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By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 31, 2004
MEULABOH, Indonesia - Four days after the killer tsunami swept away a large portion of this city of 30,000 people, aid is only beginning to arrive. The death toll is unknown, but according to military estimates there are 4,000 bodies and 7,000 missing. The quake and tsunami were known to have killed many in the provincial capital, Banda Aceh, and relief efforts had begun in greater earnest there. But Meulaboh, the city closest to the quake's epicenter, was the question mark. For days after the disaster, no one could reach the city, even by helicopter.
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By Dinda Jouhana and Richard C. Paddock and Dinda Jouhana and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 16, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - The Indonesian government and Acehnese rebel leaders signed a landmark agreement yesterday in Helsinki, Finland, that ends one of Asia's longest-running wars and brings peace to a region devastated by conflict and the Dec. 26 tsunamis. After fighting for nearly 29 years, the rebel Free Aceh Movement agreed to drop its demand for independence for Aceh province in exchange for the chance to participate in elections. The government agreed to withdraw about half of its 30,000 troops from the province, release more than 1,400 political prisoners and grant amnesty to rebels.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 9, 2005
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Two weeks after the tsunamis hit, the official death toll continues to rise, topping 150,000 yesterday as bodies were uncovered during the huge cleanup on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. At the same time, however, the international aid effort seems to have found its legs. Major relief efforts often become "chaotic," said Pat Johns, the emergency response coordinator for Catholic Relief Services, but "this time, it's going well." And the World Health Organization said that no major disease outbreaks have been reported in the crowded refugee camps housing survivors.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Karen Kaplan and Richard C. Paddock and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - An 8.7 magnitude earthquake struck off the northern coast of Sumatra late yesterday, killing hundreds of people, authorities said, and triggering panic and mass evacuations in coastal areas leveled by the tsunami in December. Several countries issued tsunami warnings but withdrew them after no giant waves appeared. Experts said the undersea quake triggered waves 4 to 12 inches high in different parts of the Indian Ocean. The island of Nias off the west coast of Sumatra was reported to have suffered the greatest damage from the temblor, with numerous buildings destroyed.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2005
LHOKNGA, Indonesia - For five days, the three friends walked across a 95-mile wasteland of death and destruction. Living on coconuts, cassavas and noodle packets that they found along the way, they hiked along the west coast of Sumatra through 150 villages that had been reduced to rubble by Sunday's earthquake and tsunami. They swam across 15 rivers where bridges had been washed away. They passed more bodies than they could count, including some that had lain in the tropical sun for so long that they had burst.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2005
For hours on end, Nasrullah Dahlawy sits on the lumpy couch in his sparsely furnished Southwest Baltimore rowhouse, smoking and watching CNN. Like millions of others in the United States, he finds himself riveted by the stream of unthinkable news from South Asia. But for Dahlawy, the scenes of destruction and misery are not someone else's problem. He is from Aceh, the Indonesian province that suffered more casualties than anywhere else. As many as 80,000 people in the region may have been killed by a combination of earthquakes and tsunamis.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Karen Kaplan and Richard C. Paddock and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - An 8.7 magnitude earthquake struck off the northern coast of Sumatra late yesterday, killing hundreds of people, authorities said, and triggering panic and mass evacuations in coastal areas leveled by the tsunami in December. Several countries issued tsunami warnings but withdrew them after no giant waves appeared. Experts said the undersea quake triggered waves 4 to 12 inches high in different parts of the Indian Ocean. The island of Nias off the west coast of Sumatra was reported to have suffered the greatest damage from the temblor, with numerous buildings destroyed.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 13, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - The Indonesian government tightened controls on international groups and told foreign military forces to leave by the end of March, raising concerns that aid might not reach isolated regions that need it most. Vice President Jusuf Kalla told the Indonesian news agency Antara that three months would be enough time for foreign military forces to finish their mission and leave - "in fact, the sooner the better." He said Aceh Province would soon need foreign engineers and doctors rather than soldiers.
NEWS
By Dinda Jouhana and Richard C. Paddock and Dinda Jouhana and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 16, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - The Indonesian government and Acehnese rebel leaders signed a landmark agreement yesterday in Helsinki, Finland, that ends one of Asia's longest-running wars and brings peace to a region devastated by conflict and the Dec. 26 tsunamis. After fighting for nearly 29 years, the rebel Free Aceh Movement agreed to drop its demand for independence for Aceh province in exchange for the chance to participate in elections. The government agreed to withdraw about half of its 30,000 troops from the province, release more than 1,400 political prisoners and grant amnesty to rebels.
NEWS
By Richard Paddock and Mark Magnier and Richard Paddock and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 2004
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - Exhausted survivors of South Asia's giant earthquake and tsunamis combed the rubble for food and belongings yesterday as officials stepped up efforts to identify and bury the dead, whose numbers now exceed 60,000. Small shipments of medicine, food, clothing and bedding, some sent by governments and others organized by individuals, reached a few affected areas in Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India and Thailand, the countries most seriously affected. Indonesia, with more than 32,000 dead, was the hardest-hit, followed by Sri Lanka with nearly 22,000.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 13, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - The Indonesian government tightened controls on international groups and told foreign military forces to leave by the end of March, raising concerns that aid might not reach isolated regions that need it most. Vice President Jusuf Kalla told the Indonesian news agency Antara that three months would be enough time for foreign military forces to finish their mission and leave - "in fact, the sooner the better." He said Aceh Province would soon need foreign engineers and doctors rather than soldiers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 9, 2005
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Two weeks after the tsunamis hit, the official death toll continues to rise, topping 150,000 yesterday as bodies were uncovered during the huge cleanup on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. At the same time, however, the international aid effort seems to have found its legs. Major relief efforts often become "chaotic," said Pat Johns, the emergency response coordinator for Catholic Relief Services, but "this time, it's going well." And the World Health Organization said that no major disease outbreaks have been reported in the crowded refugee camps housing survivors.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 3, 2005
LHOKNGA, Indonesia - Two women wandered across a nearly barren landscape, one clutching a frying pan. They were looking for some sign of their sister, who was imprisoned here for supporting Aceh province's outlawed separatist movement. The women wanted to find their sister alive, or retrieve her body, but it was the frying pan they located amid the rubble. This was a thriving town of 3,000 to 5,000 people, with a military encampment, the jail and many homes. Now it is gone, swept away by the Dec. 26 tsunamis.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2005
LHOKNGA, Indonesia - For five days, the three friends walked across a 95-mile wasteland of death and destruction. Living on coconuts, cassavas and noodle packets that they found along the way, they hiked along the west coast of Sumatra through 150 villages that had been reduced to rubble by Sunday's earthquake and tsunami. They swam across 15 rivers where bridges had been washed away. They passed more bodies than they could count, including some that had lain in the tropical sun for so long that they had burst.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2005
For hours on end, Nasrullah Dahlawy sits on the lumpy couch in his sparsely furnished Southwest Baltimore rowhouse, smoking and watching CNN. Like millions of others in the United States, he finds himself riveted by the stream of unthinkable news from South Asia. But for Dahlawy, the scenes of destruction and misery are not someone else's problem. He is from Aceh, the Indonesian province that suffered more casualties than anywhere else. As many as 80,000 people in the region may have been killed by a combination of earthquakes and tsunamis.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 31, 2004
MEULABOH, Indonesia - Four days after the killer tsunami swept away a large portion of this city of 30,000 people, aid is only beginning to arrive. The death toll is unknown, but according to military estimates there are 4,000 bodies and 7,000 missing. The quake and tsunami were known to have killed many in the provincial capital, Banda Aceh, and relief efforts had begun in greater earnest there. But Meulaboh, the city closest to the quake's epicenter, was the question mark. For days after the disaster, no one could reach the city, even by helicopter.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 3, 2005
LHOKNGA, Indonesia - Two women wandered across a nearly barren landscape, one clutching a frying pan. They were looking for some sign of their sister, who was imprisoned here for supporting Aceh province's outlawed separatist movement. The women wanted to find their sister alive, or retrieve her body, but it was the frying pan they located amid the rubble. This was a thriving town of 3,000 to 5,000 people, with a military encampment, the jail and many homes. Now it is gone, swept away by the Dec. 26 tsunamis.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - Toddlers stacked building blocks into towers. Five- and 6-year-olds played board games, paged through storybooks and chased one another in circles. Teenage girls in headscarves and skirts sat cross-legged side by side, whispering in each other's ears and giggling. These might be scenes from children playing almost anywhere in the world. But here, where the violent shaking of the earth and a giant wave made it seem that the world was about to come to an end, the sights and sounds of children's play and laughter this week were nothing short of remarkable, as refreshing and rare for residents as a cool breeze in this steamy city at the northern tip of Sumatra island.
NEWS
By Richard Paddock and Mark Magnier and Richard Paddock and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 2004
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - Exhausted survivors of South Asia's giant earthquake and tsunamis combed the rubble for food and belongings yesterday as officials stepped up efforts to identify and bury the dead, whose numbers now exceed 60,000. Small shipments of medicine, food, clothing and bedding, some sent by governments and others organized by individuals, reached a few affected areas in Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India and Thailand, the countries most seriously affected. Indonesia, with more than 32,000 dead, was the hardest-hit, followed by Sri Lanka with nearly 22,000.
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