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By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1994
The future of Maryland's transportation network -- from roads to airports, from bus and rail systems to Baltimore's port -- hinges on a two-word question:Who pays?As the cost of running the state's public transit systems continues to escalate, state officials say the current reliance on taxing gasoline to pay for all forms of transportation may have to change.Without action, the long-term threat is that highway congestion will one day outstrip the state's ability to build and improve roads or expand transit systems.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | March 16, 2008
Baltimore's Port Discovery children's museum will turn 10 in December, which is older than most of the kids who come through its doors, and it has launched a year of festivities to celebrate the milestone. Museum leaders recently unveiled the first new permanent exhibit since the building opened -- a $400,000 aquatic playground called Wonders of Water. They've also scheduled a series of programs and events called Ten for Ten to mark the anniversary and give visitors different experiences throughout the year.
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NEWS
November 19, 1990
This is a time of great anticipation for the Port of Baltimore. A state-of-the-art marine terminal recently opened, promising major cost-savings for large shippers. Modernization plans for other port terminals are under way. Business and labor leaders are exhibiting a determined, cooperative attitude. These are signs of substantial progress in restoring Baltimore to maritime prominence.And yet, there is apprehension on the docks. No one is sure if the new Seagirt Marine Terminal will, indeed, lure big-time customers to Baltimore.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
Until last week, the fact that a foreign company, Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co., manages the loading and unloading of cargo in Baltimore and five other U.S. ports didn't seem particularly noteworthy. But the impending takeover of the London-based company by Dubai Ports World has changed all that. Because DPW is owned by the United Arab Emirates, a country that was used as a staging point for the 9/11 hijackers, the potential security ramifications have suddenly become a hot issue.
NEWS
November 26, 1999
Port editorials point to need policy directions The Sun's recent editorials on the port of Baltimore gave an objective overview of the port's potential and highlighted the need to keep Baltimore's channels open at depths that will accommodate modern shipping ("The world is knocking at Baltimore's door," Nov. 15 and "Dredge or die for Baltimore's port," Nov. 16). The Sun's discussion of dredge dumping should give political leaders food for thought on the adoption of the 1996 dumping plan, which includes carefully monitored open water disposal sites -- and the recognition that, in the long term, new sites and disposal methods will be needed.
NEWS
May 14, 1999
BALTIMORE had the best offer on the table -- by far. But when it came time for a decision, it was the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey that secured a 30-year contract for a container terminal that could ultimately handle $10 billion a year in maritime cargo.It should not have come as a surprise. The deck was stacked against Baltimore by CSX Corp., which owns a half-interest in the Maersk/Sea-Land Services steamship combine that was seeking a hub terminal capable of handling the next generation of container ships.
NEWS
December 30, 1995
IN THE HOTLY competitive world of maritime trade, Baltimore's port rivals in Philadelphia and Norfolk have gained a key advantage in the battle for cargo business. Both of those ports can ship container cargo inland on larger double-stacked railroad flat cars; Baltimore can't. Its railroad tunnels leading to the port are too low.That's becoming a distinct disadvantage. Without higher tunnels, the Port of Baltimore is going to lose cargo in the years ahead as steamship lines increasingly shift to the bigger container boxes to reduce expenses in their cutthroat industry.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | August 12, 1993
In a move that could ensure further stability for the port of Baltimore, the president of the International Longshoremen's Association said yesterday that the union would likely seek a one- or two-year extension to its contract rather than renegotiate."
NEWS
May 11, 1997
BALTIMORE'S PORT could benefit handsomely from the accord worked out between CSX Corp. and Norfolk Southern Corp. to split up Conrail, the dominant railroad in the Northeast. Not only does Baltimore get a second Class I carrier (Norfolk Southern) with a reputation for aggressive pursuit of new business, but the city will see the two remaining East Coast rail behemoths compete head-to-head for port cargo.Both CSX and Norfolk Southern are paying top dollar for their respective shares of Conrail: For $4.3 billion, CSX will gain most of the former New York Central lines in the Northeast and Midwest; Norfolk Southern will pay $5.9 billion to take over the old Pennsylvania Railroad lines, including tracks in Maryland.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | October 15, 1993
SCRIMMAGE AT SEA:International-class sailors will try to tack their way to victory this weekend in a scrimmage on the bay. Skippers attempt to outmaneuver their opponents at the Columbus Cup team racing finals at 11 a.m. today and tomorrow. (Fans may watch the races from their own boats but are cautioned to stay clear of the course). About 3 p.m. today, go to the docks of the HarborView Marina and Yacht Club, 1225 Key Highway, for a recap of events with ESPN commentator Gary Jobson. After the racing both days, fans are invited to HarborView to mingle with the skippers and crews.
NEWS
November 26, 1999
Port editorials point to need policy directions The Sun's recent editorials on the port of Baltimore gave an objective overview of the port's potential and highlighted the need to keep Baltimore's channels open at depths that will accommodate modern shipping ("The world is knocking at Baltimore's door," Nov. 15 and "Dredge or die for Baltimore's port," Nov. 16). The Sun's discussion of dredge dumping should give political leaders food for thought on the adoption of the 1996 dumping plan, which includes carefully monitored open water disposal sites -- and the recognition that, in the long term, new sites and disposal methods will be needed.
NEWS
May 14, 1999
BALTIMORE had the best offer on the table -- by far. But when it came time for a decision, it was the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey that secured a 30-year contract for a container terminal that could ultimately handle $10 billion a year in maritime cargo.It should not have come as a surprise. The deck was stacked against Baltimore by CSX Corp., which owns a half-interest in the Maersk/Sea-Land Services steamship combine that was seeking a hub terminal capable of handling the next generation of container ships.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
Hidden deep below the surface of the Chesapeake Bay and the Patapsco River, stretching from Annapolis to Fort McHenry, is an underwater highway for the world's largest ships. It is 50 feet deep, 700 feet wide and 25 miles long, 7carved like a giant trough into the soft ;bottom of mud, sand and clay.People in the shipping business say that channel is a big reason the port of Baltimore survives. While the evolving demands of the maritime trade have left much of the port outdated and empty, Baltimore's channels are as deep and roomy as nearly any on the East Coast today.
NEWS
February 26, 1999
IN Maryland's uphill battle to win a huge shipping contract from the Maersk/Sea-Land consortium, a key sticking point has become the position of CSX Transportation, the city's major rail carrier.It appears the railroad has nothing to gain and everything to lose if Baltimore becomes the consortium's new port of call.Here's the rub: The railroad's parent company, CSX, also owns Sea-Land. The conflicting interests of CSX's rail and shipping lines could deny the Port of Baltimore any chance to win this bidding war.Establishing a hub in Baltimore makes enormous sense for Maersk/Sea-Land.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
In a port city that many of the world's largest steamship lines have abandoned, the arrival of China Ocean Shipping Co. four years ago was like a transfusion of fresh blood. As other container ships left Baltimore, "Cosco" sailed in. As lines reduced service, Cosco expanded."They're definitely one of our top carriers," said Mark Johnson, the Maryland Port Administration's deputy marketing director. "We're very happy they're here.But not all of America is so bullish on Cosco these days.Washington policy-makers consider the company a threat to market capitalism and national security.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1998
A new vessel-sharing agreement among three shipping companies means the port of Baltimore has lost another container line. Crowley American Transport of Jacksonville, Fla., said it will no longer make its weekly Baltimore call.Crowley, a subsidiary of Crowley Maritime Corp. in Oakland, Calif., had brought 6,000 containers to Baltimore annually. It will keep its 10-person office here and use the port as an alternate site.The operating agreement teams up Crowley with Oakland's APL Ltd. and Ivaran Lines of Norway, which already has established port operations in Philadelphia and Norfolk, Va., said Crowley spokesman Mark Miller.
NEWS
November 9, 1991
The Port of Baltimore has had its share of blows over the past few years but now the momentum is swinging the other way, with Baltimore on the offensive. Maersk Line, the port's most important customer, gave Baltimore a huge vote of confidence this week when it signed a 10-year lease to continue doing business here. The port's long-term strategy seems to be working.Key to the port's success is the state of the art Seagirt Marine Terminal. Already, one of the world's largest steamship companies, Orient Overseas Container Line, has decided to return to Baltimore to take advantage of Seagirt's ultra-modern facilities speeding cargo handling.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
Until last week, the fact that a foreign company, Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co., manages the loading and unloading of cargo in Baltimore and five other U.S. ports didn't seem particularly noteworthy. But the impending takeover of the London-based company by Dubai Ports World has changed all that. Because DPW is owned by the United Arab Emirates, a country that was used as a staging point for the 9/11 hijackers, the potential security ramifications have suddenly become a hot issue.
NEWS
May 11, 1997
BALTIMORE'S PORT could benefit handsomely from the accord worked out between CSX Corp. and Norfolk Southern Corp. to split up Conrail, the dominant railroad in the Northeast. Not only does Baltimore get a second Class I carrier (Norfolk Southern) with a reputation for aggressive pursuit of new business, but the city will see the two remaining East Coast rail behemoths compete head-to-head for port cargo.Both CSX and Norfolk Southern are paying top dollar for their respective shares of Conrail: For $4.3 billion, CSX will gain most of the former New York Central lines in the Northeast and Midwest; Norfolk Southern will pay $5.9 billion to take over the old Pennsylvania Railroad lines, including tracks in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening and a few deputies are in Taiwan en route to South Korea for his second international trade trip, focusing on building business for Baltimore's ports and boosting exports to the Far East."
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