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Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
One reads it in a diary entry. Another hears it in a song. Yet another feels it in an aging mansion. The War of 1812 is often referred to as a forgotten war. Yet for the descendants of those who witnessed the Battle of Baltimore, the conflict remains vivid. It was two centuries ago this week that British ships descended on Baltimore to deliver a death blow to the young United States. They had seized and burned Washington, and they thought they would score an easy victory here.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
This week, Varsity Letters will take an in-depth look at the boys and girls soccer programs in various counties and leagues in the Baltimore area. On Wednesday, Howard County will be featured. Also, please be sure to check out the complete boys and girls soccer preview section, which is online now and running in today's print edition of The Baltimore Sun. Here's a closer look at the Howard girls: After winning their second straight Class 3A state crown, River Hill is deservedly the highest-ranked public school in The Baltimore Sun's Top 15 preseason poll, coming in at No. 2 behind McDonogh.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
City Councilman James B. Kraft says he's hired two investigators to help complete a City Council probe of Baltimore's troubled speed camera system.   Two paralegals - - who are paid $32 and $26 per hour, respectively - - from the Robert Half Legal staffing firm began work last week reviewing thousands of documents that the Rawlings-Blake administration turned over to Kraft's committee.   “The mayor has approved the money for two full-time investigators for up to three months,” Kraft said.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Today begins my twentieth year teaching copy editing at Loyola University Maryland (and, coincidentally, my twenty-eighth at The Baltimore Sun ). This post, the latest iteration of my first-day-of-class cautions, is what the students in CM 361: Copy Editing, heard this morning. It is only right, honorable, and just for me to let you know what you are in for. This is not a gut course. This is not an easy “A.” Some will take home a “C” at semester's end and consider yourselves lucky to have it.  Here is what one of your predecessors wrote at RateMyProfessors.com: “He is a horrible teacher.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
With the high school football underway for the private schools and the public schools set to kick off their seasons on Friday or Saturday, The Baltimore Sun is rolling out its Top 5 teams leading up to the full preview on Thursday. This morning, We go back to Anne Arundel County for our No. 4. The Sun will count down the Top 5, leading to No. 1 on Wednesday evening. The entire Top 15 poll along with players to watch will be published Thursday in The Baltimore Sun and on baltimoresun.com.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | August 31, 2014
Fifty years ago this summer, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, marking a watershed moment in our nation's history and in the ongoing struggle of African-Americans for fair and equal treatment. The passage of the law, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin, and ended voter discrimination and segregation of schools, came amidst a tumultuous period that saw sit-ins, marches and mass protests staged from major cities to college campuses of every size.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley has imposed strict new rules to limit when the state may hold immigrants in Baltimore's jail at the request of federal authorities, dealing a new blow to a national program intended to catch people who are in the country illegally. The governor's policy, which was made public Friday by immigration advocates, comes in response to a recent opinion from the Maryland attorney general's office, which found that detaining immigrants in local jails beyond their scheduled release without probable cause is likely a violation of the Fourth Amendment.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
I can't recall the last time that a commercial real estate development site spilled more than 3 million gallons of raw sewage into the Maryland waterways but that's what the state of Maryland did last week ( "3 million-gallon sewage spill reported at Wagner's Point," Aug. 15). Maryland has instituted overwhelming changes over the last few years on commercial real estate development concerning storm water runoff on all development sites throughout the state. These changes were made to control the amount of rain water that leaves commercial sites.
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