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NEWS
June 19, 2013
Baltimore city residents will be paying a 9-percent tax on the bottle for alcoholic beverages ("Give us a break from City Hall's fee fever," June 13). That means a 30-pack of beer will cost $1.69 more than in Baltimore County after the distributor takes 5 cents a case! Thank you, mayor and City Council! Joe Gordon, Baltimore The writer is owner of Genie's Liquors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 24, 2014
Tuesday morning in a coffee shop, I heard someone wonder why Brandon Finney, the Shock Trauma surgical technician who was shot to death Sunday night, had been standing near Lexington Market at such a late hour. What was he doing there at 11:30? The question suggested that anyone who ventured after hours near the city's historic market - notable for fresh fish and produce on the inside, and too many drug addicts on the outside - must be either up to no good or asking for trouble. But the answer, it turns out, was simple: Brandon Finney had been waiting for the bus. That's what most people do in Baltimore - the working, contributing, responsible people, that is, as opposed to the losers who degrade and debase the city with their guns and cowardice, with stupidity and recklessness.
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NEWS
August 1, 2012
Your recent article about surveillance cameras in Baltimore was alarming ("City surveillance camera system to expand, July 21). In Baltimore, the number of cameras has grown from fewer than 200 in 2005 to more than 800 today, if one includes the 250 private cameras the city can access. Yet the city wants even more cameras. The Board of Estimates recently agreed to create a database that will give the Police Department access to more private security cameras to create a bigger surveillance system.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Born and raised here, a true "Son of Baltimore," I have witnessed the evolution and controversy of the "O!" sung during "The Star-Spangled Banner" since its origins in the cheap seats of Memorial Stadium some 30-plus years ago ( "Stop desecrating the anthem," Sept. 18). To those who accuse us of disrespect and desecration, I have the following to say. My family, like many, came to the docks of Locust Point poor and hopeful and never left - the immigrant working-class backbone of a young country.
NEWS
May 31, 2014
The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City. This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose. It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
My wife and I and another couple just got back from a few days in your beautiful city. We were there to watch baseball and stayed close to the Inner Harbor. While there we could not believe how friendly the people were. Television does not do justice to the beauty of Camden Yards. The Oriole fans are great people, and the concessions were excellent too. I would like to thank the folks at the Hampton Inn for taking such good care of us and also Dave at Peter's Pour House. But most of all I would like the thank the three gentlemen on the boat named "Bus N Loose" for the ride back to the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Born and raised here, a true "Son of Baltimore," I have witnessed the evolution and controversy of the "O!" sung during "The Star-Spangled Banner" since its origins in the cheap seats of Memorial Stadium some 30-plus years ago ( "Stop desecrating the anthem," Sept. 18). To those who accuse us of disrespect and desecration, I have the following to say. My family, like many, came to the docks of Locust Point poor and hopeful and never left - the immigrant working-class backbone of a young country.
NEWS
By Jake Stern | May 9, 2011
I live about three-quarters of a mile from the Inner Harbor and have for close to seven years now, but I would not say it's one of my favorite places to frequent on a Friday night — or any other night. Sure, the harbor offers great waterfront views and a number of upscale restaurants, but most Baltimoreans would likely tell you that the Inner Harbor is for the tourists. The Inner Harbor is a moneymaking machine dreamed up 30 years ago, and it's still making money. Isn't it about time Baltimoreans took back the harbor?
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Baltimore needs to give the money from its failed speed cameras back to its citizens. They are flawed: Give the money back! Chuck Shettle - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Madeleine Mysko | October 9, 2002
A FRIEND who was in town for genealogical research needed to get to Mount Carmel Cemetery. I located it on the map -- 5712 O'Donnell St., right across from the Baltimore Travel Plaza -- and on impulse offered to drive her there. We arrived late on a Saturday afternoon in a light rain. Unfortunately, my friend's research on her lost relative had yielded nothing more than an obituary mentioning interment at Mount Carmel. "So we're just looking for her name on a stone?" I asked. The caretaker's house was vacant, the front window broken.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
About 30,000 low-income Marylanders, half of them in the Baltimore region, have signed up for $10-a-month Internet service, Comcast officials said Monday as they promoted broadened access to the program, now in its fourth year. The Philadelphia-based cable service provider revealed the figures at an event at Baltimore's Digital Harbor Foundation, an after-school program it is working with to help close the digital divide. Comcast is giving the foundation free Internet service and donated more than 50 laptops to students at the event, attended by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
After poring through 20 boxes of Betsy Bonaparte's correspondence at the Maryland Historical Society, Natalie Wexler's heart sank. In 2005, Wexler had been captivated by a portrait she'd seen of the Baltimore-born beauty, who wed Jerome Bonaparte, Napoleon's youngest brother, against the French emperor's wishes. Wexler is an author, a historian and an attorney. She itched to tell Betsy's story - until she started reading the letters. "Betsy was really not a very pleasant person," says Wexler, now 59 and a Washington resident.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
A total of 60,000 heroin addicts in Baltimore: It's a number that has cropped up in news stories and public pronouncements in various forms over the years. But it's a statistic with murky origins and that some say is vastly inflated. Sen. Barbara A. Milkuski included the figure in a recent news release, using information from federal law enforcement, according to her office. A spokesman for the Baltimore office of the Drug Enforcement Administration said it's a tally agents there also recognize.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
This was the promise: No longer would African-Americans be forced to pick up their meals from the back door of restaurants. No longer would they need to fear being unable to find lodgings on their way home from a trip. And no longer would those who denied them a seat in a theater or on a merry-go-round be able to cloak their prejudice with the law. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act on July 2, 1964, the culmination of decades of struggle for racial equality.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 17, 2014
Thirty-five years ago, when the number of homeless people in Baltimore was noticeably on the rise, several reasons were given: mental illness and deinstitutionalization, the city's relatively high unemployment rate, drug addiction, family dysfunction and evictions, the lack of affordable housing and the problem of ex-offenders being released from prison without a welcoming destination. At the same time, more and more people, including children, were showing up for lunch and dinner at a growing number of soup kitchens.
NEWS
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Date: March 1 Her story: Kathleen Miller, 30, grew up in Darnestown in Montgomery County. She is a risk analyst at Legg Mason in Baltimore. Her mother, Peggy Miller, lives in Frederick, and her father, Ted Miller, lives in Bethesda. His story: Michael Pukacz, 32, grew up in Severna Park. He is a financial analyst at LaSalle Investment Management in Baltimore. His parents, Ron and Yvonne Pukacz, live in Severna Park. Their story: Kathleen and Mike met through eHarmony.com in October 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2011
Zagat has released its 2012 America's Top Restaurants Survey, covering 1,578 of the nation's top restaurants across 45 U.S. markets, including Baltimore, which is yoked together in most, but not all, of the survey questions with Washington. Restaurant owners in Baltimore-D.C. area may have their work cut out for them. Diners in our market say they eat out an average of 2.6 times a week, which ranks 43rd among the 45 markets surveyed and far below the national average of 3.1 times a week.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 4, 2003
EVERY SO OFTEN when I hear a certain phrase or sentence, I stop and think, well, that's a sure sign of being a Baltimorean. These signs are often elusive, but unmistakable. Here's a batch I've encountered over this holiday season. If you want to please a Baltimorean, or cause a near-riot, just open a box of Rheb's candy at the table. Baltimoreans do not become rhapsodic over $25-a-pound designer sweets. But they will stand in line for near decades for their favorite chocolates (you must have a preference, the milk chocolate or the bittersweet darks)
NEWS
May 31, 2014
The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City. This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose. It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations.
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