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By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 1997
GEORGE SMITH'S long-term goal as new band director at South Carroll High School is to lift the band program to a higher level.Smith is confident that by tapping the full potential of each band student, making major changes in the design and difficulty of the music performed, increasing the complexity of the choreography and even changing the way the students march, the band program will move ahead of where it's been.Smith, a graduate of the University of Maryland and the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, joined the South Carroll staff in June from Northern High School in Calvert County where he was band director for more than seven years.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
Drums and xylophones were lined up along with buses in the parking lots of Towson University's Johnny Unitas Stadium on Saturday as high school marching bands from around the region gathered to show off what they had been practicing for months. Students from nine states competed in Music for All's Bands of America Regional Championship. The Lassiter High School marching band from Marietta, Ga., won the competition and will participate in a national championship at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, where the NFL Colts play.
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NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and John-John Williams IV and Tyeesha Dixon and John-John Williams IV and,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com and john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 24, 2008
The longtime band director at a Howard County high school has been accused of sexually abusing a female student over the past two years, police said yesterday. Robert Douglas Johnston, 61, who has taught at Mount Hebron High School for more than 30 years, was charged yesterday with sexual abuse of a minor, third- and fourth-degree sex offenses, and obscene telephone misuse, according to Howard County police. Johnston surrendered to police Monday night and was arrested; he was being held yesterday on a $350,000 bond, police said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Allyson Luo took up clarinet because the instrument was shiny and "looked nice. " David Flyr began playing the French horn because his mother said it might be a path to scholarships. At some point, both River Hill High School seniors discovered they were on to something; through those instruments, their talents shined. Now both have been recognized among some of the best school musicians in the state and nation. Luo and Flyr were among 670 students nationwide to be named to the National Association for Music Education's All-National Honor Ensemble, which will perform at the organization's conference in Nashville, Tenn., on Oct. 30. Luo and Flyr were among four Howard County band members selected for the ensemble.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | January 13, 2008
M. Joseph Fischer, the director of bands at River Hill High School, has been recognized by School Band and Orchestra, a national publication, for its 10th annual, "50 Directors Who Make a Difference." Fischer, who has been at the school since 2003, was a natural choice for the distinction, Principal William Ryan said. "He's an incredible teacher who goes above and beyond what he's supposed to do," Ryan said. "I put him at the top of the 50 band instructors who make a difference."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
Taped to Barry Enzman's Glenelg High School blackboard is a 1-foot model rocket next to a laminated quotation attributed to a "famous band director."When members of his marching unit stray during practice, he has been known to chide them: "I didn't ask you to build a rocket. I asked you to move from here to here in 16 counts. This isn't NASA stuff."But keeping in mind that "there is no such thing as perfection," Mr. Enzman expects achievements no less cosmic of his young musicians, and they eagerly deliver.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1996
For 22 years, Morris Long and the Severna Park Middle School concert band packed the house for Christmas and spring concerts.But a stroke last February and a diagnosis of bone cancer a week later forced the 50-year-old band director to retire.Now, current and former students, parents, and colleagues are saying "thank you" with hundreds of cards and bouquets to a man who has only days to live, according to his doctors."He was one of my favorite teachers," said Larry Serio, 29, a percussionist for Mr. Long 15 years ago. "He took the time to make sure you understood what he was teaching."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1996
A torrential downpour Tuesday night could not keep the friends and admirers of the late Morris Long from a concert honoring his legacy.About 400 Severna Park Middle School students and their teachers dedicated a conductor's stand and chair to the memory of Long, the school's former band director who died of bone cancer in January. And members of one of the six groups on the program performed one of Long's favorite works. "He would've been pleased, and I know in my heart he was," said his wife, Beatrice Long, who was seated in the front row as the guest of honor.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1996
The spotlight hits a dark-haired woman holding a microphone. Her makeup is dramatic, her hair a tussle of big curls with large earrings swaying beneath them. She wears tight black pants and a black blouse with sheer neck and sleeves."They'd probably fire me if I came to school dressed like this," said Rosemarie Schwer, a Bates Middle School teacher.But it's Saturday night in the back of Mike's Crab House in Riva, and Mrs. Schwer is transformed from an enrichment teacher at the Annapolis school to the singer in Midnight Hour, a nine-piece rock band that plays an eclectic mix of R&B, Motown and pop music from the '60s on.Mrs.
NEWS
December 18, 1997
The Meade Senior High School concert and jazz bands, orchestra and chorus will present a free Christmas concert at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Glen Burnie United Methodist Church.The church is at Second Avenue and Crain Highway.Jeff Thompson, the band director, and Joyce Nellen, the chorus director, will conduct.Information: 410-761-4381.Pub Date: 12/18/97
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Esther Everitt Dombrowski, a retired Bel Air High School librarian who also wrote feature stories for The Aegis newspaper, died of pneumonia Oct. 8 at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. She was 81 and lived in Bel Air. Born Esther Everitt on a farm near Bel Air, she was the daughter of a construction foreman and a homemaker. She was a 1948 graduate of Bel Air High School, where she returned after earning a bachelor's degree at what was then Millersville State College in Pennsylvania and a master's degree in library science at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Baltimore resident Amy Klosterman was a piano teacher at the Baltimore School for the Arts for 15 years, but her involvement with a youth band in Uganda started with a journey unrelated to music. In the summer of 2007, she traveled to Uganda to do volunteer work. One day, while participating in a community event, rain forced her and others to cram into a tent. "I got to talking to these strangers," said Klosterman, 45. "I told them I was a musician, and they told me about the brass band.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | December 4, 2011
As a member of Encore Community Music Association since its beginnings in 1995, Andrew Spang has played various instruments - and has even conducted the community band. This year, he's playing the French horn for the first time, and has the pleasure of sitting next to his son. "This is our first year doing it (together)," said Spang, of his 11-year-old, French horn playing son, Benjamin. "My daughter is in the string orchestra. This is her first year, too. It's really neat.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | August 14, 2009
A longtime band director at Mount Hebron High School in Howard County was sentenced to 18 months in jail Thursday for sexually abusing a female student at the school over a two-year period, prosecutors said. Judge Timothy McCrone sentenced Robert Douglas Johnston, who taught at the school for 35 years before his arrest in December, to nine years in prison with all but 18 months suspended. Johnston will be able to serve his time in the county detention center and will be on supervised probation for five years after his release.
NEWS
April 24, 2009
Band director pleads guilty in sex abuse case A Howard County high school band director accused of sexually abusing a female student over two years pleaded guilty Thursday, prosecutors said. Robert Douglas Johnston, 61, who taught at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City for 35 years, could have been sentenced to a maximum of 25 years in prison in a case that included sexual abuse of a minor. Under his plea agreement, he could face a maximum of 18 months at his sentencing Aug. 13, said Wayne Kirwan, a county state's attorney's spokesman.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 25, 2008
A prominent Howard County high school band director accused of sexually abusing a female student was investigated by school officials almost two years ago after a parent reported seeing the girl sitting on his lap in his office, according to court documents released yesterday. Police said Robert Douglas Johnston, 61, who has taught at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City for 35 years, sexually abused the student over a two-year period that began when she was 15.
NEWS
February 25, 2003
Owen Brown Middle School celebrated Black History Month on Feb. 11 with a recitation of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, accompanied by the school's Puma Band, gospel singer Natalie Creditt and sixth-grade teacher Steve Schaefer. "It just supported the words so dramatically," said band director Belinda King, who organized the production. "It was phenomenal. I'm still getting people stopping me in the hallways." The 45-minute morning assembly began with a PowerPoint presentation about the civil rights movement, King said.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2002
While many young musicians packed away their instruments along with their textbooks at the end of the school year, hundreds of Howard County's youth have found that summer is a perfect time to strike up the band. Summer band camp programs are increasing in popularity and offer numerous benefits to participants. Music teachers say the summer programs help students refine the skills they learn in school music programs, enhance techniques such as breath control and intonation and, most important, keep the kids practicing their instruments over the summer months.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and John-John Williams IV and Tyeesha Dixon and John-John Williams IV and,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com and john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 24, 2008
The longtime band director at a Howard County high school has been accused of sexually abusing a female student over the past two years, police said yesterday. Robert Douglas Johnston, 61, who has taught at Mount Hebron High School for more than 30 years, was charged yesterday with sexual abuse of a minor, third- and fourth-degree sex offenses, and obscene telephone misuse, according to Howard County police. Johnston surrendered to police Monday night and was arrested; he was being held yesterday on a $350,000 bond, police said.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | January 13, 2008
M. Joseph Fischer, the director of bands at River Hill High School, has been recognized by School Band and Orchestra, a national publication, for its 10th annual, "50 Directors Who Make a Difference." Fischer, who has been at the school since 2003, was a natural choice for the distinction, Principal William Ryan said. "He's an incredible teacher who goes above and beyond what he's supposed to do," Ryan said. "I put him at the top of the 50 band instructors who make a difference."
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