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NEWS
October 1, 1993
"The Baltimore Waltz," a play by Paula Vogel, will open the Western Maryland College theater department's 1993-1994 season Oct. 9.This preview performance will begin at 8 p.m. on the Understage in Alumni Hall. It also will be presented at three performances Oct. 21-23."The Baltimore Waltz" relates the adventures of a man and his sister, a school teacher who has a fatal disease. They travel to Europe in search of a cure and one last stab at life. The absurdity of their situation is resolved only when one of them confronts an unexpected tragedy, leaving the audience dumbfounded.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 24, 2007
Lengths of snowy paper cover the floor of the rectangular stage at Sydonne's Event Hall. They drift around the bedposts and the ankles of the actors. Several strips, unrolled, form a makeshift screen for video projections. I thought at first that the streamers were made of crepe paper. But, it's not - the stuff is a disposable tissue found in finer bathrooms everywhere. And the decision to use toilet paper as a stage prop symbolizes much of what is right, but also some of what goes wrong, in this production of playwright Paula Vogel's The Baltimore Waltz.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 9, 1992
The play is called "The Baltimore Waltz"; it has references to& Baltimore, slides of Baltimore -- it's even set in Baltimore. But you don't need these home-town touches to feel a deep connection to this rare and magnificent work.A celebration of life at the same time it is a heart-rending evocation of loss, "The Baltimore Waltz" -- which opened last night as part of Center Stage's re:Discovery series -- is the most moving play the theater has produced this season, and arguably for several seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 5, 1999
Playwright Paula Vogel embraces tough subject matter. The former Marylander tackled AIDS in "The Baltimore Waltz" and pedophilia in her Pulitzer Prize-winning "How I Learned to Drive." In "Hot 'n' Throbbing" she takes on pornography and domestic violence. On Thursday, this provocative family drama opens the season at Washington's Arena Stage, where Vogel is writer in residence. Described by Vogel as "maybe one of the most painful and difficult plays I'll ever write, and ... also dangerously funny," the script has been substantially revised for this production.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 9, 1992
The play is called "The Baltimore Waltz"; it has references to Baltimore, slides of Baltimore -- it's even set in Baltimore. But you don't need these home-town touches to feel a deep connection to this rare and magnificent work.A celebration of life at the same time it is a heart-rending evocation of loss, "The Baltimore Waltz" -- which opened last night as part of Center Stage's re:Discovery series -- is the most moving play the theater has produced this season, and arguably for several seasons.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 29, 1992
In her notes to the published script of "The Baltimore Waltz," playwright Paula Vogel writes: "In 1986, my brother Carl invited me to join him in a joint excursion to Europe. Due to pressures of time and money, I declined, never dreaming that he was HIV-positive."In 1988, Carl Vogel died of AIDS. His sister has described him as the person she loved the most. She was also one of his principal caretakers during his illness and treatment, which included participation in an early experimental program with the drug AZT at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 27, 1992
It comes back in a flash -- the piercing, visceral impact of Center Stage's production of Paula Vogel's "The Baltimore Waltz" last April.Before I took my seat in the theater, I had read the play and interviewed the playwright; I felt I was prepared for a highly emotional experience. But nothing could have prepared me for the heart-rending blow dealt by this brilliant, inventive, magnificently realized work, in which a Maryland-bred playwright used fantasy, humor and, most of all, imagination to come to terms with the loss of her brother Carl, who died of AIDS in 1988.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 24, 2007
Lengths of snowy paper cover the floor of the rectangular stage at Sydonne's Event Hall. They drift around the bedposts and the ankles of the actors. Several strips, unrolled, form a makeshift screen for video projections. I thought at first that the streamers were made of crepe paper. But, it's not - the stuff is a disposable tissue found in finer bathrooms everywhere. And the decision to use toilet paper as a stage prop symbolizes much of what is right, but also some of what goes wrong, in this production of playwright Paula Vogel's The Baltimore Waltz.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 19, 1992
The characters in Paula Vogel's "The Baltimore Waltz" include the Little Dutch Boy who put his finger in the dike and Harry Lime from the Orson Welles movie "The Third Man." And the offbeat tone of Center Stage's current production suggests Hollywood -- or even Disneyland.And yet, "The Baltimore Waltz" is about AIDS. It is one of the first examples of a new group of AIDS plays that has moved beyond the initial informational, docudrama approach and begun to treat the subject more metaphorically, fantastically, even comically.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 2, 1992
A special performance of Paula Vogel's "The Baltimore Waltz" will be held at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St., at 8 p.m. on Monday to benefit AIDSWALK '92. The play is a metaphorical journey loosely based on the author's experiences caring for her brother Carl, who died of AIDS in 1988.AIDSWALK '92 is coordinated by Health Education Resource Organization (HERO) and raises funds for AIDS service providers throughout central Maryland. The fifth annual walk will be held May 31 and is expected to raise $500,000.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 15, 1998
Although Paula Vogel was clearly thrilled to win the Pulitzer Prize in drama, the playwright said yesterday that the news was also bittersweet. Her mixed emotions stemmed from her mother's unexpected death in January.Reached at her home in Providence, R.I., Vogel explained she had dedicated her recently published volume, "The Mammary Plays" -- which includes "How I Learned to Drive" -- to her mother as a birthday surprise, but it was a surprise her mother didn't live to see."This is kind of a strange one, but I have to believe that they're somewhere dancing," said Vogel, 46, referring also to her father, who died in September, and her late brother Carl, whose 1988 death from AIDS was the subject of her play "The Baltimore Waltz," which was set partly at Johns Hopkins Hospital and was produced at Center Stage in 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 8, 1995
Playwright Paula Vogel has said about "The Baltimore Waltz" -- the play she wrote in response to her brother's death -- that she can look at the audience and tell who's a member of "the community of loss."That kind of loss is what is referred to in Jacqueline Reingold's bittersweet "Lost and Found," which is receiving a touching premiere at AXIS Theatre.The play begins, however, with a more literal definition of "lost." A vacationing New Yorker named Sara loses her way in rural Colorado.Although a good Samaritan comes to her aid, Sara is initially more afraid of him than of Colorado's dark, forbidding woods.
NEWS
October 1, 1993
"The Baltimore Waltz," a play by Paula Vogel, will open the Western Maryland College theater department's 1993-1994 season Oct. 9.This preview performance will begin at 8 p.m. on the Understage in Alumni Hall. It also will be presented at three performances Oct. 21-23."The Baltimore Waltz" relates the adventures of a man and his sister, a school teacher who has a fatal disease. They travel to Europe in search of a cure and one last stab at life. The absurdity of their situation is resolved only when one of them confronts an unexpected tragedy, leaving the audience dumbfounded.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 27, 1992
It comes back in a flash -- the piercing, visceral impact of Center Stage's production of Paula Vogel's "The Baltimore Waltz" last April.Before I took my seat in the theater, I had read the play and interviewed the playwright; I felt I was prepared for a highly emotional experience. But nothing could have prepared me for the heart-rending blow dealt by this brilliant, inventive, magnificently realized work, in which a Maryland-bred playwright used fantasy, humor and, most of all, imagination to come to terms with the loss of her brother Carl, who died of AIDS in 1988.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 19, 1992
The characters in Paula Vogel's "The Baltimore Waltz" include the Little Dutch Boy who put his finger in the dike and Harry Lime from the Orson Welles movie "The Third Man." And the offbeat tone of Center Stage's current production suggests Hollywood -- or even Disneyland.And yet, "The Baltimore Waltz" is about AIDS. It is one of the first examples of a new group of AIDS plays that has moved beyond the initial informational, docudrama approach and begun to treat the subject more metaphorically, fantastically, even comically.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 9, 1992
The play is called "The Baltimore Waltz"; it has references to Baltimore, slides of Baltimore -- it's even set in Baltimore. But you don't need these home-town touches to feel a deep connection to this rare and magnificent work.A celebration of life at the same time it is a heart-rending evocation of loss, "The Baltimore Waltz" -- which opened last night as part of Center Stage's re:Discovery series -- is the most moving play the theater has produced this season, and arguably for several seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 5, 1999
Playwright Paula Vogel embraces tough subject matter. The former Marylander tackled AIDS in "The Baltimore Waltz" and pedophilia in her Pulitzer Prize-winning "How I Learned to Drive." In "Hot 'n' Throbbing" she takes on pornography and domestic violence. On Thursday, this provocative family drama opens the season at Washington's Arena Stage, where Vogel is writer in residence. Described by Vogel as "maybe one of the most painful and difficult plays I'll ever write, and ... also dangerously funny," the script has been substantially revised for this production.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 15, 1998
Although Paula Vogel was clearly thrilled to win the Pulitzer Prize in drama, the playwright said yesterday that the news was also bittersweet. Her mixed emotions stemmed from her mother's unexpected death in January.Reached at her home in Providence, R.I., Vogel explained she had dedicated her recently published volume, "The Mammary Plays" -- which includes "How I Learned to Drive" -- to her mother as a birthday surprise, but it was a surprise her mother didn't live to see."This is kind of a strange one, but I have to believe that they're somewhere dancing," said Vogel, 46, referring also to her father, who died in September, and her late brother Carl, whose 1988 death from AIDS was the subject of her play "The Baltimore Waltz," which was set partly at Johns Hopkins Hospital and was produced at Center Stage in 1992.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 9, 1992
The play is called "The Baltimore Waltz"; it has references to& Baltimore, slides of Baltimore -- it's even set in Baltimore. But you don't need these home-town touches to feel a deep connection to this rare and magnificent work.A celebration of life at the same time it is a heart-rending evocation of loss, "The Baltimore Waltz" -- which opened last night as part of Center Stage's re:Discovery series -- is the most moving play the theater has produced this season, and arguably for several seasons.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 2, 1992
A special performance of Paula Vogel's "The Baltimore Waltz" will be held at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St., at 8 p.m. on Monday to benefit AIDSWALK '92. The play is a metaphorical journey loosely based on the author's experiences caring for her brother Carl, who died of AIDS in 1988.AIDSWALK '92 is coordinated by Health Education Resource Organization (HERO) and raises funds for AIDS service providers throughout central Maryland. The fifth annual walk will be held May 31 and is expected to raise $500,000.
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