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By Sloane Brown | June 17, 2001
Lions and tigers and bears, oh my. Welcome to "Zoomerang! 2001" -- the Baltimore Zoo's annual gala extravaganza. More than 2,300 gussied-up guests descended on the zoo to check out some of the furry and feathered residents and sample the fare from some 70 area restaurants and caterers. A camel and goat were among the welcoming committee at the front gate. Inside, the evening's guest of honor -- Fasier, the Siberian tiger -- posed regally in his cage. And a polar bear demonstrated swimming techniques in his pool.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
June 18, 1992
This weekend's grand opening of the African Watering Hole brings a welcome new dimension to the Baltimore Zoo.White rhinoceroses, zebras, ostriches, sable antelopes, Thompson's gazelles, pink-backed pelicans and a variety of exotic African birds will be roaming a six-acre savannah habitat at the zoo. "This fascinating array of wildlife will provide visitors with a real opportunity to see and understand life on the African plains," zoo director Brian Rutledge...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
Marion C. Cohen, a former Roland Park resident and patron of the arts who was a granddaughter of President Grover Cleveland, died Feb. 21 at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H., of complications from a fall. She was 87. The daughter of Francis Grover Cleveland, an actor, and Alice Pardee Erdman Cleveland, a homemaker, Marion Cleveland was born in Belmont, Mass., and raised in New York City. In addition to President Cleveland, she was the granddaughter of first lady Frances Folsom Cleveland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 5, 1999
Mission: To create a world-class zoo for the enjoyment of the community, as a tourist attraction to support the local economy and as a vehicle for education and conservation; to manage and preserve the zoo's collection and contribute to global efforts to save endangered species and wild lands; to conduct research that benefits wildlife; and to enhance knowledge and understanding of wildlife and conservation. Founded in 1876, the Baltimore Zoo is the third-oldest zoo in the country. More than 2,000 animals live on 186 acres.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | December 21, 2013
The force is strong with these ones. The Baltimore Zoo has announced Friday the winners of a contest to name its two lion cubs. With more than 20,000 votes, the cubs will now be known as Luke and Leia -- after the heroes of the first three "Star Wars" movies -- beating out suggestions from "The Simpsons" and Shakespeare. The 10-week-old cubs, who lost their mother when she died from labor complications, are reported to be in good health. The zoo's website reports: "They are both healthy and enjoy playing with one another.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
Sure, riding the zoo's new train is cool and all, admits 5-year-old Charlotte Corcoran. But the really cool thing about the Falls Road Zephyr is what goes on around the train. "It was great; I got to see all the animals," Charlotte said yesterday after she and her dad, Rick, a member of the zoo's board of directors, got an early seat on the Zephyr. "The best part was I got to see the monkeys." Train-less since 2005, when its old miniature locomotive had to be taken off the rails — it was falling apart, zoo officials said, and replacement parts were increasingly tough to find — the Maryland Zoo at Baltimore officially gets back into the miniature-railroad business at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
As a blazing sun beat down on the city Tuesday, Rock Island - the moated exhibit at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore where African penguins zip through cool, shallow waters - seemed a good place to be. But the Druid Hill Park enclosure is nothing compared to the new digs planned for the zoo's prized colony of endangered birds. In a move to further enhance what is already considered one of North America's most robust breeding grounds for African penguins, zoo officials started construction this week on a $10.4 million, 1.5-acre exhibit for the birds to call home.
NEWS
September 27, 2000
Do you know? Where do pelicans live? Answer: Pelicans live around the world -- even in Maryland! Learn more! Visit the pink-backed pelicans at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "The Adventures of Pelican Pete" by Hugh Keiser. 1. Pink-backed pelicans nest in trees and shrubs. Other pelicans nest on the ground. 2. Both parents care for pelican chicks.
NEWS
October 28, 1994
The hatching of a lesser flamingo chick -- an event that has happened only at one other wildlife park in North America -- was announced yesterday by the Baltimore Zoo.The chick emerged Saturday on a mud nest in the basement of the Hippo House, attended by its parents and the other 30 adult birds in the zoo flock.The birds -- native to the shallow lagoons and lakes of southern and eastern Africa, Madagascar and northwest India -- are accustomed to warm weather and are kept indoors, off exhibit during the cool months.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Little Luke and Leia, the first lion cubs ever born at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , made their public debut Saturday, and thousands visited the zoo to see them. "There were a lot of gasps, and 'Oh my God, how cutes,'" said Jane Ballentine, a zoo spokeswoman. "I like to call it the big-smile reaction - people just pointing and smiling and laughing. " The cubs, given their Star Wars-inspired names by zoo visitors in a voting contest at the end of last year, were joined by Zuri, another lion cub brought to the Baltimore zoo from Miami.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | December 21, 2013
The force is strong with these ones. The Baltimore Zoo has announced Friday the winners of a contest to name its two lion cubs. With more than 20,000 votes, the cubs will now be known as Luke and Leia -- after the heroes of the first three "Star Wars" movies -- beating out suggestions from "The Simpsons" and Shakespeare. The 10-week-old cubs, who lost their mother when she died from labor complications, are reported to be in good health. The zoo's website reports: "They are both healthy and enjoy playing with one another.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Ellen Irene Rhudy, a writer and activist for Patapsco Valley environmental causes who also performed in community theater productions, died of complications from leukemia Nov. 24 at Howard County General Hospital. The Marriottsville resident was 69. Born Ellen Strauss in Baltimore and raised on Greystone Road in Arbutus, she was the daughter of Charles F. Strauss, a Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory model builder, and his wife, the former Irene Stephan, a homemaker. She was a 1962 graduate of Catonsville High School.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
A new species of lemur has arrived at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , adding to a multi-species collection that has also grown in other ways recently. Alexander and Fern, the two new ring-tailed lemurs, are the first of their kind at the zoo, which also welcomed a newborn Coquerel's sifaka lemur in March named Max. Max's siblings Otto and Nero were born at the zoo in recent years. Alexander, 8, and Fern, 6, recently arrived in Baltimore from the Duke Lemur Center in Durham, North Carolina, zoo officials said.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Elizabeth E.W. Kirk has planned to be buried alongside her mother, Beatrice, and her family dogs at the Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, believed to be one of the world's first pet cemeteries to allow people to be laid to rest with their animal companions. Her name is already set into the grassy turf there, on a bronze plaque with a photograph of her as a young woman snuggled in bed with five dogs. But now the 69-year-old worries that her final resting place may have to be someplace else.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
As a blazing sun beat down on the city Tuesday, Rock Island - the moated exhibit at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore where African penguins zip through cool, shallow waters - seemed a good place to be. But the Druid Hill Park enclosure is nothing compared to the new digs planned for the zoo's prized colony of endangered birds. In a move to further enhance what is already considered one of North America's most robust breeding grounds for African penguins, zoo officials started construction this week on a $10.4 million, 1.5-acre exhibit for the birds to call home.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | July 4, 1992
A magical sight is three zebra galloping across an African plain-- even if the plain is a small patch of Maryland grass. They are free, yet mysteriously joined as if harnessed in a troika. They start together, stop together and almost-touch the whole way.This is what you would never see in an old zoo cage with a solitary animal standing forlornly on concrete doing nothing all day, all life.In that cage, you might see the markings more clearly: the marvel of the individual animal. But the trade-off is not even close.
NEWS
September 8, 2010
Rob Kasper wrote a heartfelt editorial on Saturday about the beauty and charm of Baltimore's largest and most vital public park, Druid Hill ("Heart of a city," Sept. 4). Unfortunately, Druid Hill Park's heart, and greatest asset, was hardly mentioned. The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , formerly known as the Baltimore Zoo, is literally in the center of the park, encompassing 135 acres of the park's 745. It employs 240 people and cares for more than 1,200 animals representing more than 175 species.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
Where is the government support for the 24-year-old institution that provides community coalescence and a clean family environment for Maryland residents ("Zoo closing in Cecil Co. was cited by USDA," Aug. 7)? While Baltimore's Druid Hill Park zoo receives millions in federal and state aid, Plumpton Park Zoo in Rising Sun must close because the 82-year-old owner cannot single handedly carry the load any longer. I think it is shameful for both Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Benjamin L. Cardin to not step in and offer assistance to the residents and communities of North East, Maryland in their time of need.
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