOMETIMES THE WORLD landscape is filled with so many man-made and natural disasters that the mind, overwhelmed, chooses to blur them together. We distant observers do this because we feel helpless, and because it is less painful to think about mass tragedy halfway around the globe than to relate to the stark and particular miseries of individuals who, but for chance, could be ourselves.On April 30, a cyclone swept up the Bay of Bengal and pushed a tidal wave at least 20 feet high across the islands and vulnerable coastline of Bangladesh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | November 5, 2012
Last week, the teams stayed in Bangladesh and got very hot. The Twins somehow failed to fall for Boyfriend Ryan's nerdy charm, and the Goat Farmers came in last but were spared from elimination by a benevolent Phil and a pretty woman at the Pit Stop. The next destination is Istanbul (not Constantinople). Did you know that Istanbul (not Constantinople) is the only metropolis in the world that stands on two continents? Europe and Asia. How cool is that? Any final thoughts about Bangladesh, teams?
NEWS
By Nurul Alam and Laura King and Nurul Alam and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 2007
CHITTAGONG, BANGLADESH -- After weeks of mounting political violence, Bangladesh's president declared a nationwide state of emergency yesterday and indefinitely postponed elections that had been scheduled to take place in less than two weeks. President Iajuddin Ahmed also said he would step down as interim head of a caretaker administration in the impoverished South Asian nation but would retain the largely ceremonial post of president. No new date was set for nationwide balloting that had been scheduled to take place Jan. 22. "It is not possible to hold the elections on schedule," Ahmed said on national television.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 1991
Travelers in South Asia, a region rich in handicrafts, can easily overlook the intriguing folk arts of Bangladesh, a small country not on the tourist map.Barry Ison, a Bangladeshi-born Australian, has made ethnic crafts chic at the shop called Ideas, which he runs in Dhaka's fashionable Gulshan neighborhood as a self-help project for the poor rural women who produce the goods.Ideas sells soft leather purses (from about $11) and briefcases (up to $65), pottery pieces starting at only a few dollars, hand-woven linens (a place mat and napkin set in traditional patterns is under $10)
NEWS
By HERBERT H. WERLIN | January 29, 1991
If you had visited the island of Singapore in 1959, you wouldhave found one of the world's worst housing situations. Nearly three-fourths of the population of about 1.5 million were packed into the central area of the city, with ten or more families often living above the traditional low-rise shops. At the same time, between 250,000 and 300,000 people lived on the city's outskirts in squatter settlements, usually without sanitation and other requirements.Go now! You will find more than 85 percent of the population in government-financed apartments, most of which are owner-occupied.
NEWS
By NURUL ALAM AND PAUL WATSON and NURUL ALAM AND PAUL WATSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 2005
CHITTAGONG, Bangladesh -- Two suicide bombers targeting courthouses killed at least seven people yesterday in escalating violence blamed on Muslim extremists demanding an Islamic state. Two police officers were among those who died in the blasts in this southeastern port city and Gazipur, 20 miles north of Dhaka, the capital. More than 50 people were wounded, 20 critically. The coordinated suicide bombings were the first such attacks in Bangladesh, where security forces have been struggling to stop increasingly sophisticated assaults and bring the masterminds to justice.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 26, 2007
DHAKA, Bangladesh -- The political storm that preceded nature's latest assault on this country still swirls overhead. Nearly a year into an army-backed state of emergency, basic freedoms remain suspended, a sweeping anti-corruption drive has stuffed the jails with some of Bangladesh's most influential business leaders and politicians, and a fragile economy is tottering under the pressure of floods at home and rising oil prices abroad. The soaring cost of food is potentially the most explosive challenge facing the military-backed government that has run this country since Jan. 11, when, after debilitating political protests, scheduled elections were scrapped and emergency law was imposed.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | May 29, 1991
BECAUSE I WOULD like this to be a kinder and gentler nation, I have sworn off Quayle-bashing effective immediately. We can't have a kinder and gentler nation if people get their blood pressure up, which happens every time I mention the vice president.His admirers grab their pens and write things like: "Hah! If you think you are so smart, why are you a lowly columnist and not a vice president? Shame on you." (Ross Jones, Corpus Christi, Texas.)"Your rabid jealousy of a man who is smarter, richer, more successful, better looking and better liked than you is no reason to write such a column.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | October 22, 2012
An important thing happens on this week's episode of "The Amazing Race": I kind of fall in love with Abbie's Boyfriend. I know. Something else happens: We learn someone's drag queen name. I know! Let's just get on with it. Farewell, Indonesia, fourth most populated country of the world with karmic pedicabs. Time to travel to Dhaka, Bangladesh, the most densely populated city in the world (according to Phil Keoghan's Twitter feed, which I absolutely believe). Abbie and Her Boyfriend Ryan, Team Dominate, depart at 9:52 p.m. They take a cab to a travel agency.
NEWS
By Michael L. Buckler | January 30, 2011
The Peace Corps has endured a rough month. On Jan. 18, the Corps lost Sargent Shriver, its charismatic architect and first leader. The previous Friday, ABC News ran a grizzly story on violence against Peace Corps volunteers — Jess Smochek was gang-raped in Bangladesh in 2004; Kate Puzey was murdered in Benin in 2009. This raises the question: Has Mr. Shriver's Peace Corps become too dangerous for volunteers? There's no question that in male-dominated, developing countries, the Peace Corps experience is often more harrowing for women than men. Approximately 0.5 percent of female volunteers become rape victims in the Peace Corps (during the two-year service commitment)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 3, 2009
Dr. Michael A. Koenig, an international expert in partner violence and child abuse in developing countries, died of cancer Jan. 27 at his Roland Park home. He was 56. Born and raised in Ishpeming, Mich., he earned a bachelor's degree from Colgate University in 1974. In 1976, he earned a master's degree in sociology from the University of Michigan, and he earned a doctorate in population planning in 1981, also from the University of Michigan School of Graduate Studies. From 1981 to 1983, he was a postdoctoral fellow in population dynamics at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, where he completed a series of studies on adolescent pregnancy and contraceptive use in the United States.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 26, 2007
DHAKA, Bangladesh -- The political storm that preceded nature's latest assault on this country still swirls overhead. Nearly a year into an army-backed state of emergency, basic freedoms remain suspended, a sweeping anti-corruption drive has stuffed the jails with some of Bangladesh's most influential business leaders and politicians, and a fragile economy is tottering under the pressure of floods at home and rising oil prices abroad. The soaring cost of food is potentially the most explosive challenge facing the military-backed government that has run this country since Jan. 11, when, after debilitating political protests, scheduled elections were scrapped and emergency law was imposed.
NEWS
By Nurul Alam and Laura King and Nurul Alam and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 2007
CHITTAGONG, BANGLADESH -- After weeks of mounting political violence, Bangladesh's president declared a nationwide state of emergency yesterday and indefinitely postponed elections that had been scheduled to take place in less than two weeks. President Iajuddin Ahmed also said he would step down as interim head of a caretaker administration in the impoverished South Asian nation but would retain the largely ceremonial post of president. No new date was set for nationwide balloting that had been scheduled to take place Jan. 22. "It is not possible to hold the elections on schedule," Ahmed said on national television.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
He was just a humble bookkeeper at a tiny bank in one of the world's poorest countries. So it never occurred to Asif Dowla that he was part of something that would someday change the world. When Dowla worked for five months at what would become the Grameen Bank of Bangladesh back in the late 1970s, it had just two other employees and served a few tiny villages. But the bank's founder had an idea. Dowla was recruited for the job by his doctoral thesis adviser at Bangladesh's Chittagong University, Professor Muhammad Yunus, who won the Nobel Peace Prize yesterday.
NEWS
By Bob Drogin and Bob Drogin,Los Angeles Times | May 5, 1991
RAHAMATPUR, Bangladesh -- Rahamatpur means "blessinof God" in Arabic, but for Minul Islam Belal and his neighbors, this impoverished hamlet now seems cursed from hell. Mr. Belal's entire extended family -- 35 people in all -- was washed out to sea or crushed under falling buildings when Tuesday's cyclone smashed ashore here with unimaginable force."Why do I live and they all die?" Mr. Belal, a 28-year-old farmer, asked yesterday. "What do I have to live for? This is my question. This is my tragedy."
NEWS
March 8, 1996
THERE WERE slayings and other irregularities in Bangladesh's recent election. Yet it was uncontested, with total victory for Prime Minister Khaleda Zia's Bangladesh National Party (BNP) last month.Opposition leader Sheik Hasina's denunciation of the government has resonance but her call for a caretaker regime will be ignored, as for the most part was her support of a general strike. Some fear the army will take over, but it currently leaves politics to the quarreling women. Meanwhile, stereotypes are shattered.
NEWS
By MARIANA MINAYA and MARIANA MINAYA,SUN REPORTER | January 20, 2006
When Dr. Marcella L. Roenneburg first decided to take her daughter to work two years ago, it was more than the usual trip downtown to mom's office at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. The two crammed their suitcases with surgical gloves, sutures and soap and flew 5,000 miles to a primitive operating room in the impoverished West African country of Niger. Last fall, the destination was Bangladesh. Clad in surgical masks and scrubs, mother and 16-year-old daughter tended to girls who have suffered devastating wounds of pregnancy - wounds that can turn them into social outcasts.
NEWS
By NURUL ALAM AND PAUL WATSON and NURUL ALAM AND PAUL WATSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 2005
CHITTAGONG, Bangladesh -- Two suicide bombers targeting courthouses killed at least seven people yesterday in escalating violence blamed on Muslim extremists demanding an Islamic state. Two police officers were among those who died in the blasts in this southeastern port city and Gazipur, 20 miles north of Dhaka, the capital. More than 50 people were wounded, 20 critically. The coordinated suicide bombings were the first such attacks in Bangladesh, where security forces have been struggling to stop increasingly sophisticated assaults and bring the masterminds to justice.
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