Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaltimore Teachers Union
IN THE NEWS

Baltimore Teachers Union

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | January 30, 2014
The Baltimore Teachers Union announced Tuesday a tentative contract that would give city teachers a 1 percent raise every year until 2016 and revise a career ladder introduced in 2010 that allowed teachers to move up the pay ladder faster. According to the agreement, which can be viewed here,  teachers will receive an automatic 1 percent pay raise next month, in addition to 1 percent raises in July 2014 and July 2015. The union's health care also stays intact. Teachers are still eligible to earn more money by moving up four levels of career pathways -- standard, professional, model and lead -- as they accumulate credits called "achievement units.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 16, 2014
About 100 Baltimore educators rallied at city school headquarters Monday, protesting last-minute changes to their evaluation system that the teachers union vowed it would fight to reverse. But district officials say doing so would result in "lower standards" in the classroom. The protest, which culminated a tumultuous school year that included an avalanche of snow days and reforms, was in response to the district changing what are called "cut scores" in the rubric that rates teachers "highly effective," "effective," "developing," and "ineffective.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Daja Dorsey had a list of things she was looking for in the perfect prom dress. And as the senior at Baltimore's Coppin Academy High School perused racks of dresses Saturday, looking for something short and sparkly, she was relieved to have at least one thing crossed off: an affordable price tag. Dorsey walked away from the Baltimore Teachers Union headquarters - where high school seniors were invited to come shop through donated formal wear -...
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 13, 2014
Baltimore city teachers will close out the school year with a rally at the district's central headquarters Monday, where they will protest last-minute changes to the district's teacher evaluation system that stands to hinder teachers' ability to move up in pay. The issue stems from changes to a scoring system that rates teachers "highly effective,"  "effective," "developing" or "ineffective. " The district said it recently raised the scores -- for example, the score for a "highly effective" under the originally published system was an 80, and is now an 86 -- because student test scores wouldn't be used in evaluating teachers this year.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 13, 2014
Baltimore city teachers will close out the school year with a rally at the district's central headquarters Monday, where they will protest last-minute changes to the district's teacher evaluation system that stands to hinder teachers' ability to move up in pay. The issue stems from changes to a scoring system that rates teachers "highly effective,"  "effective," "developing" or "ineffective. " The district said it recently raised the scores -- for example, the score for a "highly effective" under the originally published system was an 80, and is now an 86 -- because student test scores wouldn't be used in evaluating teachers this year.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
On any given day, the activity in Ellen Vikestad's classroom would resemble a round of bumper cars. As Vikestad and her special-needs students at Claremont High School have made their way from one end of her cramped classroom to the other for lessons, they do so in a 15-minute navigation of instruments, desks and one another. On Tuesday, officials from the Baltimore Teachers Union and the city school system surprised Vikestad with news: Soon that would change. Vikestad, in her fifth year of teaching music therapy at Claremont — a tiny school that offers a life-skills curriculum for its 61 students who are not pursuing diplomas — won the BTU Extreme Classroom Makeover contest, held every year by the local union and its parent organization, the American Federation of Teachers.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | May 15, 2013
The Baltimore Teacher's Union has called for the district hold off on attaching penalties to schools' performance on the the new  Common Core assessments, citing insufficient professional development and resources to implement the new high-stakes curriculum. In a news release, BTU's President Marietta English echoed the call of one of the nation's largest teachers union, the American Federation of Teachers, which called for a moratorium on penalties associated with the standardized testing that will measure a radically new curricula being rolled out across the nation, including Maryland, next year.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
As Baltimore school and teacher union officials prepare to return to the negotiating table next week, they said they don't expect to make significant changes to the tentative agreement that educators rejected Thursday and will concentrate instead on clearly explaining the terms of the innovative contract. Bargaining teams for the Baltimore Teachers Union and the school district said they are optimistic that they can reach an agreement that educators will approve. The contract, which was one of the most contentious to be introduced in the city, was rejected by 58 percent of the 2,600 union members who cast ballots this week.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
The head of the Baltimore Teachers Union's teacher chapter was overwhelmingly defeated in her re-election bid this week, losing to the candidate she narrowly ousted in a bitter campaign two years ago. President Sharon Y. Blake received 380 votes to Marietta A. English's 598 votes, said Carla M. Tyler, a spokeswoman for the union. Eugene C. Chong Qui, John Richard Perkins and Walter Marse, who also had been seeking the presidency, received 31 votes, 19 votes and 11 votes, respectively, Tyler said.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
Reuben Ash, a former city schoolteacher and city teachers' union official, died Tuesday from a blood clot at Children's Hospital. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 62. Mr. Ash was active with the Baltimore Teachers Union for nearly 30 years, helping to protect and negotiate the rights of teachers and paraprofessionals. He retired in 1996 as the BTU's director of organization. "He was a real down-to-earth person and not one of those heady types," said Sharon Wilson, a BTU employee who knew Mr. Ash for more than 25 years.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Daja Dorsey had a list of things she was looking for in the perfect prom dress. And as the senior at Baltimore's Coppin Academy High School perused racks of dresses Saturday, looking for something short and sparkly, she was relieved to have at least one thing crossed off: an affordable price tag. Dorsey walked away from the Baltimore Teachers Union headquarters - where high school seniors were invited to come shop through donated formal wear -...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Baltimore teachers voted Thursday to ratify a three-year contract that will give them annual raises of 1 percent and opportunities for promotion, but leaves uncertainty about evaluations and a career ladder that was introduced three years ago. Union officials said that more than 1,000 votes were cast, with the majority in favor of the contract. They said specific vote counts would only be released to members of the union. Marietta English, president of the Baltimore Teachers Union, said the pact "demonstrates Baltimore teachers' willingness to create incentives for boosting teacher and student performance.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
On any given day, a teacher's mailbox is usually chock full of messages: leaflets advertising professional development, discount coupons for office supplies, publications from curriculum companies, and book club invitations. But under a contract that teachers are expected to vote on Thursday, they fear that such communication would cease - unless it comes from the Baltimore Teachers Union. City teachers are criticizing an unusual clause included in the proposed contract that appears to give the union the exclusive right to disseminate information via email or through teachers' mailboxes.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | January 30, 2014
The Baltimore Teachers Union announced Tuesday a tentative contract that would give city teachers a 1 percent raise every year until 2016 and revise a career ladder introduced in 2010 that allowed teachers to move up the pay ladder faster. According to the agreement, which can be viewed here,  teachers will receive an automatic 1 percent pay raise next month, in addition to 1 percent raises in July 2014 and July 2015. The union's health care also stays intact. Teachers are still eligible to earn more money by moving up four levels of career pathways -- standard, professional, model and lead -- as they accumulate credits called "achievement units.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Jan. 12, 1985: Harford Community College ends its men's basketball season when nine of the 11 players are declared academically ineligible. "They're students first," athletic director John Haggerty says. "We're concerned about how they are going to feed themselves 10 years down the road, and not many of them are going to do that through sports. " Jan. 17, 1971: The Colts edge the Dallas Cowboys, 16-13 in Super Bowl V, giving Baltimore back-to-back world champions. Three months earlier, the Orioles defeated the Cincinnati Reds to win the World Series.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
An immigrant Ivory Coast worker told a West Baltimore church congregation Sunday what it's like to make $11.50 an hour washing dishes at a food concession at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport — and struggle to make ends meet. "I try to do the best to raise my son," said Dezi Kodiane, a Cherry Hill resident who was a guest speaker at Metropolitan United Methodist Church in Lafayette Square. He appeared as part of an effort by Interfaith Worker Justice of Maryland to connect low wage workers with religious congregations.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 9, 2013
The Baltimore City school board on Tuesday approved the hiring of a prominent, Iowa-based firm to conduct a national search for a permanent CEO to lead Baltimore schools. Ray and Associates Inc., which has helped fill executive seats in school districts across the state, won a $46,800 competitively bid contract, according to school officials. The contract will begin Wednesday and last through July 9, 2014. The firm was most recently tapped to conduct the superintendent search in Howard County and has conducted searches for Anne Arundel County.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.