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November 5, 1991
Dr. Kamal Mukhi, an anesthesiologist at the Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly, died Sunday at the Shock-Trauma Unit in Baltimore after being injured in an automobile accident Oct. 21.She was 48 and lived in Columbia, where her husband, Dr. Prakash Mukhi, is a dentist.Services for Dr. Mukhi were being held today at the Fleck funeral establishment in Laurel.A member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, she also belonged to the American Medical Association and the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland.
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August 29, 2011
Charles Campbell, former senior vice-president of the Gulf Oil Corporation says in his letter to the editor ("Free trade destroying the American economy," Aug 23 ) that the American economy is languishing because jobs meant for the American people are now in Bangalore, India, at Infosys, Wipro and Tata, and in China, at Foxconn, an electronics manufacturing giant. His is a myopic rant that doesn't take into account the skills gap that is part of the picture in this country. Although this gap, a global mismatch of talent to jobs available, India and China, it is already here.
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TRAVEL
By VANI RANGACHAR and VANI RANGACHAR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 11, 2006
BANGALORE, INDIA -- On our visits home to Bangalore when I was a child, my mom toted giant jars of Skippy so my siblings and I could have peanut butter sandwiches. My grandmother bought her vegetables fresh from a cart that a skinny, muscular man pushed through the street, and milk was sold, still warm, by a man who milked the water buffalo in front of her house. When we went touring outside the city, it was only to visit ancient temple after ancient temple. These were some of the sureties of my India.
NEWS
By HENRY CHU | July 12, 2006
NEW DELHI -- With frightening precision, eight explosions in rapid succession struck a busy commuter railway last night in Bombay, the financial capital of India, and turning the rush hour into a grisly tableau of carnage. The Press Trust of India news agency said early today that authorities had increased the toll to 190 killed and 625 injured. In what officials said was a well-coordinated attack, the blasts went off within minutes of each other in trains and on platforms along the length of a rail line carrying thousands of passengers home to the western and northern suburbs of Bombay.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | August 13, 2002
BANGALORE, India -- Two months ago, India and Pakistan appeared headed for a nuclear war. Colin Powell, the U.S. secretary of state and a former general, played a key role in talking the two parties back from the brink. But here in India, I've discovered that there was another new, and fascinating, set of pressures that restrained the Indian government and made nuclear war, from its side, unthinkable. Quite simply, India's huge software and information technology industry, which has emerged over the last decade and made India the back-room and research hub of many of the world's largest corporations, essentially told the nationalist Indian government to cool it. And the government here got the message and has sought to de-escalate ever since.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - My favorite building in Bangalore, India's Silicon Valley, is a corporate complex called the "Golden Enclave." In some ways, the whole tech sector in Bangalore could be called India's Golden Enclave - disconnected from the country's bad governance, as companies create their own walled enclaves, with their own electricity, bus service, telecommunications and security, and disconnected from the countryside, where many Indians still live in...
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 9, 2004
BANGALORE, India - Yamini Narayanan is an Indian-born 35-year-old with a doctorate in economics from the University of Oklahoma. After graduation, she worked for a U.S. computer company in Virginia and recently moved back to Bangalore with her husband to be closer to family. When I asked her how she felt about the outsourcing of jobs from her adopted country, America, to her native country, India, she responded with a revealing story: "I just read about a guy in America who lost his job to India, and he made a T-shirt that said, `I lost my job to India and all I got was this [lousy]
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 12, 2004
BANGALORE, India - Nine years ago, as Japan was beating America's brains out in the auto industry, I wrote a column about playing a computer geography game with my daughter, then 9 years old. I was trying to help her with a clue that clearly pointed to Detroit, so I asked her: "Where are cars made?" And she answered, "Japan." Ouch. Well, I was reminded of that story while visiting an Indian software design firm in Bangalore, Global Edge. The company's marketing manager, Rajesh Rao, told me he had just made a cold call to the vice president for engineering of a U.S. company, trying to drum up business.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 24, 2004
BANGALORE, India -- We grew up with the hippies in the 1960s. Thanks to the high-tech revolution, many of us became yuppies in the 1980s. And now, fasten your seat belt, because you may soon lose your job to a "zippie" in the 2000s. "The Zippies Are Here," declared the Indian weekly magazine Outlook. Zippies are this huge cohort of Indian youths who are the first to come of age since India shifted away from socialism and dived headfirst into global trade, the information revolution and turning itself into the world's service center.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 27, 2004
BANGALORE, India - I've been in India for only a few days and I am already thinking about reincarnation. In my next life, I want to be a demagogue. Yes, I want to be able to huff and puff about complex issues - such as outsourcing of jobs to India - without any reference to reality. Unfortunately, in this life, I'm stuck in the body of a reporter/columnist. So when I came to the 24/7 Customer call center in Bangalore to observe hundreds of Indian young people doing service jobs via long distance - answering the phones for U.S. firms, providing technical support for U.S. computer giants or selling credit cards for global banks - I was prepared to denounce the whole thing.
TRAVEL
By VANI RANGACHAR and VANI RANGACHAR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 11, 2006
BANGALORE, INDIA -- On our visits home to Bangalore when I was a child, my mom toted giant jars of Skippy so my siblings and I could have peanut butter sandwiches. My grandmother bought her vegetables fresh from a cart that a skinny, muscular man pushed through the street, and milk was sold, still warm, by a man who milked the water buffalo in front of her house. When we went touring outside the city, it was only to visit ancient temple after ancient temple. These were some of the sureties of my India.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - My favorite building in Bangalore, India's Silicon Valley, is a corporate complex called the "Golden Enclave." In some ways, the whole tech sector in Bangalore could be called India's Golden Enclave - disconnected from the country's bad governance, as companies create their own walled enclaves, with their own electricity, bus service, telecommunications and security, and disconnected from the countryside, where many Indians still live in...
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 12, 2004
BANGALORE, India - Nine years ago, as Japan was beating America's brains out in the auto industry, I wrote a column about playing a computer geography game with my daughter, then 9 years old. I was trying to help her with a clue that clearly pointed to Detroit, so I asked her: "Where are cars made?" And she answered, "Japan." Ouch. Well, I was reminded of that story while visiting an Indian software design firm in Bangalore, Global Edge. The company's marketing manager, Rajesh Rao, told me he had just made a cold call to the vice president for engineering of a U.S. company, trying to drum up business.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 9, 2004
BANGALORE, India - Yamini Narayanan is an Indian-born 35-year-old with a doctorate in economics from the University of Oklahoma. After graduation, she worked for a U.S. computer company in Virginia and recently moved back to Bangalore with her husband to be closer to family. When I asked her how she felt about the outsourcing of jobs from her adopted country, America, to her native country, India, she responded with a revealing story: "I just read about a guy in America who lost his job to India, and he made a T-shirt that said, `I lost my job to India and all I got was this [lousy]
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 27, 2004
BANGALORE, India - I've been in India for only a few days and I am already thinking about reincarnation. In my next life, I want to be a demagogue. Yes, I want to be able to huff and puff about complex issues - such as outsourcing of jobs to India - without any reference to reality. Unfortunately, in this life, I'm stuck in the body of a reporter/columnist. So when I came to the 24/7 Customer call center in Bangalore to observe hundreds of Indian young people doing service jobs via long distance - answering the phones for U.S. firms, providing technical support for U.S. computer giants or selling credit cards for global banks - I was prepared to denounce the whole thing.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 24, 2004
BANGALORE, India -- We grew up with the hippies in the 1960s. Thanks to the high-tech revolution, many of us became yuppies in the 1980s. And now, fasten your seat belt, because you may soon lose your job to a "zippie" in the 2000s. "The Zippies Are Here," declared the Indian weekly magazine Outlook. Zippies are this huge cohort of Indian youths who are the first to come of age since India shifted away from socialism and dived headfirst into global trade, the information revolution and turning itself into the world's service center.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | August 15, 2002
BANGALORE, India -- The more time you spend in India, the more you realize that this teeming, multiethnic, multireligious, multilingual country is one of the world's great wonders -- a miracle with message. And the message is that democracy matters. This truth hits you from every corner. Consider Bangalore, where the traffic is now congested by all the young Indian techies, many from the lower-middle classes, who have gotten jobs, apartments -- and motor scooters -- by providing the brainpower for the world's biggest corporations.
NEWS
August 29, 2011
Charles Campbell, former senior vice-president of the Gulf Oil Corporation says in his letter to the editor ("Free trade destroying the American economy," Aug 23 ) that the American economy is languishing because jobs meant for the American people are now in Bangalore, India, at Infosys, Wipro and Tata, and in China, at Foxconn, an electronics manufacturing giant. His is a myopic rant that doesn't take into account the skills gap that is part of the picture in this country. Although this gap, a global mismatch of talent to jobs available, India and China, it is already here.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | August 15, 2002
BANGALORE, India -- The more time you spend in India, the more you realize that this teeming, multiethnic, multireligious, multilingual country is one of the world's great wonders -- a miracle with message. And the message is that democracy matters. This truth hits you from every corner. Consider Bangalore, where the traffic is now congested by all the young Indian techies, many from the lower-middle classes, who have gotten jobs, apartments -- and motor scooters -- by providing the brainpower for the world's biggest corporations.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | August 13, 2002
BANGALORE, India -- Two months ago, India and Pakistan appeared headed for a nuclear war. Colin Powell, the U.S. secretary of state and a former general, played a key role in talking the two parties back from the brink. But here in India, I've discovered that there was another new, and fascinating, set of pressures that restrained the Indian government and made nuclear war, from its side, unthinkable. Quite simply, India's huge software and information technology industry, which has emerged over the last decade and made India the back-room and research hub of many of the world's largest corporations, essentially told the nationalist Indian government to cool it. And the government here got the message and has sought to de-escalate ever since.
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