Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaltimore S Inner Harbor
IN THE NEWS

Baltimore S Inner Harbor

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 20, 2011
The folks over at Sun Magazine had a cool feature in their latest issue where 100 Charm City celebrities shared what they love about Baltimore , and a handful of sports figures were among those who chimed in. Cal Ripken Jr. predictably said his favorite thing in Baltimore was Camden Yards. Billy Cundiff likes to grab a bite to eat at Kooper's Tavern in Fells. Domonique Foxworth thinks Harbor East is Baltimore's Inner Harbor for non-tourists. And Jim Palmer's favorite dish is the Veal Saltimbocca at Da Mimmo's.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
The maritime economy hasn't been shipshape in the city that calls itself "America's Sailing Capital. " The doldrums that becalmed the national powerboat and sailboat industry four years ago did not spare Annapolis - or the two boat shows that have tied up in the harbor every October since the 1970s. But this year feels different, local boating experts say. Consumer confidence is returning, and more boaters want to buy a new vessel or trade up to a bigger one. "The challenges have been severe," said Paul Jacobs, general manager of the U.S. Sailboat Show and U.S. Powerboat Show.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | May 31, 1997
THIS IS NOT about the 25-story statue of Columbus, or whomever its Russian sculptor meant to portray, that some would like to see in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.This is about another statue, three stories tall, with a darker Russian connection and a much better chance of being erected, if not in the harbor, a block east of it.Dozens of people have been working for a decade to build the National Katyn Memorial in Baltimore. (If Washington gets to share the Orioles, Baltimore attractions get to claim they are ''national.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 20, 2011
The folks over at Sun Magazine had a cool feature in their latest issue where 100 Charm City celebrities shared what they love about Baltimore , and a handful of sports figures were among those who chimed in. Cal Ripken Jr. predictably said his favorite thing in Baltimore was Camden Yards. Billy Cundiff likes to grab a bite to eat at Kooper's Tavern in Fells. Domonique Foxworth thinks Harbor East is Baltimore's Inner Harbor for non-tourists. And Jim Palmer's favorite dish is the Veal Saltimbocca at Da Mimmo's.
NEWS
May 17, 1999
THE MARYLAND Science Center breaks all-time attendance records and plans expansion. Port Discovery exceeds its membership projections. The National Historic Seaport is unveiled. The National Aquarium draws record crowds and announces plans for a multimillion-dollar expansion.Not so long ago, Baltimore seemed to have reached its max on museums near the Inner Harbor: The City Life Museums closed. The exhibit hall at the Columbus Center shut down.More recent announcements, however, suggest the doom and gloom may have been misplaced or premature -- at least when it comes to enterprises that relentlessly promote themselves as world-class attractions for visitors and Baltimoreans alike.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Paul McMullen and Gary Lambrecht and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2002
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Chris Wilcox can't explain how he flies through the air, how he hovers above the rim, how he creates some of those electrifying dunks that are the trademarks of his game. "It's great to get people to say, `Dang, what did he just do?' Sometimes I really don't know what I just did," said Wilcox, the 6-foot-10 sophomore power forward who leads Maryland in highlight-reel material. Wilcox, who is mulling over a decision to leave Maryland early and enter the June NBA draft, was at it again during yesterday's informal shoot-around at the Carrier Dome, where the Terps resume their pursuit of another Final Four trip in tonight's East Regional semifinals against Kentucky.
NEWS
August 20, 1999
TO WELCOME publisher John Wiley & Sons would be premature, but news that the company might relocate its headquarters from New York indicates conventional wisdom about Baltimore may be wrong. John Wiley is considering other cities as well as its options in the Big Apple, but it should not be a surprise that Baltimore is in the running. With a precipitous population decline, a horrifying rate of crime and beleaguered school system, most Marylanders have consigned Baltimore to the economic development dustbin.
NEWS
April 29, 2009
No one could have predicted the mammoth crowds that descended on Baltimore's Inner Harbor on Saturday evening for the first really warm weekend of spring. So many visitors may not even have noticed dozens of teenagers running along Pratt Street and through the Harborplace pavilions and the outdoor amphitheater. Only later did passers-by hear that two boys who encountered the group suffered stab wounds and were taken to the hospital. Police, who initially seem to have been caught off balance by the attacks, moved quickly to quell the disturbance and within hours two suspects were in custody.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2000
In the Region US Airways, European carriers discuss partnership US Airways Group Inc. is talking with European airlines about a partnership as part of the sixth-largest U.S. carrier's plan to expand international service, Chairman Stephen Wolf said yesterday. The airline has said that finding a European partner and building an international alliance are priorities this year because new Airbus planes better equip it to increase trans-Atlantic flights, Wolf said. He wouldn't say which airlines are in the talks.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
Visitors to Baltimore's Inner Harbor may soon be greeted by an 8-foot-tall statue of former Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer, after the city's Public Art Commission gave preliminary approval yesterday to plans for a "Schaefer Sculpture Garden" with his bronze likeness as the centerpiece. The panel voted 6-1 to approve plans to place the statue and garden on city-owned land on the west shore of the Inner Harbor, between the Baltimore Visitor Center and the Light Street pavilion of Harborplace.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2010
Operators of a "high-speed sightseeing cruise" planned for Baltimore's harbor have pushed back the start of their service from April 3 to later in the month. Featuring a speedboat named Seadog III and described as "history tour meets thrill ride," the attraction will offer a narrated tour from Baltimore's Inner Harbor to the Key Bridge and back, reaching speeds of up to 32 knots in Baltimore's outer harbor. Steve Dutcher, vice president and general manager of Entertainment Cruises, said the company needs more time to get ready and will announce start dates and other details about its service soon.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 26, 2010
First there was speed dating. Then speed job interviews. And now, speed tourism? That's what's coming to Baltimore. Entertainment Cruises, operator of the Spirit of Baltimore and Inner Harbor Spirit vessels, is planning to offer "high-speed sightseeing cruises" of Baltimore's harbor starting April 3. An open-air speedboat called Seadog III will take up to 120 passengers at a time from the Inner Harbor to the Key Bridge and back, reaching...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
A little past 3 on a sunny afternoon, Natural Resources Police Officer Chris Morris steered his 19-foot Boston whaler around Baltimore's Inner Harbor and then worked his way to the outer edges of his patrol area. He sped by the cans stacked at the Dundalk Marine Terminal and over the Fort McHenry and Harbor tunnels, checked under the Key Bridge, looped around Sparrows Point and Fort Howard, skirted the choppy waters off Hart-Miller Island and ended up in the middle of Middle River. Without stops, the one-way trip took 31 minutes, cruising along at up to 36 knots, or 41 mph. Usually, Morris' "police post" is not so expansive.
NEWS
April 29, 2009
No one could have predicted the mammoth crowds that descended on Baltimore's Inner Harbor on Saturday evening for the first really warm weekend of spring. So many visitors may not even have noticed dozens of teenagers running along Pratt Street and through the Harborplace pavilions and the outdoor amphitheater. Only later did passers-by hear that two boys who encountered the group suffered stab wounds and were taken to the hospital. Police, who initially seem to have been caught off balance by the attacks, moved quickly to quell the disturbance and within hours two suspects were in custody.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
Visitors to Baltimore's Inner Harbor may soon be greeted by an 8-foot-tall statue of former Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer, after the city's Public Art Commission gave preliminary approval yesterday to plans for a "Schaefer Sculpture Garden" with his bronze likeness as the centerpiece. The panel voted 6-1 to approve plans to place the statue and garden on city-owned land on the west shore of the Inner Harbor, between the Baltimore Visitor Center and the Light Street pavilion of Harborplace.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | January 27, 2008
Martin Millspaugh has devoted much of his life to the revitalization of downtown Baltimore - as a journalist, public official, private developer and planning consultant. He was one of those who helped turn its waterfront from a collection of rotting piers and banana boats into today's Inner Harbor - a world-class setting for attractions such as Harborplace, the Maryland Science Center and the National Aquarium in Baltimore. At an age when others might be enjoying a leisurely retirement, Millspaugh is working on a television documentary that enables him to share what has been learned with others.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
As a young Army officer in Oahu, Hawaii, Edward T. Robertson spent the first days of December 1941 setting up guns and cannons on lush hills surrounding Pearl Harbor. "The Army was on full alert," the 83-year-old veteran said yesterday. "We were told we were on the verge of war with Japan. We were well-equipped, contrary to what a lot of people think." But on Dec. 6, Robertson said he received word from his commanding officer that the rumored Japanese attack was off. He and his unit packed up the artillery and put it back in storage.
NEWS
May 31, 2002
It's good that Baltimore has hired a top-flight architectural firm to prescribe Inner Harbor design guidelines for the next 20 years. But that's not nearly enough. After all, a precursor of the very same firm came up with a wonderful concept for Baltimore's Inner Harbor East in the 1980s. But even though that design won a prestigious award from the American Institute of Architects, it was later junked by then-Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. As Cooper, Robertson & Partners -- famous for visionary master plans for New York's Battery Park City and Disney's new town of Celebration in Florida -- start working on Inner Harbor guidelines, the past should serve as a warning.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Bradley Olson and Julie Scharper and Bradley Olson,sun reporters | March 4, 2007
One of two shooting victims drove a minivan into the valet parking area of the Hyatt Regency Hotel at Baltimore's Inner Harbor last night, drawing police cars and ambulances to the city's top tourist area on a busy weekend. Officer Troy Harris, a city police spokesman, said the shooting occurred about 7:30 p.m. more than a dozen blocks to the south, in the 100 block of W. Hamburg St., not far from M&T Bank Stadium. One man was shot several times in the upper body and the other man was wounded in the left arm, police said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.