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NEWS
February 8, 1996
SUDDENLY, MOMENTUM has shifted in the War of the Stadiums. What's missing is a legislative consensus on specific changes. But key lawmakers are moving to find common ground.Sen. John A. Cade wants a 10 percent tax on personal seat licenses at the Baltimore football stadium. This would raise $8 million, enough to eliminate all taxpayer funds from the Baltimore project from this year's budget. An extra $16 million in lottery money would still be needed later as seed money until the stadium opens and generates revenue.
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NEWS
October 15, 2013
It would be valuable if the city constructed benches around Baltimore's stadiums and along the walkways to the parking lots serving them so that people with disabilities could walk to their cars and occasionally take a short rest en route. Some of the lots are half a mile or more from their stadium. This discourages many people and deprives fans of the ability to attend these venues. It is not too late to do the right thing. Terren M. Himelfarb, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1996
Ending months of contentious debate over the cost of returning professional football to Maryland, the House of Delegates voted yesterday to approve state funding for stadiums in Baltimore and Prince George's County.House passage of the state's $14.5 billion budget, which included $270 million in stadium spending, guaranteed legislative approval of the projects and hands a major victory to Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who had made them his top priority for the General Assembly session."Responsible members of the House ignored the political rhetoric which has characterized much of the debate on this issue and voted their conscience based on what is good for the entire state," Mr. Glendening said.
NEWS
September 19, 2012
Kudos to Monica Barlow for her courage and willingness to get involved in fighting lung cancer ("Camden Yards event looks to brush back lung cancer," Sept. 16). Nice to see a good cause get more recognition. Ironically, smoking is still allowed in designated areas at Oriole Park and Ravens Stadium. Shame on the Orioles and the Maryland Stadium Authority for this. The state of Maryland has been opposed to tobacco use for a long time and takes hard stances in the fight against smoking.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 4, 1996
THE STADIUM DEAL in Annapolis is in deep trouble.Gov. Parris Glendening fumbled the ball on this one. Now he's got to find a way to pick up the loose ball, reverse field, outmaneuver the opposition and streak for the end zone.Basically, Mr. Glendening got greedy. Not only did he snatch the Browns from Cleveland for Baltimore, but then he decided to go all-out for his home county of Prince George's by cutting a very sweet deal with the Redskins to build a new stadium in Landover.One stadium he might be able to justify.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | October 3, 1993
50 Years Ago* Fourteen companies of midshipmen accompanied the football team to Baltimore aboard the steamer Bay Belle for a night game at the Baltimore Stadium. Navy defeated Cornell, 46-7. -- The Sun, Oct. 2, 1943.* Anne Arundel County led the state in the number of pieces of game killed by hunters last year. -- The Sun, Oct. 9, 1943.* Mrs. William V. McCready, wife of the Annapolis mayor, will sponsor the U.S.S. Annapolis, a 303-foot frigate, tomorrow when the warship is launched at the Lorain, Ohio yards of the American Shipbuilding Company.
NEWS
March 10, 1996
LIKE A WELL-DRILLED football team, the coalition backing a football stadium for Baltimore's Camden Yards is marching steadily toward the goal line. This momentum is even pulling along a troubled companion deal -- a stadium in Landover for the Washington-area Redskins.Yet just as in football, there's no sure win in the General Assembly. Key votes in the Senate budget panel have been encouraging. Angry rhetoric this week will flow on the Senate floor from opponents. Sentiment, though, is swinging the other way: Lawmakers are recognizing the considerable economic, social and psychological benefits of these projects.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | June 13, 1993
From The Sun June 13-19, 1843* June 13: By the politeness of the host of the Monument House, we have been enabled to test the quality of some pickled shad, caught at the mouth of the Susquehanna River, and put up at Carpenter's Point, by Mr. George H. Dutton, of Pratt Street.*June 19: A gentleman and lady in a carriage, well nigh met with a very serious accident on Saturday morning last in coming out of the grounds of the Green Mount Cemetery. The horse in descending the hill to the gate took fright and --ed forward at his utmost speed.
NEWS
March 22, 1996
IN THE END, it wasn't even close. Stronger than expected support for a Baltimore football stadium at Camden Yards made yesterday's House of Delegates vote anticlimactic. The coalition held together for a second football stadium in suburban Washington for the Redskins, too. It was a two-touchdown day in Annapolis.While the end result was easier than expected, getting there proved an arduous struggle. At first, Gov. Parris Glendening found himself championing a cause without an army at his side.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
Al Lerner, the longtime partner of Ravens owner Art Modell who was closely involved in Baltimore's NFL effort during the past decade, might soon sell his stake in the team.The two men had a falling out after the team moved to Baltimore, but acquaintances say they are now on better terms. Nonetheless, the Cleveland-based Lerner, who has expressed an interest in owning an expansion team should one be awarded to Cleveland, is negotiating a sale of his shares to the Modell family."We are having discussions that hopefully will lead to a friendly parting of the ways," Modell said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Twice in the past year, Baltimore has become a soccercentric city. It happened last summer, for a day, when two of the world's best teams, AC Milan and Chelsea, came to M&T Bank Stadium, bringing more than 72,000 fans with them. It happened recently, during the monthlong World Cup, when fans of the game piled into bars and crowded near the harbor to watch the U.S. team's run to the knockout round. But could it happen on a more regular basis? City officials, developers and local soccer aficionados believe it can, if plans move forward for a soccer-only stadium and if Baltimore is successful in attracting D.C. United away from Washington.
SPORTS
By Kevin VanValkenburg and kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
The Maryland Stadium Authority voted Tuesday to approve a $100,000 feasibility study to examine the financial viability of building a soccer stadium that could be used to lure a Major League Soccer franchise. The study, after a lengthy negotiation between the city and the Maryland Stadium Authority, will be paid for entirely by the city of Baltimore. In September 2009, Mayor Sheila Dixon wrote a letter to the Maryland Stadium Authority asking that it consider a 42-acre waterfront Westport project as a potential site for a soccer complex that could hold between 17,000 and 20,000 people and be used to lure D.C. United into making Baltimore its permanent home.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2004
On the hallowed turf where Johnny Unitas passed his way into the Hall of Fame and the Orioles played their way into the World Series, where a future governor watched baseball with his dad and a mayor-to-be courted his future wife, a crowd gathered yesterday to witness what they called the new Miracle on 33rd Street. City and state officials and leaders of nonprofit, religious and community groups came together to dedicate the first pieces of Stadium Place, a $50 million development with senior housing and a YMCA on the site of the old Memorial Stadium.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2002
Terrorist attacks on stadiums - such as ones being simulated by local authorities today in Baltimore - aren't merely figments of Hollywood's collective imagination. Intelligence findings, including one circulated to law enforcement agencies 11 days ago, suggest that extremists may view sports facilities as tempting targets that offer a powerful combination of publicity and mass casualties. Though there has been no indication that Baltimore's stadiums are at any particular risk, the Ravens, Air Force and University of Maryland Medical Center will conduct a number of drills with local police and fire personnel today to prepare for just such a disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff | August 13, 2000
Years from now, when the lifetime-achievement Oscar is announced, this summer may be remembered as the turning point in the acting career of PSINet Stadium. Its evocative performance in the new Warner Bros. film "The Replacements," which opened Friday, is nothing short of a breakthrough. We see PSINet grow from an awkwardly named oval where the Jacksonville Jaguars come to humiliate Baltimore each year to a mythical structure that can nurture dreams and fulfill hopes. Through the magic of special effects, the stadium appears, by the end of the movie, to be a place where exciting football is played.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1999
As the annual Army-Navy football classic gets under way today at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, some 70,000 fans will witness the 100th clash of the midshipmen from Annapolis and the West Point cadets.Next year, the excitement will be in Baltimore, when the two teams take to the gridiron at PSINet Stadium. It will be the first time that the game will be played locally since 1944.That year, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered that the game be moved to Baltimore's Municipal Stadium on 33rd Street from the West Point and Annapolis campuses.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Robert Guy Matthews contributed to this article | March 5, 1996
In the first key votes on the legislature's most contentious issue, Senate budget panels endorsed yesterday spending about $270 million on football stadium projects in Baltimore and Prince George's County.By a vote of 8-to-5, the Budget and Taxation Committee rejected proposals to strip out some of the $200 million for the Baltimore project and dedicate it to school construction.The committee's action, led by a coalition of lawmakers from the Baltimore area and Prince George's County, clears the way for a vote by the full Senate sometime next week.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1999
As the annual Army-Navy football classic gets under way today at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, some 70,000 fans will witness the 100th clash of the midshipmen from Annapolis and the West Point cadets.Next year, the excitement will be in Baltimore, when the two teams take to the gridiron at PSINet Stadium. It will be the first time that the game will be played locally since 1944.That year, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered that the game be moved to Baltimore's Municipal Stadium on 33rd Street from the West Point and Annapolis campuses.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Paul McMullen and Jon Morgan and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Christian Ewell and Bill Free contributed to this article | September 7, 1998
With equal parts celebration and defiance, a sellout crowd of Baltimore's football faithful yesterday consecrated the Ravens' new, downtown home -- a red brick stadium some thought would never get built for a team some thought would never play here."
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
Al Lerner, the longtime partner of Ravens owner Art Modell who was closely involved in Baltimore's NFL effort during the past decade, might soon sell his stake in the team.The two men had a falling out after the team moved to Baltimore, but acquaintances say they are now on better terms. Nonetheless, the Cleveland-based Lerner, who has expressed an interest in owning an expansion team should one be awarded to Cleveland, is negotiating a sale of his shares to the Modell family."We are having discussions that hopefully will lead to a friendly parting of the ways," Modell said yesterday.
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