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NEWS
March 31, 2011
We were very pleased to read about the Baltimore City Public Schools' well-deserved national recognition as "revitalized" and on "an upward trajectory" in "Baltimore's graduation rate: a success story still being written" (March 28). As the article makes clear, the Baltimore City Public Schools, under the leadership of CEO Andrés Alonso, have gone to extraordinary lengths to improve the quality of education, increase graduation rates, reduce expulsions and suspensions and develop robust partnerships with foundations, community organizations and other stakeholders.
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FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Aya Dixon, 15, has dreams of working for a top design house before eventually branching off to create her own line of couture. Up until now, her only brush with that industry was thumbing through glossy magazines or watching reality shows on television. That changed Wednesday when the Baltimore Design School sophomore got a chance to mingle with the likes of Anna Wintour, popular designer and "Project Runway" judge Zac Posen and other big names in the fashion industry. Dixon was part of a group of 10 students from Baltimore Design School who attended the White House's first Fashion Education Workshop, led by first lady Michelle Obama.
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FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1996
Before gangsta raps there were raps about libraries and teen-age pregnancy; before Dannemora State Prison and the killing bullets, there were pillow fights and the exuberance of youth.Tupac Amaru Shakur did not grow up in Baltimore. He was not a finished product when he left. But his years here encompassed that crucial time when childhood ends and self-discovery begins.He was 14 when he and his mother moved here from the Bronx in 1985. He called himself MC New York and won a rap contest sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Daniel W. Hubers, a retired real estate broker who was also a competitive sailor, died Saturday at Franklin Square Medical Center of heart failure. The lifelong Middle River resident was 96. The son of Anton Hubers, an optometrist, and Anna Hubers, a homemaker, Daniel Weber Hubers was born and raised on Weber Avenue in Essex. He was a 1936 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended what is now Loyola University Maryland, where he was a pre-med student. Mr. Hubers graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law but never took the Maryland bar examination.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker | February 29, 2012
A newly renovated health center at Tench Tilghman Elementary and Middle School in Baltimore has reopened to students and will include a doctor onsite once a week The health st uite will
NEWS
May 27, 2014
The recent commentary regarding the Baltimore School for the Arts and the experience of Jabril Leach who was dismissed from the school, has some validity ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). No, the school is not equipped to deal with the Jabrils of Baltimore, but at the Baltimore School for the Arts, you will find teachers and administrators willing to meet you halfway. As a student coming from the city's hood, I needed teachers who would go beyond the call of duty (Stephanie Powell and R.C. Gladney to name two)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Every principal can use an extra set of hands, but Mary Donnelly of Baltimore's John Ruhrah Elementary/Middle School never imagined she'd have 80. School leaders from across the country took to the Southeast Baltimore school's yard Wednesday, building a new playground to replace one whose missing pieces and decrepit structure had become a safety hazard. "I'm overwhelmed — but in a good way," said Donnelly, who has led the school for 12 years. "This is a gathering place for our community, and I'm a firm believer in kids getting outside.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 20, 2012
Updated: Baltimore City police sent out a release around 2:30 p.m. informing that Guadalupe Sosa and Michael Carter, the two Baltimore School for the Arts students who went missing Wednesday, have been found safe and unharmed.    Original Post: Baltimore school officials are spreading word that two students from the Baltimore School for the Arts left the school Wednesday morning, and to date have not been seen or heard from...
NEWS
May 24, 2014
I am a junior dancer at Baltimore School for the Arts, and I did not appreciate the way op-ed writer Patricia Schultheis portrayed my school because she do not have proper knowledge of what BSA is ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). My mother also attended this school, and during her years, a homeless boy attended. He kept it hidden from them, but once they found out, they did everything in their power to help him, and now he is very successful. My best friend is also struggling.
NEWS
October 18, 2012
I was a teacher-mentor in the Baltimore City schools years ago when the city went $57 million in debt and we were all fired ("Schools audit draws concern," Oct. 9). I remember thinking at the time that the school board must have been sleeping not to have noticed the discrepancies in funding. Well, what do you know: The new school board has the same problem. Why do they accept what they are told? Isn't it their job to see through the spin to oversee what is going on in the system and make sure the job is being done?
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | October 7, 2014
The head of the Baltimore County school administrators union said the majority of misconduct cases against administrators can "be resolved more expeditiously. " Speaking at the county school board meeting on Tuesday night, William Lawrence, executive director of the Council of Administrative and Supervisory Employees, suggested that the union and the county work together on resolving cases more quickly. Currently, administrators and teachers can spend weeks and months investigating a teacher for misconduct, sometimes while they sit in a warehouse.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Two schools in Baltimore County went on alert for an hour Friday morning after police said a man was shot in a nearby block. Officers went to the first block of Eiffel Court in Essex to investigate the shooting at 10:45 a.m. Friday, Baltimore County Police said. They found a man who had been shot at least once, prompting Deep Creek Middle School and Deep Creek Elementary School to issue an alert, meaning they restricted access to their campuses and had staff monitoring entrances and exits.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Vincent J. Salkoski, who taught mathematics in Baltimore public schools and was a World War II veteran, died Sept. 3 of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. Vincent Joseph Salkoski was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay, where he was a member of the Curtis Bay Athletic Club. After graduating from Southern High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served as a rifleman and mortarman. He participated in the occupation of China. After being discharged in 1946, he took courses at City College and the Johns Hopkins University to receive his teaching certification.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | September 11, 2014
Getting their children into the Patapsco High School for the Arts, a magnet school in Baltimore County, was a dream come true, some Randallstown parents said. But then came the reality. From the northwest corner of the county to the school near Dundalk, the journey can take their children as much as two and a half hours one way on public transportation. And that, parents say, is unacceptable. A group of parents went to the school board this week requesting that there be a bus stop somewhere in the northwest area to take the 42 children who live there to the magnet school.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley and his wife, Katie, are actively house shopping in northern Baltimore and plan to "repatria te " to the city when his term ends. O'Malley said Thursday his youngest son has already switched to a Baltimore school and that the family intends to move to a home near his wife's parents and other family once they leave Annapolis early next year. The house search in Baltimore comes as the two-term Democrat  weighs his future beyond the Sta te House, including a possible bid for the Whi te House in 2016.
NEWS
By Francois Furstenberg | September 9, 2014
On behalf of Baltimore's stakeholders, I want to express my thanks to Gregory E. Thornton, the new chief executive officer of Baltimore City Public Schools, for his inspiring words (" Much work to be done ," Aug. 25). In case you're wondering, the stake I hold is a house I recently bought in East Baltimore. It's a big row house, built in 1875, so I don't exactly hold it - really it holds me - but I guess that part isn't so important. Let me get to the point: CEO Thornton tells us he will run the city schools like a business.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Helena E. Sawyer Roberts Wright, a retired city elementary school teacher and principal who was an active member of Heritage United Church of Christ, died Aug. 18 at her Lochearn home of complications from heart disease. She was 93. "She was a pillar of Baltimore education and society," said Latrell A. Clark, an educator who had attended Hilton Elementary School from 1977 to 1983 when Mrs. Wright was its principal. "She made learning fun and made you want to come to school. " The daughter of John Sawyer and Clara Doyle Sawyer, who owned and operated a boarding house, the former Helena Elizabeth Sawyer was born in Norfolk, Va., and moved in 1929 to Lexington Street in West Baltimore.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
In his commentary, "The Civil Right Act at 50" (Aug. 31), Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori writes that "...our Catholic schools in Baltimore City educate majority non-Catholic, African-American students whose education is heavily subsidized by the Church's private partners seeking to improve lives (and communities) through education. " It seems to me a bit hypocritical for Archbishop Lori to support these commitments when a few years ago, the archdiocese closed so many Catholic schools in Baltimore City where most of the students needed to have the influence of those schools to improve their lives.
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