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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1998
During the past four months, former Ravens running back Bam Morris has gotten up each day to work out as many as three times a day. And then he waits for a phone call from one of 30 National Football League teams inviting him to training camp.Thus far, the Kansas City Chiefs, Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots have shown lukewarm interest, but there are no imminent deals. Instead, Morris keeps training, running and lifting weights. And waiting, and waiting and waiting"In my heart, in my mind, there has never been a question about me still being able to play in this league," said Morris, 26, appearing with his new agent, Terry Lavenstein, a prominent Baltimore attorney, in Lavenstein's downtown office.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore | February 21, 2011
Digital entertainment has shaken the retail industry, shuttering your local brick-and-mortar record store, bookseller and video rental outlets. Could the neighborhood comic book shop be next? Diamond Comic Distributors Inc. hopes not. The Timonium company is the country's largest distributor of comics to about 2,700 small retailers. It has been fighting the same forces — online sales, changing consumer habits and even digital piracy — that are pushing other retailers to the brink.
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NEWS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Bam Morris is back in his element, ribbing teammates in the locker room, clowning around between plays on the practice field, relishing the thought of running over the next tackler who steps in his path.The Ravens' newest and biggest backfield addition tells his story with childlike animation, flashing a charming smile, talking with a rhythm not unlike that of a preacher.Morris already has tasted sweet fruit in his chosen trade. A high school legend in his tiny hometown of Cooper, Texas, he went to Texas Tech and broke fellow Texas legend Earl Campbell's single-season, Southwest Conference rushing record.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | August 24, 2009
Michael Kenny hoisted his 4-year-old son Bam-Bam onto his shoulders and waited with anticipation for two of the world's most recognizable athletes - Shaquille O'Neal and Michael Phelps to enter Loyola University's aquatics center. "Put your hands up! Put your hands up!" Kenny urged his young son. "Why?" Bam-Bam asked softly. "You might be on TV," Kenny said with a laugh. A few minutes earlier Kenny and his son were in danger of missing the two athletes go head-to-head in a series of swimming events for O'Neal's new ABC show "Shaq Vs.," which pits the basketball star against athletes in their own sports and airs Sept.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 19, 2004
TYNDA, Russia - They came from across the Soviet Union three decades ago to the frozen swamps and forests of Russia's Far East to promote socialism, defend the motherland - and build one of the largest railroad projects in history. Tens of thousands of volunteers cleared trees and slept in tents in a region where winter temperatures can reach minus 60 degrees Fahrenheit. They graded roads, built villages and cities, laid track, dedicating their lives to creating the 2,200-mile Baikal-Amur Railway - or BAM - one of the greatest achievements of the Soviet era. Today, railroad engines on BAM haul hoppers filled with coal and flatbed cars stacked with lumber through dense forests, over mountains nearly a mile high and across tracts of permafrost that are as big as many nations.
NEWS
April 22, 2000
Rain and high winds swept through the Baltimore region yesterday evening, leveling an auditorium under construction and two barns in Calvert County. The fast-moving storm knocked out electricity to about 7,300 customers in Central Maryland and delayed some flights at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. Heavy rain drenched Baltimore, particularly around Camden Yards, but caused no damage, officials said. But about 5 p.m. in Southern Maryland, winds knocked down an auditorium being built for the Cardinal Hickey Academy on Mount Harmony Road in northern Calvert County, causing about $500,000 in damage, said Michael Montgomery, chief of the Dunkirk Volunteer Fire Department.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
Baltimore cellular customers will become the first in the nation to try out a new technology that will let portable phones announce verbally who is calling and give the customer the option of accepting or rerouting the call.GTE Telecommunication Services technology and Bell Atlantic Mobile (BAM) said yesterday that they will begin their test of GTE's Spoken Caller Identification service in February. Baltimore was chosen as the first site because Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland's advanced switching system will let cellular customers keep their own numbers, said BAM spokeswoman Karen Ann Kurlander.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 1, 2003
BROOKLYN, N. Y. - There's a new Viennese restaurant on Lafayette Avenue here, and you'd better make reservations early if you want to get in on a theater night. Called Thomas Beisl - Austrian for Thomas Bistro - the cafe is one of many businesses that have opened in recent years around the Brooklyn Academy of Music or BAM. Owner Thomas Ferlesch, a longtime Brooklyn resident, quit his job after 11 years as executive chef of Manhattan's Cafe des Artistes to capitalize on what he calls new energy in the neighborhood - energy that he attributes to BAM. "It's opening night [of the fall season]
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1997
LANDOVER -- Ervin Reid tried to warn the Washington Redskins fans long before game time yesterday that Ravens running back Bam Morris was going to grind the home team into the Jack Kent Cooke Stadium turf."
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | August 24, 2009
Michael Kenny hoisted his 4-year-old son Bam-Bam onto his shoulders and waited with anticipation for two of the world's most recognizable athletes - Shaquille O'Neal and Michael Phelps to enter Loyola University's aquatics center. "Put your hands up! Put your hands up!" Kenny urged his young son. "Why?" Bam-Bam asked softly. "You might be on TV," Kenny said with a laugh. A few minutes earlier Kenny and his son were in danger of missing the two athletes go head-to-head in a series of swimming events for O'Neal's new ABC show "Shaq Vs.," which pits the basketball star against athletes in their own sports and airs Sept.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 15, 2006
IF YOU TUNED INTO POP OR URBAN RADIO during 2005, or if you went out to any hip nightspot last year, then surely you heard Kanye West's "Gold Digger" and the Ying Yang Twins' "Wait (The Whisper Song)." You probably downloaded them onto your iPod, or perhaps you actually went out and bought the CDs from which the singles were culled. But did you really listen to those songs? Both are up for Grammys next month. Superstar rapper-producer West garnered eight nods for his double-platinum sophomore album, Late Registration, which features "Gold Digger."
SPORTS
By THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | December 6, 2004
ATLANTA - Hank Aaron, who has long supported San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds, now says he is disturbed by Bonds' statements to a grand jury investigating a California lab for illegal steroids distribution. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, Bonds told the grand jury he wasn't aware that a clear substance and a cream given to him by his trainer contained steroids. Bonds also said that he thought the substances were flaxseed oil, a nutritional supplement and a rubbing balm for arthritis.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 19, 2004
TYNDA, Russia - They came from across the Soviet Union three decades ago to the frozen swamps and forests of Russia's Far East to promote socialism, defend the motherland - and build one of the largest railroad projects in history. Tens of thousands of volunteers cleared trees and slept in tents in a region where winter temperatures can reach minus 60 degrees Fahrenheit. They graded roads, built villages and cities, laid track, dedicating their lives to creating the 2,200-mile Baikal-Amur Railway - or BAM - one of the greatest achievements of the Soviet era. Today, railroad engines on BAM haul hoppers filled with coal and flatbed cars stacked with lumber through dense forests, over mountains nearly a mile high and across tracts of permafrost that are as big as many nations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 6, 2004
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran is considering moving its capital from Tehran after the earthquake last month that devastated the southern city of Bam, killing more than one-third of the population there. Tehran is on a major seismological fault, and experts have long warned that an earthquake here could be catastrophic. Tehran has a population of more than 12 million and is one of the most earthquake-prone regions in the country. The head of the country's Supreme National Security Council, Hassan Rowhani, told Iranian state television that the idea of moving the capital was being studied by the council and that a decision would be reached by the end of March, which is the end of the Iranian calendar year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 2003
KERMAN, Iran -- As rescue workers raced to the ancient city of Bam, officials there raised the death toll from Friday's 12-second earthquake to 25,000 and worried that it could go much higher. Interior Minister Abdolvahed Moussavi Lari said yesterday on state television from Bam: "The city is ruined. More than 70 percent of it is destroyed." Tens of thousands of the injured crowded field hospitals or lay in the streets. Survivors and rescuers dug frantically to uncover those still trapped.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 1, 2003
BROOKLYN, N. Y. - There's a new Viennese restaurant on Lafayette Avenue here, and you'd better make reservations early if you want to get in on a theater night. Called Thomas Beisl - Austrian for Thomas Bistro - the cafe is one of many businesses that have opened in recent years around the Brooklyn Academy of Music or BAM. Owner Thomas Ferlesch, a longtime Brooklyn resident, quit his job after 11 years as executive chef of Manhattan's Cafe des Artistes to capitalize on what he calls new energy in the neighborhood - energy that he attributes to BAM. "It's opening night [of the fall season]
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | March 1, 1992
Too many presidential primaries seriously distorts the political process. The proliferation of early primaries this year has candidates bouncing from one state to another like ping-pong balls. None of this is very presidential.Bam! A rally in Baltimore. Bam! Off to a Chicago fund-raiser. Bam! zTC Back to Annapolis for a photo-op at the State House. Bam! High-tailing it to Sioux City for a press conference. Bam! Flying back to greet commuters at a Bethesda Metro stop. Bam! Dashing to Atlanta for a televised debate.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
The Ravens gave a state-of-Bam Morris address yesterday.The latest chapter in the saga unfolded yesterday at the team's Owings Mills training facility when the star running back returned to practice and the starting lineup.First there was Morris signing a contract in September 1996. Then there was the overweight caper last April. Next there was the suspension for four games at the beginning of this season and then last week came the newest episode: Morris returns to jail.After spending Friday night in a Rockwall County, Texas, detention center on charges that he violated conditions of his 10-year probation by not attending meetings with his parole officer and consuming alcohol, Morris practiced with the team in a 75-minute workout as the Ravens (3-3)
NEWS
By Rebecca Faye Smith Galli | April 2, 2002
IT DOESN'T happen often. But when it does, you hope that what you say will be the words they need to hear. Kids today are so independent, self-reliant and amazingly adaptable to demands on their time that we rarely get a glimpse of what hurts their hearts and needles their minds. But it's the season of anxiety for our children as they seek their places in new schools, sports and jobs. We join their emotional roller-coaster rides where "what if" and "maybe" riddle their routines, and ours.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 21, 2001
LOS ANGELES - Linda Bloodworth, executive producer of the NBC sitcom Emeril, explained the thinking behind the new fall show by saying, "The plan was to put Emeril Lagasse, who has this fabulous personality, in the middle of some very loud, mouthy, designing women - along with some great food. And our premise was: What's not to like?" How about almost everything, Linda? Every year on summer press tour there is at least one pilot for a series that is such a sorry mess that the usually contentious critics unanimously agree that it ought to be taken out back behind network headquarters and put out of its misery without ever being inflicted on the American public.
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