Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaltimore State
IN THE NEWS

Baltimore State

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
After he campaigned on a slogan of "Fight Crime First," many expected that for his first case, Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein would pursue a repeat offender who had slipped through the fingers of the previous regime. Perhaps a drug killing, or a case of witness intimidation. But to the surprise of critics who worried that he would be too cozy with the police who endorsed him, Bernstein chose to try three city officers charged with kidnapping and misconduct after picking up two West Baltimore teens and dropping them off far from home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney was dealt a significant setback Friday when elections officials determined that he did not collect enough signatures to appear on the November ballot. Russell A. Neverdon Sr. fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby, a city official said. Neverdon said he will appeal the decision to Baltimore Circuit Court and, failing that, would consider running a write-in campaign for the job. "This fight has not ended by any stretch of the imagination," Neverdon said outside the offices of the Baltimore City Board of Elections.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 30, 2009
William Franklin Cecil III, a former air traffic controller who later became a lawyer and an assistant state's attorney assigned to the Baltimore Firearms Investigation Enforcement Unit, died Friday of brain cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 59. "Bill was one unique individual. If he had an opinion, you knew about it. He was a fighter in the courtroom and a fighter in life," said Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy. Mr. Cecil, the son of an insurance company executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Putty Hill Avenue.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment Thursday of a senior Baltimore prosecutor and a lawyer at the Homeland Security Department as new federal judges to sit on the Maryland bench. George J. Hazel, who was the top deputy in the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office, was confirmed nomination unanimously. "I have been tremendously appreciative and proud of the opportunity to serve the citizens of Baltimore City for the past three and a half years," Hazel said in a statement, "and I look forward to continuing to serve the public in this important position.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | January 20, 2009
Mark P. Cohen, who as Baltimore's top homicide prosecutor helped take many hundreds of killers off the city's streets, died Sunday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 62. The Mount Washington resident, chief of the homicide division in the Baltimore state's attorney's office, battled melanoma for about a decade but had taken a turn for the worse in recent months. State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said Mr. Cohen tried some of her office's most difficult cases, including those involving the death penalty and those involving police officers.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and John Rivera and Allison Klein and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2002
A priest ousted from his Roman Catholic church in Connecticut because he was found to have sexually abused boys while working as a pastor in Baltimore was never charged here with a crime, even though he confessed, a police report shows. The report from 1987 says that the Rev. Robert Victor Newman, who was expelled from his New Haven church over the weekend, was granted "exceptional clearance" by the Baltimore state's attorney's office despite having admitted to police and prosecutors that he fondled a 14-year-old boy. As a condition of the "exceptional" arrangement, Newman was to continue treatment in a psychiatric hospital rather than face prosecution, the report said.
NEWS
January 24, 2002
"I'VE BEEN working my fanny off to give the citizens everything they deserve, but I need to get funded adequately." - Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy at a news conference Friday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
She won the appointment to Baltimore state's attorney that he wanted in 1995. Later, as mayor, he famously called for her to "get off her ass" and prosecute a case. She said he was "hoodwinking" the public into thinking his crime-fighting strategies were effective. And in one of his last acts before leaving the city, he raised the salary for her office by tens of thousands of dollars, in what many viewed as an attempt to make the position more attractive to challengers. But now Gov. Martin O'Malley and Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia Jessamy — Democrats both locked in re-election fights — appear to be setting aside their differences.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
A 31-year-old Baltimore man was convicted of attempted murder Wednesday for opening fire on a crowded street while yelling "You think you're better than me," according to the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office. On June 26, 2010, Andre K. Haines shot eight rounds at his target, Antoine Free, who was standing on Guilford Avenue with family and friends. Free, who identified Haines as the shooter, was hit three times. Bullets grazed two others. Haines, who was also convicted of two assault counts and handgun offenses, is scheduled for sentencing on May 24; he faces a maximum of life in prison.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2011
A man who opened fire outside Johns Hopkins Hospital in September 2009, injuring a bystander, was sentenced Wednesday to 54 years in prison, the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office announced. Timothy Gaskins, 44, fired five shots that day, striking a woman's handbag, a man's trouser leg and an employee of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, who was leaving work. She was struck in the hand. Police said at the time that they believed the shooting was related to a fight between teen-age girls that drew in their fathers.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Baltimore political consultant Julius Henson appealed Wednesday a Circuit Court ruling that he violated his probation by running for a state Senate seat. His lawyer said Henson's case is bolstered by Wednesday's ruling by the state Court of Special Appeals, which held that former Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold could run for office during his probation for a misconduct conviction. In that case, the appeals court said that while judges have broad power to sentence, the Maryland Board of Elections has the ultimate power to determine who is eligible to run for office.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger filed this week to run for reelection as the county's top prosecutor in 2014. Shellenberger, 54, a Democrat, was elected in 2006, following longtime county State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor, a Republican. He won a contested re-election in 2010. This past year, he was among the most vocal advocates in an unsuccessful effort to fight repeal of the state's death penalty. Shellenberger was hired in the county in 1982, serving as a law clerk and prosecutor before joining the law firm of Peter G. Angelos for 13 years.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Awaiting trial on charges that he and his crew arranged seven shootings to avenge the death of a family member, Robert G. Moore plotted from prison to kill two Baltimore prosecutors working to keep him behind bars for life, according to court arguments and filings in the case. Moore, 45, told people he had taken steps to carry out the plan, which he hoped would scare off witnesses, according to court documents. He even knew that one of the prosecutors was pregnant and threatened to send an associate to the hospital when she gave birth, Assistant State's Attorney LaRai Everett said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
The Baltimore County state's attorney's office will determine whether to pursue charges against a Lansdowne man in the death of a 16-month-old girl who was left in a hot truck for four hours Friday. The medical examiner's office ruled that Sybriya Towels' death was accidental and gave the cause as hyperthermia, the medical term for excessively high body temperatures. Police have not identified the male relative involved in the case but said he failed to drop the girl off at day care and left her in his truck.
NEWS
By Justin George and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Baltimore police officer Robert W. Mitchell faces a second-degree assault charge after police and prosecutors accused him of overstepping his powers and beating a young man more than a year ago. The Baltimore state's attorney's office also charged Mitchell on Friday with two counts of misconduct in office. Prosecutors allege that Mitchell beat Baltimore resident Tiyon Williams in the 1000 block of N. Mount St. on May 19, 2012. "The allegations against Mr. Mitchell are reprehensible," Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said in a statement, "and I promise we will continue to aggressively target those who sacrilege the good men and women of this department and the sacred privilege of serving our community.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Marilyn J. Mosby, a former Baltimore assistant state's attorney and the wife of City Councilman Nick Mosby, told The Sun that she plans to run for Baltimore state's attorney next year. Mosby's confirmation of her intention to run in 2014 came as she alleged that the city prosecutors' office is partly to blame for the alleged corruption scandal unfolding at the city jail involving the Black Guerilla Family gang. Federal prosecutors said last week that an inmate named Tavon White awaiting charges for attempted murder, who has been in the jail since 2009, turned the facility into his own fiefdom, impregnating corrections officers and running a lucrative drug organization.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
A new bill may make more federal money available to protect witnesses in state and local cases around the country, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said Thursday morning. He made the announcement in Baltimore, where witness intimidation has been a persistent problem. This week, a federal jury is hearing testimony about the murder of Carl Stanley Lackl, who was killed before he testified in a homicide case. Retaliation against witnesses has escalated to the point where "it basically can destroy your criminal justice system," Cummings said.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | February 21, 2008
Federal and local law enforcement officers continued yesterday to praise a program they say has helped rid the streets of some of the city's most violent criminals. Nearly 200 Baltimore defendants were charged last year with federal crimes through Baltimore Exile, an initiative designed to combat illegal gun possession, according to statistics released yesterday by the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. Federal prosecutors charged about 30 percent more people with firearms-related crimes last year than in 2006.
NEWS
June 23, 2012
As a concerned Baltimore City school teacher, I was caught up in the City Council's deliberations regarding the bottle tax ("Bottle tax rise gains in council," June 12). I was imagining a classroom with beautiful, vibrant colors and large clear windows that allowed natural light to pass through. I thought of clean scents of newness and possibilities. I thought of how I could help my students understand that our school is an example of what is possible through hard work and perseverance.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
A Baltimore County man suffered a "diabetic attack," causing him to act abnormally when police tried to restrain him and then pepper sprayed and Tasered him, resulting in his death, according to a multimillion-dollar lawsuit brought by his wife against county and state police. Linda Johnson says her husband, Carl D'Andre Johnson, who died shortly after he fought with officers two years ago, "would experience an episode of low blood sugar [and] he would have some difficulty, sometimes acting erratically, and would react negatively to being touched," in a suit filed in Baltimore County Circuit Court last month.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.