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NEWS
March 26, 1998
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly quoted Tyson Tildon, president of the Baltimore school board, on the board's plans for possible cuts in the budgets of City College and the School for the Arts.In fact, Tildon said there are no plans to cut $2.2 million from the budgets of those two schools in the next fiscal year, which begins July 1.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 3/26/98
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | October 7, 2014
The head of the Baltimore County school administrators union said the majority of misconduct cases against administrators can "be resolved more expeditiously. " Speaking at the county school board meeting on Tuesday night, William Lawrence, executive director of the Council of Administrative and Supervisory Employees, suggested that the union and the county work together on resolving cases more quickly. Currently, administrators and teachers can spend weeks and months investigating a teacher for misconduct, sometimes while they sit in a warehouse.
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NEWS
September 13, 1998
"Is it safe to say our kids could almost stay home and do as well?"-- Baltimore school board member Patricia Morris, commenting on the overall poor showing of city elementary students on tests measuring their progress in reading and math in the last school year."The numbers show that Baltimore City [students], like [those in] other urban systems, are not doing well compared to their peers. They reflect the problems kids bring to school."--Steven Ferrara, former director of testing for the state Department of Education, explaining the same low test scores.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
State Del. Pat McDonough has asked the Maryland State Prosecutor's Office to investigate whether the Baltimore County school board acted properly when it gave the superintendent an increase in his pay and benefits package of $27,000. McDonough believes Superintendent Dallas Dance's contract prohibits the board from giving the superintendent an increase in compensation that is larger than the teachers'. The board gave Dance a $5,000 raise as well as a $18,200 reimbursement for his contribution into the Maryland state retirement system and a larger payout for unused vacation days.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | June 13, 2007
The Baltimore school board voted unanimously last night to pass a waiver allowing 1,400 sophomores to move on to their junior year even though they didn't take a mandated math course. The board requires high school sophomores to take and pass geometry to be promoted to 11th grade. But the 1,400 students instead spent this year taking an Algebra 1 review course, after failing the state algebra exam that they must pass to graduate. Diplomas City gets low mark for graduation rate. pg 3B
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
The Baltimore school board recently named its interim chief financial officer to the post permanently, but he has not decided whether to continue in the job because of a family tragedy. John Walker had been filling in as chief financial officer since November, when Rose Piedmont left. Previously, he was an independent contractor with the schools finance office. On May 26, the same week as Walker's appointment, his 23-year-old son, Patrick John Walker, was killed in an apparent road-rage incident in Bel Air. Police say he was stabbed in the neck by another motorist who thought the younger Walker had cut him off in traffic.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
Baltimore : Federal court Man gets 11 1/2 years on gun conviction A 35-year-old Baltimore man labeled an "armed career criminal" has received a 11 1/2 -year prison sentence in federal court for being a felon in possession of a gun. U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles sentenced Antonio Johnson on Friday to prison, followed by five years of supervised release. According to Johnson's guilty plea, a Baltimore police officer saw him in the 500 block of W. Preston St., an area known as an open-air drug market, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1997
"We've got no contract. We get no respect. We've got lots of work, so what do we get? Santa Claus ain't coming to town!"The round man with the red suit and white beard giggled as he sang the words, to the tune of "Santa Claus is Coming to Town." But his Christmas message wasn't supposed to be funny.It was a poorly sung missive from city teachers, apparently angry with the Baltimore school board and Robert E. Schiller, the interim schools chief, over stalled contract talks.The singing Santa crashed the board's Christmas party at school headquarters last night to deliver his lyrical message, much to the surprise of board members, administrators and staff members who were merrily consuming appetizers and punch (nonalcoholic, of course)
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff Writer | October 15, 1993
Over the objections of about 100 opponents, the Baltimore school board endorsed last night the city's plan to let individual schools decide whether to offer Norplant.Reading a statement, President Phillip H. Farfel said the board supports school-based health clinics, where the contraceptive is to be offered, and the "activities and programs of these clinics." Dr. Farfell urged Norplant opponents to take questions or concerns to the Baltimore Health Department.The board's support is symbolic, since the clinics, though housed in schools, are operated by the Health Department.
NEWS
By From staff reports | April 11, 1998
Prince George's gets go-ahead to create needle-exchange 0) planPrince George's County won permission from the General Assembly yesterday to create a program to distribute clean needles to drug addicts.The county, which has the second-highest AIDS rate among Maryland jurisdictions, has been considering following Baltimore in setting up a needle-exchange program. Baltimore's program has been credited with significantly slowing the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome by letting addicts trade dirty needles for clean ones.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
City school officials facing a $31 million budget shortfall next year have proposed dipping into the system's rainy day fund to close the gap. But that's not what those dollars are supposed to be for. The whole point of setting aside emergency funds is to cushion the impact of major unanticipated disruptions, from natural disasters to sudden economic crises. They're not a backstop for the kind of foreseeable, year-to-year budgetary ups and downs that ought to be part of the routine planning process, and using them that way would set a terrible precedent for the future.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
Baltimore County voters would have the long-sought opportunity to vote for some members of their school board starting in 2018 under legislation passed Friday by the General Assembly. The House voted unanimously to send the bill to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who has not said whether he would sign it. The measure represents a compromise between County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and the county's General Assembly delegations. It would create a hybrid board made up of seven elected and four appointed members, along with one student member.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Baltimore County school board voted Tuesday night to approve one of its largest contracts in recent years, an ambitious $205 million plan to supply laptop computers to the system's 150,000 students and teachers over the next seven years. The school system will lease HP EliteBook Revolves, the centerpiece of Superintendent Dallas Dance's initiative to put a laptop in the hands of every student in the next several years. Dance said the school system will pay for the computers in part with savings from centralizing the purchase and operation of printers, copiers and other technology, and by evaluating whether central office employees who leave the school system should be replaced.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | December 19, 2013
Baltimore school officials may have to cut the city government a $2.9 million check after the school system provided inflated enrollment numbers for the city's payment to the district last year. According to city officials, the school district reported that 79,849 students were to be funded in the city's annual per-pupil contribution to schools, known as the maintenance of effort, when the number should have been 78,871. The 978-pupil discrepancy, which threw off the per-pupil expenditure by $30 per-student, could have cost the city millions, officials said.
NEWS
October 18, 2012
I was a teacher-mentor in the Baltimore City schools years ago when the city went $57 million in debt and we were all fired ("Schools audit draws concern," Oct. 9). I remember thinking at the time that the school board must have been sleeping not to have noticed the discrepancies in funding. Well, what do you know: The new school board has the same problem. Why do they accept what they are told? Isn't it their job to see through the spin to oversee what is going on in the system and make sure the job is being done?
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
The Baltimore County school board voted unanimously Tuesday night to approve S. Dallas Dance, a Houston school administrator, as the next superintendent of its 105,000-student system. During a brief news conference after the vote, Dance said he had had "frank and honest" meetings Tuesday with elected leaders, including legislators in Annapolis, the County Council and the county executive. Because the school board held a closed search, Tuesday was the first time Dance was in town and available to meet the public.
NEWS
October 4, 1991
Virginia Barrett Sherwood, former president of the board of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died Tuesday of a heart ailment at her home on Devon Hill Road. She was 81.A memorial service for Mrs. Sherwood was being held today at Grace United Methodist Church, 5407 N. Charles St.She headed the board at GBMC in the 1970s and had been a member since the hospital was established, having served on the board of a predecessor, the Hospital for the Women of Maryland.She helped establish the Greater Baltimore Medical Center Foundation, a fund-raising group, and had been a volunteer in the hospital gift shop.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
The president of the Baltimore school board said yesterday a proposal to eliminate the city's seven elementary-middle schools appears to be dead.In a statement released by the school system's central office, Dr. Phillip Farfel, the board president, said that "judging by the reaction of several board members so far, it appears unlikely the proposal to split the city's seven combined elementary-middle schools . . . would be accepted by the board."On Monday, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said he was against the proposal and preferred to see more schools with the K-8 structure.
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