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NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 6, 1999
This election is making Baltimore famous. Best thing to happen to our national recognition since "Homicide."If Peter buys up any more of Baltimore's downtown, they will have to rename the place Los Angelos.Waco baptized the Clinton administration in 1993, will see it out in 2000 and will exhume it long afterward.Cheer up. It's legal to wash your car again.Pub Date: 9/06/99
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | July 7, 2009
Just 12 blocks separate the old headquarters of Legg Mason at 100 Light St. in downtown Baltimore from its glassy new headquarters at 100 International Drive in Harbor East. But it's a quantum leap for the global asset manager - and the city that fought to keep it in town. The 24-story Legg Mason Tower is part of a wave of waterfront development that marks an expansion and redefinition of Baltimore's downtown - from a relatively compact core with a well-defined business district to a new, linear city that encircles the harbor, with eight miles of shoreline and companies and residences spread out all along the water's edge.
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NEWS
November 20, 2005
High court rules against state An Annapolis youth accused of killing a businessman near the State House will not face state charges after the Supreme Court threw out the prosecutors' appeal. The court passed on an opportunity to clarify one of the so-called Miranda warnings that govern police interrogations. Mayor picks city health chief Dr. Joshua Sharfstein was named Baltimore's health commissioner. Mayor Martin O'Malley picked Sharfstein, a pediatrician, to replace Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, who resigned to run for Congress.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 22, 2007
The paint was wet on the studio walls in the old Emerson Drug Co.'s Bromo Seltzer tower this week when I dropped by on a tour of a rapidly changing part of Baltimore's downtown. In the final days of the summer of 2007, I experienced the tremendous energy in the general neighborhood of the Hippodrome, the University of Maryland and Oriole Park at Camden Yards. The Bromo Tower, a Baltimore landmark at Lombard and Eutaw, was just one of the several addresses I've known all my life that are now in the process of transformation.
NEWS
January 30, 1992
Last year when the Schmoke administration merged the center-city's promotion unit into Baltimore's overall economic development organization, some critics wondered if that meant a faltering city commitment to downtown and its many problems. A clear answer has finally been given: The strong commitment is still there but the burden of financing downtown services and improvements is shifting to the private sector.This is the essence of a proposal to levy a 5 percent surcharge on commercial real estate taxes on 1,000 private properties in a 90-block area from the Inner Harbor to Centre Street.
NEWS
By Mahlon Apgar IV | October 21, 1992
THE General Services Administration's decision to build a major government headquarters in suburban Woodlawn instead of downtown Baltimore is a triumph of technique over policy and technicians over policy-makers.The issue is not only about the location of the U.S. Health Care Financing Administration. It is also about urban policy, regional progress, public leadership and the role of the GSA (the government's real estate agency) in matters of fundamental importance to this nation's cities.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 22, 2007
The paint was wet on the studio walls in the old Emerson Drug Co.'s Bromo Seltzer tower this week when I dropped by on a tour of a rapidly changing part of Baltimore's downtown. In the final days of the summer of 2007, I experienced the tremendous energy in the general neighborhood of the Hippodrome, the University of Maryland and Oriole Park at Camden Yards. The Bromo Tower, a Baltimore landmark at Lombard and Eutaw, was just one of the several addresses I've known all my life that are now in the process of transformation.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | March 4, 2007
When she envisioned a deluxe newsstand, the kind of place to find glossy magazines in dozens of languages, obscure literary journals and fashion quarterlies that cost as much as $90, Christina Cieri thought of only one location. Harbor East. "If I couldn't do it here, I didn't want to do it," the Harbor News owner says. "Do you see it in Federal Hill? In Mount Vernon? In Fells Point? In Canton? I don't." She felt this neighborhood's promise and wanted a part of it. Here, she says, "it's all about the future."
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | July 7, 2009
Just 12 blocks separate the old headquarters of Legg Mason at 100 Light St. in downtown Baltimore from its glassy new headquarters at 100 International Drive in Harbor East. But it's a quantum leap for the global asset manager - and the city that fought to keep it in town. The 24-story Legg Mason Tower is part of a wave of waterfront development that marks an expansion and redefinition of Baltimore's downtown - from a relatively compact core with a well-defined business district to a new, linear city that encircles the harbor, with eight miles of shoreline and companies and residences spread out all along the water's edge.
NEWS
June 22, 1997
THE ABELL BUILDING, rising six stories above the corner of Baltimore and Eutaw streets, is the finest Victorian warehouse in the city. The former YMCA building, at Charles and Saratoga streets, also was built in the 1870s. It is another downtown architectural gem.Could these underused downtown office buildings have a new lease on life as apartments? How about some others, including the 77-year-old Stanbalt Building, a 15-story hulk at 501 St. Paul Place?These are just a few of a number of aging city buildings that are currently being studied for apartment conversion.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | March 4, 2007
When she envisioned a deluxe newsstand, the kind of place to find glossy magazines in dozens of languages, obscure literary journals and fashion quarterlies that cost as much as $90, Christina Cieri thought of only one location. Harbor East. "If I couldn't do it here, I didn't want to do it," the Harbor News owner says. "Do you see it in Federal Hill? In Mount Vernon? In Fells Point? In Canton? I don't." She felt this neighborhood's promise and wanted a part of it. Here, she says, "it's all about the future."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 15, 2006
I was on a walking mission for pecan nougat Easter eggs this week when I turned west off Charles Street at Lexington. Even though I had read several articles about plans for a new look for Center Plaza, I was not ready for what I saw: Construction crews were sawing the trees that lined this 1960s square, and bulldozers were crunching paving stones. Yikes, here we go again! I am just old enough to have known and enjoyed the part of Baltimore that existed before the Charles Center and the modernist urban renewal doctrine was imposed on this part of town.
NEWS
November 20, 2005
High court rules against state An Annapolis youth accused of killing a businessman near the State House will not face state charges after the Supreme Court threw out the prosecutors' appeal. The court passed on an opportunity to clarify one of the so-called Miranda warnings that govern police interrogations. Mayor picks city health chief Dr. Joshua Sharfstein was named Baltimore's health commissioner. Mayor Martin O'Malley picked Sharfstein, a pediatrician, to replace Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, who resigned to run for Congress.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
Baltimore is not a Chicago, a Philadelphia or a Boston -- certainly not a New York. But a study has found that the city built on Formstone and nurtured on Natty Boh might just be closing in on those great metropolises. In the latest affirmation for Baltimore's urban resurgence, a report by the Washington-based Brookings Institution declares Charm City's downtown "emerging," or teeter-tottering on the brink of becoming a full-fledged urban powerhouse. The report, "Who Lives Downtown," which is being released today, analyzes downtowns in 45 U.S. cities, marking population growth and household ownership trends from 1970 to 2000.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 28, 2001
THE OTHER evening, the downtown kinked in traffic knots, I found myself stalled on Guilford Avenue. I was ready to bail out and walk when I spotted a chunk of old Baltimore blessedly on a course to a new life. The venerable old Munsey Building, at the southeast corner of Calvert and Fayette streets, had its white brick east side ripped open. Workers were beginning the process of reconfiguring a 90-year-old skyscraper into apartments, thereby assuring that an esteemed Baltimore landmark will not wind up a parking lot the way its neighbor, the Tower Building, did. In the era of President William Howard Taft, the Munsey housed the old Baltimore News, the leading afternoon paper here.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2000
Piper Marbury Rudnick & Wolfe LLP, the blue-chip law firm whose 1998 decision to move to Mount Washington was seen as a symbolic blow to Baltimore's downtown, said yesterday that it will locate some key operations in a new Inner Harbor office. The firm said it signed a lease for 9,000 square feet to house 17 offices and two conference rooms in the Gallery Building at 111 S. Calvert St. Piper Marbury will keep its main Baltimore-area operations in Mount Washington. The new offices will house Piper Marbury's public finance group, which has remained at the firm's former headquarters at 36 S. Charles St. Paul D. Shelton, a partner in the public finance group, will head the new downtown office.
NEWS
July 7, 1992
The recession continues to topple institutions that once defined Baltimore. The latest to fall is Hamburgers. After 142 years in downtown, it is closing its Charles Center showroom. The clothing company's 12 other stores in the metropolitan area are expected to follow, but only after they are untangled from current leases.Regrettable as Hamburgers' demise is, its departure from the Charles Center site is not without possibilities. For some years now, urban planners have argued that the overhanging structure across Fayette Street that houses Hamburgers is a visual and physical barrier that separates retail stores, banks and the Omni International Hotel from the main business district.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF Sun reporter Richard Irwin contributed to this article | June 25, 1998
A Baltimore County man who apparently had just gotten out of his white Lexus was shot repeatedly in the head yesterday afternoon during a brazen daylight attack near a deli a block from a state office complex west of Baltimore's downtown.Witnesses told police they heard three gunshots followed by a brief pause and three more shots.Police said William E. Gilbert, 51, of the first block of Old Granary Court in the Foxhall Farm development in Catonsville was shot six times, including several times in the head.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 6, 1999
This election is making Baltimore famous. Best thing to happen to our national recognition since "Homicide."If Peter buys up any more of Baltimore's downtown, they will have to rename the place Los Angelos.Waco baptized the Clinton administration in 1993, will see it out in 2000 and will exhume it long afterward.Cheer up. It's legal to wash your car again.Pub Date: 9/06/99
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF Sun reporter Richard Irwin contributed to this article | June 25, 1998
A Baltimore County man who apparently had just gotten out of his white Lexus was shot repeatedly in the head yesterday afternoon during a brazen daylight attack near a deli a block from a state office complex west of Baltimore's downtown.Witnesses told police they heard three gunshots followed by a brief pause and three more shots.Police said William E. Gilbert, 51, of the first block of Old Granary Court in the Foxhall Farm development in Catonsville was shot six times, including several times in the head.
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