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NEWS
April 16, 2014
As an educator, it was with genuine excitement that I read the recent editorial, "The day After graduation" (April 7), followed one day later by a commentary, "Demand for STEM workers outpaces supply" (April 8). These articles shined a bright light on a movement that is absolutely vital to our local schools and communities in Baltimore City with regard to innovative career and college readiness and our future workforce. The formula for success of a career and college-ready school is the product of great educational environments, dedicated, excited and knowledgeable teachers and advisers and partnerships with a network of entrepreneurs, trades people, corporations and unions who respond to the call to action, especially when helping to plan and execute the programs which prepare students for careers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 16, 2014
Baltimore City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young is requesting that school officials brief city leaders on the extent to which students are receiving a "complete education" in their schools. Young will introduce a resolution Monday that seeks information about offerings like arts and physical education. In a release, Young said a lack of arts and physical education, or what he calls an "incomplete curriculum," has been a disservice to city students. “A focus on basic education that leaves arts education and physical education aside ignores the competencies demanded by the complex, modern world in which Baltimore City Public Schools students are expected to thrive,” Young said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
It's an Olympics of sorts for financial analysts in training, and five business students from the University of Baltimore will compete. They are traveling to Denver for the regional round of a global challenge to create the best equity research report about a public company. On Wednesday, they'll face student teams from across North America and South America. The annual international contest, in its eighth year, is sponsored by the CFA Institute, an investment professionals trade group that offers the Chartered Financial Analysts designation.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A group of Baltimore students are calling on the school board to pull out of its agreement to purchase energy from a planned plant that would burn waste within a mile of two schools in one of the most polluted neighborhoods of the city. Students from Benjamin Franklin High School have reignited a debate over the Fairfield Renewable Energy Project - what the students and environmental advocates consider an incinerator - that was approved in 2010 and would be the largest of its kind in the nation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
Donald and Mary Banks of Rosedale have their son, Marcus, in a Catholic school for eighth grade, but the Baltimore County residents were shopping for a high school in the city Saturday, three of the thousands of people browsing through a bazaar of middle and high school offerings at the Poly-Western complex. "I feel overwhelmed. It's hard to pick," said Marcus, 14, after emerging from the noisy, crowded hallways and cafeteria jammed with individual booths for each of 65 city public schools competing for students.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
As the Newtown, Conn., community looks for comfort in the wake of one of the most deadly school shootings in history, it will be able to tap into the hearts of students in Baltimore City. Students at Dallas F. Nicholas Sr. Elementary School have joined a national movement called "Paper Hearts Across America," an initiative that started over construction paper and scissors in the home of a Billings, Mont., family and has sparked a nationwide effort to send millions of hearts to Connecticut.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
A chant resembling a rally at a college stadium rang from a first-grade classroom at the Baltimore charter school KIPP Harmony Academy. "M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D," the children sang, pumping their fists. "Maryland will win!" This week's activity helped introduce the 5- and 6-year-olds to a new school year at KIPP, where conversations about "climbing the mountain to college" begin in kindergarten and classrooms take on the identity of colleges and universities that children can aspire to attend.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
Don't get into business to make money. The temptation to quit will be strongest just before you succeed. And take big risks — even if that means angering a ruler-wielding, 6-foot-tall nun. Those were among the lessons billionaire Bob Parsons, the founder of GoDaddy.com, shared with students at his alma mater, University of Baltimore, on Monday evening. Parsons, a 1975 graduate of the university, gave $1 million last summer to endow a professorship in digital communication, which blends computer programming, Web design and writing, among other skills.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2011
Baltimore's scores on a rigorous national math and reading test were in the bottom third of large urban school districts across the country, though educators highlighted some progress in math and a promising trend of better-than-average results among some low-income black students. Overall achievement was poor on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, a test Congress mandated be given to a sampling of students across the nation every two years. The results released Wednesday showed that the city's children in fourth and eighth grades are scoring better than those in Detroit, Washington and Cleveland but behind those in New York, Boston and Atlanta.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1995
Touring the silos and fields of a Howard County dairy farm at 20 mph in a wagon hauled by a farm tractor was fun.But the Baltimore middle-school students were more interested in the cows they saw -- and the flies the stench attracted."
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
When Beechfield Elementary/Middle School fifth-graders were asked to design their dream homes 15 years ago, they almost always included a "safe room," a place where they could escape violence, according to Ayers Saint Gross president Jim Wheeler. Today, none do. Their dream houses have video game rooms and swimming pools. It's a particularly gratifying shift for the architects volunteering in the West Baltimore public school to see. "One day, we'll hire one of these students," Wheeler said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When John Crosby takes his final exams this week, it will be a lot like playing "Jeopardy. " Every question could be the one that costs the Polytechnic Institute senior thousands of dollars. The basketball player has 20 potential athletic scholarships, totaling more than $1 million, riding on his final exams, which he must score well on to maintain his GPA and choose from universities like Cornell and Xavier. It's a daunting task at the rigorous Poly — made even more difficult by a citywide policy that gives less weight to grades in Advanced Placement and honors courses than any other school district in the Baltimore region.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
I have yet to see anyone bring up that many of the "gifted" children do not do well in a traditional classroom because they are seen as different - as strange little nerds who think differently - and frequently have difficulties because of this ( "Keeping Baltimore afloat," May 6). This changes when they are in a class with others like them. They discover that they are not alone in the world. Lasting friendships blossom and school is no longer hated. These children are bonded across economic and ethnic lines because of what's in their heads.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
As an educator, it was with genuine excitement that I read the recent editorial, "The day After graduation" (April 7), followed one day later by a commentary, "Demand for STEM workers outpaces supply" (April 8). These articles shined a bright light on a movement that is absolutely vital to our local schools and communities in Baltimore City with regard to innovative career and college readiness and our future workforce. The formula for success of a career and college-ready school is the product of great educational environments, dedicated, excited and knowledgeable teachers and advisers and partnerships with a network of entrepreneurs, trades people, corporations and unions who respond to the call to action, especially when helping to plan and execute the programs which prepare students for careers.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
After a busy first semester last year at Boston University, Hayley Spivey was eager to head home to Florida for spring break. Yet while the theater arts major enjoyed the sun and fun, she also found herself slightly bored. "It was nice seeing my family and friends," recalled Spivey, 19. "But other than relaxing, I didn't do much else. " This year, however, the sophomore was in Maryland for her school break, taking part in a movement that's swept college campuses nationwide. Known as Alternative Spring Break, the concept, which gained popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, centers around students performing community service during their time off, instead of, say, participating in wild parties or beach escapes.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
Baltimore County school officials found a gun that shoots plastic pellets in the backpack of a student at Charlesmont Elementary School in Dundalk on Wednesday. Students tipped off school officials who went to the student's class and found the air soft gun, according to Dale Rauenzahn, Baltimore County's executive director of student support services. The student first brought the gun to school Tuesday, Rauenzahn said, and school officials are trying to encourage students to come forward immediately when they have information about a weapon.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2009
Salary: $36,000 Age: 24 Years on the job: Two How she got started: While attending Catholic High School of Baltimore, Schroeder and two friends began a cleaning business. Helping them was mentor Patricia Granata Eisner. Schroeder continued to operate the business while attending what is now Stevenson University, formerly Villa Julie College, as an English major. She approached Granata Eisner, the executive director of the Baltimore affiliate of the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE)
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
The success of Baltimore's summer school seems to prove what common sense has told educators and parents for years: Children learn when they are in a small classroom with a good teacher who has lots of time to plan and expects high standards.In the words of school board president J. Tyson Tildon, "Hard work by people who understand and know the educational process pays off."The success also gives city and state school officials powerful evidence to support their proposals to create tough standards for students to pass from one grade to the next.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
It's an Olympics of sorts for financial analysts in training, and five business students from the University of Baltimore will compete. They are traveling to Denver for the regional round of a global challenge to create the best equity research report about a public company. On Wednesday, they'll face student teams from across North America and South America. The annual international contest, in its eighth year, is sponsored by the CFA Institute, an investment professionals trade group that offers the Chartered Financial Analysts designation.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Rumors that a shooting would occur at Gen. John Stricker Middle School on Friday spread quickly over social media the night before, resulting in a message being sent to Baltimore County Superintendent Dallas Dance via Twitter. Dance, who has 10,000 Twitter followers, was sent a tweet at 9:31 p.m. saying, "Do something about this. " The message included a screen shot of another tweet that said, "Apparently there is a planned shooting supposed to happen at Stricker tomorrow. " Dance said he saw the tweet three minutes later and called administrators in charge of school safety.
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