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Banana Bread

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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | March 3, 1999
Ann Rhodes of Cambridge sent an urgent plea for a banana bread recipe. She had lost the one she had while traveling.She wrote that her family enjoyed the bread so much and won't forgive her for losing the recipe.Madeline Collins of Bel Air sent in the recipe chosen by our tester, Laura Reiley. It was taken from the "Fallston Presbyterian Church Cookbook" (1986). It was submitted to the cookbook by Susie and Carol Himmer. Collins says the recipe is easy and makes a very moist bread. "I always make it when I have an abundance of overripe bananas," she wrote.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | July 2, 2008
Dorothy Boulware of Baltimore used to have a recipe for a banana bread that was made with whole-wheat flour and honey, along with other healthful ingredients. Unfortunately, she no longer has it and was hoping to find a similar one. I searched the Internet and found several possibilities worth testing. The recipe I found on Recipezaar really got my attention with its title, "I Can't Believe It's Reduced-Fat Whole-Wheat Banana Bread." This moist and delicious banana bread tastes wonderfully healthful, and the addition of applesauce and generous spices gives this traditional favorite a hearty taste.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 7, 2002
One of my earliest childhood memories is of my grandmother's delicious banana nut bread. I eagerly awaited her visits and loved meeting her at the Memphis train station. She always stepped off the City of New Orleans holding a huge cardboard box laden with homemade baked goods, including dark golden loaves of banana bread studded with pecans. Our family enjoyed the bread for breakfast or as a mid-afternoon snack or to end our evening meals. We savored the loaves long after MaMa had returned home.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 2005
Shari Tanner from St. Augustine, Fla., was looking for a simple, straightforward Banana Nut Bread recipe. Many readers sent in their tried-and-true recipes. Beth Edelstein of Timonium thinks hers is "the world's best." She says that it has been exported to Costa Rica, where her daughter bakes it to supplement her teacher's salary. It is a good basic recipe that makes a moist, not too sweet, banana bread. It toasts and freezes well. Recipe requests Marie Allinson of Kingsville has lost her recipe for Cream of Crab Soup.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | July 2, 2008
Dorothy Boulware of Baltimore used to have a recipe for a banana bread that was made with whole-wheat flour and honey, along with other healthful ingredients. Unfortunately, she no longer has it and was hoping to find a similar one. I searched the Internet and found several possibilities worth testing. The recipe I found on Recipezaar really got my attention with its title, "I Can't Believe It's Reduced-Fat Whole-Wheat Banana Bread." This moist and delicious banana bread tastes wonderfully healthful, and the addition of applesauce and generous spices gives this traditional favorite a hearty taste.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
Seacrets, a Jamaican-style bar and restaurant on the bay, is a colorful, lively escape from the hustle and bustle of Ocean City.That's not to imply you won't find crowds here. You will. But the bay views, reggae, hanging plants, palm trees and open air will make you feel as if you were on a Caribbean island.The atmosphere, the menu and the service are casual, enticing guests to sit back and relax. We did.While mulling over the menu, we nibbled on fresh vegetables, cheese and dip -- a "munchie plate" ($5.25)
TRAVEL
By Toni Stroud and Toni Stroud,Chicago Tribune | January 2, 2005
Even with the car windows rolled up, the perfume of Maui is unmistakable. There are the top notes: the crisp, rise-and-shine scent of eucalyptus floating from the uplands, and the sweet nip of just-mown hay. There are the bottom notes: the musky smells of rain-spattered soil, seaweed and the salt spray of the Pacific. In the background, there's the faint, velvety mix of almost-gardenia, almost-jasmine that promises plumeria blossoms are close by. And on this drive, coming from the small, plastic-wrapped aluminum loaf pan on the rental car's floorboard, the intoxicating aroma of Auntie Julia's banana bread.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 25, 1991
I enjoy telling my kids what a good boy I used to be.One my favorite tales is how on bitter mornings I would struggle through fierce Midwestern weather to get to the corner of 27th and Mitchell Avenue. That was where I was a patrol boy. It was my responsibility to make sure my fellow students made it safely across Mitchell Avenue as they walked to St. Francis Xavier grade school in St. Joseph, Mo.The snow would blow, the rain would fall, tornadoes would threaten, but duty kept me at my post.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 2005
Shari Tanner from St. Augustine, Fla., was looking for a simple, straightforward Banana Nut Bread recipe. Many readers sent in their tried-and-true recipes. Beth Edelstein of Timonium thinks hers is "the world's best." She says that it has been exported to Costa Rica, where her daughter bakes it to supplement her teacher's salary. It is a good basic recipe that makes a moist, not too sweet, banana bread. It toasts and freezes well. Recipe requests Marie Allinson of Kingsville has lost her recipe for Cream of Crab Soup.
FEATURES
October 16, 1991
In general, color is the barometer of ripeness when purchasing bananas. Bananas with green tips will be firm. If the peel is golden yellow the interior will be a bit sweeter.* Once bananas have reached the desired degree of ripeness they should be refrigerated. Chilling will darken the peel, but will not affect the fruit.* Should bananas become overly ripe, mash them with a small amount of lemon juice, place the pulp in a moisture-vapor proof container and freeze. Add to the container until there is enough to make a loaf of banana bread or muffins.
TRAVEL
By Toni Stroud and Toni Stroud,Chicago Tribune | January 2, 2005
Even with the car windows rolled up, the perfume of Maui is unmistakable. There are the top notes: the crisp, rise-and-shine scent of eucalyptus floating from the uplands, and the sweet nip of just-mown hay. There are the bottom notes: the musky smells of rain-spattered soil, seaweed and the salt spray of the Pacific. In the background, there's the faint, velvety mix of almost-gardenia, almost-jasmine that promises plumeria blossoms are close by. And on this drive, coming from the small, plastic-wrapped aluminum loaf pan on the rental car's floorboard, the intoxicating aroma of Auntie Julia's banana bread.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 7, 2002
One of my earliest childhood memories is of my grandmother's delicious banana nut bread. I eagerly awaited her visits and loved meeting her at the Memphis train station. She always stepped off the City of New Orleans holding a huge cardboard box laden with homemade baked goods, including dark golden loaves of banana bread studded with pecans. Our family enjoyed the bread for breakfast or as a mid-afternoon snack or to end our evening meals. We savored the loaves long after MaMa had returned home.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | March 3, 1999
Ann Rhodes of Cambridge sent an urgent plea for a banana bread recipe. She had lost the one she had while traveling.She wrote that her family enjoyed the bread so much and won't forgive her for losing the recipe.Madeline Collins of Bel Air sent in the recipe chosen by our tester, Laura Reiley. It was taken from the "Fallston Presbyterian Church Cookbook" (1986). It was submitted to the cookbook by Susie and Carol Himmer. Collins says the recipe is easy and makes a very moist bread. "I always make it when I have an abundance of overripe bananas," she wrote.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
Seacrets, a Jamaican-style bar and restaurant on the bay, is a colorful, lively escape from the hustle and bustle of Ocean City.That's not to imply you won't find crowds here. You will. But the bay views, reggae, hanging plants, palm trees and open air will make you feel as if you were on a Caribbean island.The atmosphere, the menu and the service are casual, enticing guests to sit back and relax. We did.While mulling over the menu, we nibbled on fresh vegetables, cheese and dip -- a "munchie plate" ($5.25)
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 25, 1991
I enjoy telling my kids what a good boy I used to be.One my favorite tales is how on bitter mornings I would struggle through fierce Midwestern weather to get to the corner of 27th and Mitchell Avenue. That was where I was a patrol boy. It was my responsibility to make sure my fellow students made it safely across Mitchell Avenue as they walked to St. Francis Xavier grade school in St. Joseph, Mo.The snow would blow, the rain would fall, tornadoes would threaten, but duty kept me at my post.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 13, 1991
What do the readers want? This is a question all of us in newspaper journalism regularly ask ourselves.Do readers want to be entertained? Do they want to be informed? Do they want big color pictures? Do they clamor for itty-bitty bites of data? My answer is: It depends.Mainly it depends what you didn't give them. Whatever you have left out in your tome on toothpicks -- data on the number of toothpicks in a box, funny true-to-life toothpick stories or a provocative analysis of the meaning of toothpicks in American society -- that is what readers want.
FEATURES
By Kathryn Higham | November 19, 1995
It's that time again. The air turns crisp and suddenly every friend you have wants to get together to celebrate the holidays."It's such a beautiful time of year that you just want to share it with everyone," says Meadow Lark Washington, a Lutherville psychotherapist who entertains a dozen times during the holiday season.While Ms. Washington prefers intimate gatherings over big parties, an open house is the most popular way to entertain this time of year. But is it possible to prepare the food for such a large party and still manage to spend time with your guests?
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