Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBan On Gays
IN THE NEWS

Ban On Gays

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Vowing to make good on one of his more dramatic campaign promises, President-elect Bill Clinton said yesterday that he intended to lift the 50-year ban on gays in the military.Mr. Clinton spoke about the controversial issue after attending a Veterans Day ceremony at the state Capitol here during which he said he was committed to keeping the United States "the strongest in the world" even as he pared down military forces.In his first major public appearance since his Election Day victory, Mr. Clinton pledged to reform the health care system for veterans, especially those who are homeless, and to retrain those who would lose jobs because of military cutbacks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2014
The air of seeming inevitability that had developed around the idea of a successful constitutional challenge to state bans on gay marriage was punctured Wednesday by a federal judge in Louisiana. After 21 consecutive decisions favoring marriage equality in federal district and appellate courts since the Supreme Court struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act, federal District Judge Martin L. C. Feldman upheld the ban on same-sex marriage that Louisiana voters overwhelmingly supported in 2004.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | December 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court refused yesterday to put its prestige behind the military's ban on gays, forcing the armed services to try to justify that rule in court while President-elect Bill Clinton plans a way to end it.In a surprising move, the court turned aside a Bush administration plea to uphold the constitutionality of the long-standing rule that no known homosexual may remain in uniform. The court order will mean, in practice, that Mr. Clinton will be able to deal with the ban in his own way and in his own time.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
The Boy Scouts of America's ban on gay leaders is losing the organization more money -- this time from Maryland. This week, Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin, one of the largest private employers in the state, announced it will no longer provide philanthropic support to the Boy Scouts because of the nonprofit organization's "policies that discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation and religious affiliation. " Lockheed Martin announced its decision in a statement to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Wednesday.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- They trudged from office to office, marching up and down the bleak institutional corridors of the buildings that house the U.S. Senate.They had come to lobby the senators, but no senator would see them. They did not represent any giant oil companies or insurance firms. They were young and old, white and black, straight and gay. They had all served their country in uniform. And now they were here because they believe that ending the ban on gays in the military is a simple matter of civil rights.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | March 17, 1993
Jim Holobaugh has gone from poster boy to . . . poster boy.In 1987, the ROTC cadet was the stuff of a recruiter's dreams. With his straight A's in all his military science classes and a milk-fed, Midwestern sort of handsomeness, he was selected to appear in a national ROTC recruiting ad. Today, as intelligent and presentable as ever, he still seems the perfect spokesman -- this time, though, as an openly gay man fighting the ban on homosexuals in the military.Mr....
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and John Fairhall and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau Richard H.P. Sia of the Washington Bureau and contributing writer Nelson Schwartz contributed to this article | January 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Senate leaders carried a proposed compromise to the White House last night in an effort to head off a showdown with President Clinton over ending the ban on gays in the military but failed to make a final breakthrough.Both sides reported "progress," but Mr. Clinton will talk again this morning with Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga., chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee and key figure in the effort to avoid a congressional showdown, before he makes a public announcement.Mr. Nunn, appearing angry, left last night's meeting saying curtly: "We made some progress towards reaching a conclusion on this matter."
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers called yesterday for an end to the Pentagon's ban on gays in the military, citing findings in a government report that the prohibition hurts recruiting and retention even as the war in Iraq strains the military's ability to maintain its troop strength. A Government Accountability Office study, released Wednesday, found that since 1993, the Department of Defense had spent at least $191 million to recruit and train replacements for almost 10,000 service members discharged under the ban - including more than 300 with critical language skills.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | July 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- After grappling with Japan's trade practices and North Korea's nuclear threats during a trip to Asia, President Clinton returns to the White House tonight to confront an issue that has been lying in wait for him for six months: the military's ban on homosexuals.As pressure mounts for Mr. Clinton to decide a new policy on gays in the military as soon as tomorrow, his gay friends and supporters are anticipating the worst.Two gay rights advocates were told by the Pentagon yesterday that Defense Secretary Les Aspin will recommend allowing homosexuals to serve as long as they do not make public or private declarations about their sexual orientation, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and John Fairhall and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau Contributing writer Nelson Schwartz and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | January 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to avoid a politically costly showdown with Congress, President Clinton will take a more modest initial step than expected toward lifting the ban on gays in the military.The president will issue a directive to Defense Secretary Les Aspin today or tomorrow that would temporarily end the military practice of asking applicants their sexual preference, administration officials said. But he is no longer expected to immediately suspend legal action against gays already in the military.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Pardon me if I'm encouraged -- but not enthused -- by the decision of the Boy Scouts of America to lift its century-old ban on gay scouts. I just can't get that excited about the fact that an organization that holds a deep-seated distrust in gay men is now letting gay kids join the club. The dynamic creates a puzzle in my head, and I'm still trying to find the corner pieces and determine some structure here. Given the green light by some of the organization's largest donors, including the Mormon and United Methodist churches, and facing the withdrawal of funding from many other donors, more than 60 percent of the BSA's 1,400-delegate-strong National Council voted to lift the ban yesterday.
FEATURES
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Carrie Wells, Tribune Newspapers | May 23, 2013
In an emotionally charged vote Thursday, the Boy Scouts of America lifted its ban on gay youth starting in January, the latest sign of a shift in American attitudes toward gays and lesbians. After months of debate in local districts, more than 61 percent of the Boy Scouts national council approved a resolution at its annual meeting, overturning the long-standing prohibition on openly gay youth, while retaining a ban on gay adult leaders. Of 1,232 votes, 757 were in favor. Gay advocates called the vote a step in the right direction for the 103-year-old group, among the nation's largest youth organizations, with more than 2.6 million youth members.
FEATURES
By Michael Lofthus, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
A national scouting alumni organization will be campaigning at the Boy Scouts of America's Baltimore Council Headquarters Friday to promote internal legislation concerning the acceptance of openly gay members. At 12:30 p.m., Scouts for Equality will begin a Council Day of Action in an effort to encourage the Council's national representatives to vote in favor of pending BSA resolutions that will reevaluate bans on gay youth and other issues. The advocacy group is aiming to convey the support it has from local scouts and parents for expanding inclusiveness and equality in scouting.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
President Barack Obama could have stayed out of the case against California's ban on gay marriage, known as Proposition 8. The federal government isn't a party to the case, and Mr. Obama could have hidden behind the precedent of previous administrations that declined to get involved in similar suits, like those that struck down bans on interracial marriage or laws criminalizing homosexual conduct. But instead, Mr. Obama's self-described "evolution" on the issue continued this week with a brief arguing that no compelling public interest is served by treating same-sex couples differently from opposite-sex ones.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
The leaders of the Boy Scouts of America are expected to vote tomorrow on whether to scrap the organization's long-standing national ban on admitting gay Scouts and Scout leaders, and to replace it with a policy that allows the religious and civic organizations that sponsor individual Scout units to set their own rules on the issue. The ban on gay Scouts is an anachronism that flies in the face of the overdue societal trend toward greater inclusiveness, tolerance and acceptance of diversity.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
Twenty years ago, Aaron Becker had just been named valedictorian of Baltimore's City College when he was also awarded the rank of Eagle Scout — the culmination of years of Scouting work, including a seven-month project to make a video about emotionally vulnerable children. But Becker's longtime affiliation with the Boy Scouts of America came to an end recently, when he returned his Eagle medal to the organization because of its decision to uphold a ban on openly gay Scouts and leaders.
NEWS
By Eric Schmitt and Eric Schmitt,New York Times News Service | January 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton plans to direct Defense Secretary Les Aspin to prepare an executive order that would lift the ban on homosexuals in the military sometime in the next few months, Clinton aides said yesterday.In the meantime, the military will be directed less formally to stop asking recruits about their sexual orientation and discharging people from the armed services when they are found to be homosexuals. These are the two points that would be the main practical effects once an executive order is in place.
NEWS
By Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett visited several Carroll sites Friday as part of his efforts to keep in touch with constituents.Mr. Bartlett, a Frederick Republican who represents the 6th District, talked with volunteers at Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland as they prepared food at the New Windsor Service Center.He also met with representatives of the Literacy Council of Carroll County, the Association for Retarded Citizens of Carroll County and Marada Industries."He likes to spend as much time in the district as he can," said his aide Nancy Stocksdale.
NEWS
July 12, 2009
Rep. Patrick Murphy of Pennsylvania, an Iraq war veteran, is making a push this summer for a congressional repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military. Even back in 1993, when President Bill Clinton first proposed this artless dodge, a majority of Americans favored letting gays serve openly. Sixteen years later, the numbers are overwhelming; a CNN/Opinion Research poll in December found 81 percent of Americans now share that belief. But not in Congress. Mr. Murphy has about 160 co-sponsors, almost all of them Democrats.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,Tribune Washington Bureau | April 17, 2009
Carlisle Barracks, Pa. - Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Thursday that the Obama administration would move cautiously in shifting policies on gays serving openly in the military, but he signaled that military service members should prepare for possible changes. In his most extensive remarks to date about the ban on gays who serve openly, Gates said he and other military leaders have "begun a dialogue" with President Barack Obama about the issue. Obama promised during last year's presidential campaign to end the ban on gays, and the White House has said recently that it is reviewing the issue.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.