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NEWS
By T.J. Simers and T.J. Simers,Los Angeles Times Staff writer Vito Stellino contributed to this article | December 24, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Georgia Frontiere, owner of the Los Angeles Rams, says she has no interest in selling her team, but she is exploring the option of moving it, possibly to Baltimore."
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SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | March 26, 1995
Twenty-three years ago, Georgia Frontiere's sixth husband, Carroll Rosenbloom, traded the Baltimore Colts to Bob Irsay for the Los Angeles Rams, a deal that set into motion the sequence of events that led to the Colts' departure from Baltimore.Now, things may come full circle.Frontiere might start a process that could help Baltimore finally get back into the NFL.Unless there's a last-minute settlement, Frontiere is expected to file a lawsuit this week that will attempt to overturn the league's rejection of the Rams' proposed move to St. Louis.
SPORTS
March 15, 2001
Player of the Year Carmelo Anthony, Towson Catholic: Anthony may be the area's most complete player. Maryland, Syracuse and North Carolina are among dozen of high-profile Division I programs that have the versatile 6-foot-7 junior near the top of its recruiting wish list. A first-team All-Catholic League performer during the regular season and postseason tournament, Anthony averaged 23.1 points, 10.2 rebounds and 3.7 assists for the Owls, who won the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference Tournament title and was runner-up to St. Maria Goretti in the Catholic League Tourney.
NEWS
By Megan H. Ryan and Megan H. Ryan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2002
Nowadays, it is a rare treat to see the word coddies on a menu, but not so long ago this uniquely Baltimore food was as close as your corner store, malt shop or confectionery. Coddies are not to be confused with cod cakes. While recipes for coddies vary, a coddie can be best described as a hand-formed, gently seasoned mashed-potato-and-cracker mixture that is always deep-fried and traditionally served between two saltine crackers topped with yellow mustard. It contains little or no cod. Served at room temperature, today's coddies are made slightly larger than in the past, hanging over the sides of the saltines by one-half inch all around.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1996
Baltimore's NFL team will announce its name today at noon at Harborplace. To find out the winner, call Sundial after 1 p.m. today at (410) 783-1800 and enter code 6130. One thing became clear through the weeks of studies, polls and focus meetings conducted by Baltimore's new NFL team: This city's first choice for a team name is the Colts.But it also is the name of a team that moved out of town 12 years ago today, and it isn't coming back.The replacement that will be announced today -- almost certainly Ravens -- is the result of thousands of hours of sifting through ideas and testing the reaction of likely fans.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | December 5, 1993
It was appropriate that the day after Baltimore was knocked out of the NFL expansion race, the Friends of the Performing Arts announced they'll be raising funds to build a $60 million performing arts center in the Mount Royal cultural district.If they're looking for contributions, they should start in Bethesda, where they could speak to that well-known Maryland patron of the arts, Paul Tagliabue.It was Tagliabue who suggested Tuesday that cities could spend their money on museums instead of football stadiums.
NEWS
June 26, 1995
AS THE END draws closer for The Evening Sun, it is worth noting how times have changed since the heyday of evening newspapers in Baltimore and other metropolitan areas. A colleague recently came across a front page from The Sun that had been stamped onto an ashtray that illustrates the point.The date: Monday, Dec. 28, 1959.The banner headline: "Colts Rally In Final Period To Beat Giants, 31-16, And Keep Pro Grid Title" (front-page by-lines on game stories by Cameron C. Snyder and Ed Brandt)
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2000
Mayor Martin O'Malley's vow to defend Baltimore's affirmative-action program will push the city into what some mayors are calling the "new Selma" of the civil rights struggle: black economic empowerment. In his first State of the City address on Tuesday, the mayor pledged to appeal a federal judge's ruling last month ordering Baltimore to cease enforcing its minority set-aside law. The ordinance, passed two decades ago, requires 20 percent of the city's public works contracts to be awarded to minority companies and 3 percent to businesses owned by women.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 12, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has a bit part as a security guard at the State House in Annapolis. The Rev. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor of Bethel AME Church, has a bigger part as an influential minister delivering a powerful sermon on the eve of a hotly contested Baltimore mayoral primary. And Edward T. Norris, the former police commissioner and convicted felon, is back in his recurring role as a hard-working homicide detective named Ed Norris who is just trying to do good ole police work.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Looks like the French may not be flocking to Charm City anytime soon. Seems Baltimore's not really a safe destination, at least as far as the French foreign ministry is concerned. Just as our state department warns about Americans traveling to certain places (it suggests avoiding North Korea, for example), the French are urged to exercise caution in certain U.S. locales. And what do the French say about Baltimore? "Considered a dangerous city except Downtown. " But don't feel too bad; few American cities fared that much better.
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