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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1995
Maryland's largest environmental group and one of Baltimore's oldest civil rights organizations have formed an unusual alliance, pledging to work together to improve job opportunities for urban youth, reduce toxic pollution and help revitalize the city.The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the Baltimore Urban League were to announce their agreement and a five-year joint strategy at a press conference today."It is so apparent that to save the bay you've got to save the cities," William C. Baker, president of the Annapolis-based foundation, said yesterday.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Marcella E. Grice, an artist and calligrapher, died April 13 from complications of heart disease at Sinai Hospital. She was 87. The daughter of an insurance executive and a homemaker, the former Marcella Editha Harman was born in Baltimore and raised in Charles Village. Mrs. Grice, who was known as Editha, graduated in 1942 from Seton High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1946 from what is now Notre Dame of Maryland University. In the 1980s, she earned a master's degree in audio-visual communication from Towson University.
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NEWS
June 17, 1996
The Real Estate Watch column in the Real Estate section of yesterday's editions gave an incorrect date for a meeting of the Baltimore Campaign, an initiative to promote the city that is coordinated by the Citizens Planning and Housing Association.The meeting is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 10: 30 a.m. July 18 at the Baltimore Urban League.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/17/96
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN REPORTER | November 19, 2006
Masquerade balls, most times, bring out clever costumes and masks, but little to speak of in the fashion department. But when the Greater Baltimore Leadership Association of the Baltimore Urban League has its annual ball, it's guaranteed that some of the city's most fashionable will step out in their finest black-tie duds. This month, Randallstown resident Tynese Daniels arrived at the B&O Railroad Museum for the group's fourth gala in fall's most stylish color -- red. And she deftly defied the tendency toward sparkles that evening events inspire by wearing tasteful gold jewelry on her neck and ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | February 14, 1999
Nine hundred celebrators gathered to laud legends in civil rights and song at the Baltimore Urban League's 75th Anniversary Gala at the Hyatt Regency. The notables numbered in the double digits as they gathered to dine on filet mignon and enjoy the dulcet tones of Grammy-winning jazz vocalist Nancy Wilson.Among those honored for their humanitarian efforts: Dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine Dr. Donald Wilson; historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch; Maryland state Sen. Clarence Blount; and Chaplain Emeritus of Johns Hopkins University Chester Wickwire.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON | January 5, 2006
Local high school bands will march alongside Baltimore civil rights leaders at the city's sixth Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade on Jan. 16. With the theme, "Celebrating Yesterday's Victories, Facing Today's Challenges," the parade will honor five local activists as grand marshals: the Rev. Douglas Sands of New Waverly United Methodist Church; Marvin "Doc" Cheatham, president of the Baltimore NAACP branch; entrepreneur and Greater Baltimore Urban League...
NEWS
February 26, 1998
IT IS A tribute to the staff and volunteers of the Baltimore Urban League that tonight's 41st annual Equal Opportunity Dinner is a sellout.Through most of the year, they quietly go about the business of ensuring that a wide range of employment, housing and other services, including nationally acclaimed programs that use computer technology to benefit the inner city, are available to Baltimore-area residents. One night a year, though, their efforts are saluted by the corporate and political leaders of this community.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2001
Homebuyers seeking aid through the city's Settlement Expense Loan Program will have to complete free home counseling, beginning Sept. 30, before they sign contracts as part of an effort to prevent fraud and property flipping. SELP is used by homebuyers to cover closing costs. The program offers loans up to $5,000 with a 9.25 percent interest rate for a 10-year term. The home must be a primary residence in Baltimore City, and the price cannot exceed $275,000. There are no income limits, but the buyer has to contribute $1,000 toward the purchase.
NEWS
By Staff Report | May 7, 1993
Minority males between the ages of 14 and 29 will have an opportunity to tell officials how Baltimore services can better meet their needs at a conference today and tomorrow.The "Minority Male Charette" will be held from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. both days at the Baltimore Urban League headquarters at 512 Orchard St.The event is free, but seating is limited; call 396-6422 to reserve a seat."We really want to hear from these young men," said Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who mentioned specifically the issue of police-community relations.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | February 23, 1991
The Baltimore Urban League took a big step toward moving its headquarters into the historic Orchard Street Church this month by selecting a joint venture of Kelly Clayton & Mojzisek and Morgan State University professor Anthony Johns to serve as the architects for the project.More than 50 architectural and engineering teams originally expressed interest in working on the $6 million project, which involves restoring the 1882 church at 521 Orchard St. to its original appearance and transforming the interior to house both office space for the Urban League and a large African-American cultural art center and museum.
NEWS
August 26, 2006
A Carroll County woman suspected of starting a fire at a Westminster restaurant on Aug. 4 was arrested yesterday, authorities said. Joan Glover Ecker, 35, of the 100 block of Brookview Court in Westminster was charged with first- and second-degree arson in an early morning fire that caused approximately $10,000 in damage to Harry's Main Street Restaurant, closing the business for four days, police said. Ecker, the opening breakfast cook at the restaurant, was being held yesterday afternoon at Carroll County Detention Center awaiting a bail review, authorities said.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON | January 5, 2006
Local high school bands will march alongside Baltimore civil rights leaders at the city's sixth Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade on Jan. 16. With the theme, "Celebrating Yesterday's Victories, Facing Today's Challenges," the parade will honor five local activists as grand marshals: the Rev. Douglas Sands of New Waverly United Methodist Church; Marvin "Doc" Cheatham, president of the Baltimore NAACP branch; entrepreneur and Greater Baltimore Urban League...
BUSINESS
By Will Morton and Will Morton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 2004
Karen French lives the ultimate city life: She walks eight minutes to work, owns a single-family home across from a park and lives a few blocks away from cultural institutions. And she is steps away from downtown in relatively unknown Seton Hill. "We're right in the heart of it," said French, 41, a painting restorer at the Walters Art Museum. On the downside, there's no back yard at the house she shares with her two small children and husband, a puppeteer who runs a theater in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
For a few minutes yesterday, Dayvon Love was running to be the next president of the United States, and the students in Room 321 of Digital Harbor High School were the voters he was trying to win over. Gleaming from behind a podium in a white suit and black tie, the Forest Park High senior outlined his plans to boost the economy and reduce the nation's budget deficit. "The first issue we need to fix is the loss of jobs," Dayvon said, his voice booming and confident. "Next, what I propose is to increase taxes on the top 2 percent.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
For a few minutes yesterday, Dayvon Love was running to be the next president of the United States, and the students in Room 321 of Digital Harbor High School were the voters he was trying to win over. Gleaming from behind a podium in a white suit and black tie, the Forest Park High senior outlined his plans to boost the economy and reduce the nation's budget deficit. "The first issue we need to fix is the loss of jobs," Dayvon said, his voice booming and confident. "Next, what I propose is to increase taxes on the top 2 percent.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 29, 2004
THE "DIPLOMA" he received Friday morning in the large ceremonial courtroom in the grand old courthouse in downtown Baltimore was not the first in Jerome Anderson's 53 years. He'd graduated from City College and obtained a bachelor's degree from Antioch when that Ohio-based university had a satellite campus in Baltimore. And let's not forget the master's degree in social work from Howard University, either. Years ago - what must seem to him like three lifetimes ago - Jerome Anderson was on the smart track to further his education and have a successful career in human services.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN REPORTER | November 19, 2006
Masquerade balls, most times, bring out clever costumes and masks, but little to speak of in the fashion department. But when the Greater Baltimore Leadership Association of the Baltimore Urban League has its annual ball, it's guaranteed that some of the city's most fashionable will step out in their finest black-tie duds. This month, Randallstown resident Tynese Daniels arrived at the B&O Railroad Museum for the group's fourth gala in fall's most stylish color -- red. And she deftly defied the tendency toward sparkles that evening events inspire by wearing tasteful gold jewelry on her neck and ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 18, 2003
Greater Baltimore Urban League An elegant, but comfortable, feeling filled the Marriott Waterfront Hotel's mezzanine lobby during the cocktail hour of the Greater Baltimore Urban League's annual "Equal Opportunity Day Dinner & Awards Gala." Some 420 guests, dressed in glittery gowns and crisp tuxedos, embraced old friends and caught up before dinner. Inside the ballroom, the first course, tantalizing bunches of spring greens wrapped in cucumber slices and garnished with poached pear slices, was being set out on dinner tables.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 7, 2003
In Baltimore City Man, 21, is found fatally shot on west-side street A 21-year-old man fatally shot last night on a street in West Baltimore street during an attempted robbery became the city's 100th homicide victim of the year, police said. Terence Chapman of the 4300 block of Seminole Ave. was found about 8:30 p.m. by Western District officers in the first block of N. Bentalou St. He was lying on the pavement, bleeding from a bullet wound to the chest that pierced his heart, police said.
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