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By Roger Twigg and James Bock and Roger Twigg and James Bock,Staff Writer Staff writer Michael Fletcher contributed to this article | August 5, 1993
Edward V. Woods announced his retirement as Baltimore's police commissioner yesterday, bringing to a close a four-year tenure marked by a soaring city murder rate and capped by fresh allegations of police corruption.The embattled 56-year-old police chief left yesterday on a two-week vacation and could not be reached for comment. He canceled a scheduled appearance at an East Baltimore anti-crime rally at the last minute Tuesday night.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that he did not force the commissioner out. But he added that he didn't try to discourage the 33-year department veteran from retiring.
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NEWS
May 24, 2009
When Baltimore police roll into city neighborhoods known for serious drug violence, the first thing they often hear are shouts of "Five-O! Five-O!" from lookouts warning of their approach. The lookouts, mostly men in their 40s and 50s who are considered too old to play much of a role in the street-level drug trade, earn a meager subsistence on the periphery of the business. Younger, up-and-coming dealers pay them a pittance to keep watch, usually in the form of just enough heroin or crack cocaine to get them through another day. So when Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III, who came up through the ranks and once walked those mean streets himself, considers how to manage Baltimore's endemic crime problem, he's got to be thinking of those middle-age guys on the street who, broke, unemployed and addicted, are as much victims of the city's violent drug trade as are the junkies who line up in the shadows to buy their daily fix. "The best thing I could possibly do to reduce crime in Baltimore would be to give all my officers two kinds of cards to hand out," the commissioner says.
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NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Del Quentin Wilber and Sarah Koenig and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2001
Baltimore's police union, in a gimmick that employs equal parts sarcasm and frustration, is placing a "wanted" ad to register its dissatisfaction with State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy and solicit candidates to replace her. The Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 3 has bought a one-eighth-page advertisement in The Daily Record and in several community newspapers seeking candidates who have, among other qualities, "a willingness to work with, not...
NEWS
July 23, 2003
Insurance crisis threatens access to health care The Sun's editorial "Doctors, lawyers, bogeymen" (July 13) forecasts doctors winning by a huge margin over lawyers in a popularity contest about honor, compassion and knowledge. Yet it discounts those treasured qualities of doctors when it alleges that the malpractice insurance crisis is about doctors' self-interest and refusal to compromise. Nothing could be further from the truth. Unfortunately, the malpractice insurance crisis is real, and it is about the loss of practicing physicians because of escalating premiums.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2001
Baltimore's police commissioner marked his first year as the city's top law enforcement officer yesterday by claiming success in turning around a department once beset with infighting and struggling to curtail crime. Edward T. Norris -- a career New York officer lured here by a new mayor who put crime-fighting at the top of his political agenda -- listed accomplishments that include fewer homicides and shootings, more murder arrests and a renewed emphasis on rooting out corruption. Police and residents, Mayor Martin O'Malley said at a news conference yesterday, "have made a difference and saved a lot of lives."
NEWS
February 4, 1994
At his confirmation hearing Wednesday night, Baltimore's Police Commissioner-designate Thomas C. Frazier got an earful.City Council President Mary Pat Clarke wanted to get a fixed date by which he would clear open-air drug markets at street corners.Kenneth Lee wanted to know when the police would arrest the killer of his 21-year-old son, a computer science student, who was slain in September.Councilwoman Sheila Dixon wanted to know whether the city's new top cop was "a spiritual person.""Yes," replied Mr. Frazier.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 8, 2001
Board of Estimates OKs $11 million police helicopter contract The Board of Estimates approved yesterday an $11.2 million contract for the purchase and maintenance of four new helicopters, giving the city a police helicopter unit for the first time since a fatal 1998 crash. American Eurocopter Corp. helicopters, which police say could be airborne daily by mid-April, are expected to improve drug enforcement and cut accidents caused by high-speed chases. The EC 120 helicopters, which are to be equipped with surveillance technology, cost $4.9 million, and a 10-year contract for mandatory replacement parts costs $6.3 million.
FEATURES
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 4, 1999
150 years ago in The SunSeptember 4: Yesterday morning the various public schools of our city, after being closed during the usual summer vacation, resumed their duties under the most auspicious prospects. In many of the primary schools the attendance at the precise hour of opening was unusually prompt, and the scholars indicated, by their early appearance, with their books in good order, a strong desire to taste more deeply of the fruits which those very excellent institutions freely bestow upon the rising generation.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
It is midmorning, and Baltimore's police chief is at his desk, scanning a list of items seized in drug raids. He's looking for a lawn mower. And a grill.A scavenger hunt may not fit the image of Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier and his tough stance on violent crime, but for this self-described "social worker with a gun," it's exactly the image he wants to project.Obtaining items for the force's youth choir or a neighborhood cleanup, he says, is crucial to the mission of making Baltimore safer.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1998
Baltimore's police union commended yesterday Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's call for city police to enforce traffic laws more aggressively in an effort to reduce violent crime.Wednesday, Schmoke toured Cleveland, a city similar in size and demographics to Baltimore, to view crime-fighting strategies that officials there said have helped reduce the homicide rate.Although Cleveland and Baltimore use many of the same crime-fighting initiatives, including community policing, Schmoke noted that police in Cleveland write more traffic tickets.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Del Quentin Wilber and Sarah Koenig and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2001
Baltimore's police union, in a gimmick that employs equal parts sarcasm and frustration, is placing a "wanted" ad to register its dissatisfaction with State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy and solicit candidates to replace her. The Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 3 has bought a one-eighth-page advertisement in The Daily Record and in several community newspapers seeking candidates who have, among other qualities, "a willingness to work with, not...
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 11, 2001
In Baltimore City Authorities arrest 178 in drug sting, gather tips on other crimes A police sting operation in West Baltimore, which led to 178 drug arrests, broke up what police said yesterday was a drug organization operating in the same house as a day care center. Eric McMickens, 33, was arrested Saturday and charged with possession with intent to distribute drugs after police reported seeing him take a bag containing 240 pieces of heroin into a house on Penrose Avenue. Detectives raided his residence in the 2000 block of Kentucky Ave. - in a house where a woman runs a day care center.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2001
Baltimore's police commissioner marked his first year as the city's top law enforcement officer yesterday by claiming success in turning around a department once beset with infighting and struggling to curtail crime. Edward T. Norris -- a career New York officer lured here by a new mayor who put crime-fighting at the top of his political agenda -- listed accomplishments that include fewer homicides and shootings, more murder arrests and a renewed emphasis on rooting out corruption. Police and residents, Mayor Martin O'Malley said at a news conference yesterday, "have made a difference and saved a lot of lives."
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 8, 2001
Board of Estimates OKs $11 million police helicopter contract The Board of Estimates approved yesterday an $11.2 million contract for the purchase and maintenance of four new helicopters, giving the city a police helicopter unit for the first time since a fatal 1998 crash. American Eurocopter Corp. helicopters, which police say could be airborne daily by mid-April, are expected to improve drug enforcement and cut accidents caused by high-speed chases. The EC 120 helicopters, which are to be equipped with surveillance technology, cost $4.9 million, and a 10-year contract for mandatory replacement parts costs $6.3 million.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1999
As his secretive search comes down to the wire, Mayor-elect Martin O'Malley has interviewed several candidates for Baltimore's police commissioner, including a nationally known chief from South Carolina.Sources confirm that Reuben M. Greenberg, who runs the 347-member Charleston, S.C., department, has flown to Baltimore and talked with the incoming mayor and members of his transition team.Marilyn Harris-Davis, a top O'Malley aide, declined to confirm or deny any name. "O'Malley has interviewed several people," she said, adding that they include candidates inside and outside the city force.
FEATURES
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 4, 1999
150 years ago in The SunSeptember 4: Yesterday morning the various public schools of our city, after being closed during the usual summer vacation, resumed their duties under the most auspicious prospects. In many of the primary schools the attendance at the precise hour of opening was unusually prompt, and the scholars indicated, by their early appearance, with their books in good order, a strong desire to taste more deeply of the fruits which those very excellent institutions freely bestow upon the rising generation.
NEWS
May 24, 2009
When Baltimore police roll into city neighborhoods known for serious drug violence, the first thing they often hear are shouts of "Five-O! Five-O!" from lookouts warning of their approach. The lookouts, mostly men in their 40s and 50s who are considered too old to play much of a role in the street-level drug trade, earn a meager subsistence on the periphery of the business. Younger, up-and-coming dealers pay them a pittance to keep watch, usually in the form of just enough heroin or crack cocaine to get them through another day. So when Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III, who came up through the ranks and once walked those mean streets himself, considers how to manage Baltimore's endemic crime problem, he's got to be thinking of those middle-age guys on the street who, broke, unemployed and addicted, are as much victims of the city's violent drug trade as are the junkies who line up in the shadows to buy their daily fix. "The best thing I could possibly do to reduce crime in Baltimore would be to give all my officers two kinds of cards to hand out," the commissioner says.
NEWS
December 24, 1997
NOW THE TRUE education begins. The 44 men and women who went through the first 16-week Police Corps training period have been assigned to their respective departments and within weeks will be on the street. Twenty-eight will remain in Baltimore, 16 are headed to Charleston, S.C. Whatever they learned in the classroom will be nothing like the real thing.Some will cut it; some won't. That would be expected of any class of rookie cops. Expectations for this group are higher, however. Each has a college education.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1999
Determined to stamp out drug-related violence in troubled city neighborhoods, police say they plan to continue the kind of sweeps that led to 35 arrests last week in Northwest and East Baltimore.The latest anti-drug effort -- part of Operation Cease Fire -- led to 13 arrests Friday in a Northwest community where a Baptist minister was shot to death two weeks ago., "We're here to tell you that if you employ violence as part of your drug trade, you've just come to the top of our stack," Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier said Friday at a news conference at Northwestern District.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1998
Baltimore's police union commended yesterday Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's call for city police to enforce traffic laws more aggressively in an effort to reduce violent crime.Wednesday, Schmoke toured Cleveland, a city similar in size and demographics to Baltimore, to view crime-fighting strategies that officials there said have helped reduce the homicide rate.Although Cleveland and Baltimore use many of the same crime-fighting initiatives, including community policing, Schmoke noted that police in Cleveland write more traffic tickets.
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