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By Elise Armacost | April 14, 1996
I REMEMBER, when I was a child, looking one night across the meadow next to our home and noticing an orange glow that started at the horizon and diffused upwards into space. ''That's the city,'' my father said.I remember being not quite sure whether to believe him, partly because of his penchant for teasing, partly because it just seemed so impossible that you could actually see Baltimore -- or a reflection of it -- from our house in northeastern Carroll County. So far away. That was how the city seemed, literally and figuratively.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's report on strategies to attract immigrants to Baltimore offers dozens of recommendations, but for those who are not immigrants or connected to the immigrant community, it may raise two big questions. First, at a time when the national debate about immigration policy focuses on what to do about those who entered the country illegally, the report makes no distinction whatsoever between immigrants who are citizens, those who are legal aliens or those who have no documentation at all. Is that in our best interests?
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NEWS
By Catherine Rentz and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
As Wendy Wu waited at the end of a Charles Village street to be escorted to her home Friday afternoon, a city police officer urged her and others to stay behind the yellow caution tape; small pieces of earth were still tumbling down the hill into a rail bed after a landslide two days earlier. Wu, 47, needed to go home to grab some things to get her through the next few days: her 10-year-old daughter's lacrosse uniform for a game that night, a Polish costume for a dress-up bazaar at school, books, clothes, hairspray — and a pink and yellow plumeria plant from New Orleans that she didn't want to die. City officials escorted Wu and other residents into their homes on the first block of E. 26th St. to collect personal items after a morning meeting with staff members from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A rusted old Chevy Impala fell victim. As did a new red Cadillac. And a block over, Thomas Saunders' gold Grand Caravan also was hit. On Monday morning, residents in one corner of West Baltimore woke up to find that someone had shot out their car windows. In the chilly air, a group of police officers looked over the damage and took reports. Neighbors, on their porches and in the street, looked on. "This used to be a really nice street," Saunders, 57, said. In all, police counted at least eight damaged cars in the 2200 blocks of N. Dukeland St. and N. Koko Lane.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Baltimore residents are less satisfied with city services than they were last year, but see progress in the city's long-standing fight against violent crime and illegal drugs. Those are some of the mixed findings in the annual Baltimore Citizen Survey, which the University of Baltimore's Schaefer Center for Public Policy completed in October and the Rawlings-Blake administration released Friday. In a statement, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said she's committed to improving Baltimore through "responsible budgeting and focusing on the top priorities of current city residents.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
With plans to demolish 1,500 vacant houses in the next three years, Baltimore officials and the few remaining residents in largely vacant blocks are beginning the early stages of the most delicate of relationships. About 80 residents - each of them representing the last one or two households living in blocks that are otherwise entirely vacant - are to be uprooted this year, the city to take their homes by eminent domain, demolish the structures and establish community gardens. They bring 80 different opinions that the city must respond to. Norma Green, who lives in the West Baltimore neighborhood of Upton, where the city plans to tear down at least several blocks of vacant homes, spoke at a community meeting Tuesday evening in Druid Heights.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore residents are asked to participate in a survey measuring qualify of life issues in the city, online and by phone through Sept. 29, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. The Citizens Survey, which has been conducted since 2009, serves as a report card for the city, Rawlings-Blake said. City agencies use the data to write their budget proposals and gauge their performance. The mayor urged residents to participate. "It is imperative that we have a clear understanding of what issues are impacting our communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
The tornado that blasted through Northeast Baltimore and Parkville - ripping off apartment roofs and toppling trees - also tore a rent in Shanon Price's life. Price stood outside her damaged Mount Pleasant Heights apartment Thursday, contemplating the damage to her red Dodge Stratus, whose windshield was shattered. "I just got this car," she said, looking stunned. The 23-year-old said she had recently moved with her 5-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter from her grandmother's home into their city apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
You might not think a reality TV series titled "Hillbilly Handfishin'" would have much to do with Baltimore and East Coast urban living. But that's not the case. The series that premieres Sunday  at 10 p.m. on Animal Planet will feature at least three couples from the area during its 12-episode run, according to John Jones, post-production supervising producer on the series and resident of Federal Hill. Here's how Animal Planet describes the series (and you can see a video below)
NEWS
February 17, 2012
I enjoyed your article about the gifts given to Baltimore's elected officials by people the city does business with ("Tickets and city ethics law," Feb. 12). Here's my question: How is it not raising major red flags that the city's second most powerful elected official conducts himself in this manner? City Council PresidentBernard C. "Jack" Youngobviously knows what the rules are. He's been in the game long enough. Yet "oral approval" and "cash" (with no receipt) are obvious causes for concern in terms of the excuses and explanations he has provided.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore residents are asked to participate in a survey measuring qualify of life issues in the city, online and by phone through Sept. 29, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. The Citizens Survey, which has been conducted since 2009, serves as a report card for the city, Rawlings-Blake said. City agencies use the data to write their budget proposals and gauge their performance. The mayor urged residents to participate. "It is imperative that we have a clear understanding of what issues are impacting our communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Low income Baltimoreans can get help with their energy bills at a three-day energy assistance event to be hosted by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. The event, called Energy Assistance Week, will be held Tuesday through Thursday at the Morgan State University Student Center. The event will run daily from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. will be on-hand to provide services and support. Only the first 600 qualified applicants will be accepted each day. Residents will be able to avoid service interruption by receiving financial assistance to lower their energy bill.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Sunday's United States vs. Portugal World Cup match was the most watched soccer match in American history, and it set a viewership record here in Baltimore as well.   The Baltimore market had the eighth-highest rating in the country, with an 11.0 overnight rating, according to ESPN. Baltimore was one of 18 markets that set all-time records for soccer viewership. Washington, D.C., led the way with a 13.3 rating, and is the overall leader through 32 matches with a 5.0 rating, ESPN announced Monday.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
Biking and walking are my favorite ways to travel around Baltimore. To be sure I'll make it to work without stopping to wheeze for air, I subscribe to a daily bulletin for air quality reports. Recently, the air quality indicator has been yellow rather than green, and many Baltimoreans can tell the difference - asthma has kept them home from school or made it difficult to work. With summer beginning, Baltimore's smog will only get worse. Four coal plants near Baltimore release pollution that forms smog and contributes to the asthma attacks and other health impacts Baltimore residents are so familiar with.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Horseshoe Casino Baltimore's general manager said Tuesday that joint efforts by his company and the city government to recruit local employees for the new gambling center near downtown have paid off, as Baltimore residents have received about half of the 2,200 job offers made so far. It is not clear how many city residents would be hired for the facility's 1,700 to 1,900 full- and part-time jobs because the job offers were made pending background checks...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
A significant number of Baltimore-area residents are struggling with so many challenges — from a lack of education to the lack of a car — that they're hard-pressed to land a job and even harder-pressed to find one that can lift them out of poverty, according to a regional group of government agencies, nonprofits and other players. "Most of the region's low-skilled job seekers face multiple and complex barriers to employment opportunity that have been getting worse," the Opportunity Collaborative concluded in its report, released Monday.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
About one in four Baltimore residents is living in poverty, a one-year increase of more than 20 percent, according to estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau. Although the recession officially ended in June 2009, a federal survey conducted last year shows that the downturn's enduring effects have led poverty rates to skyrocket over a short period. The uptick is straining government and charitable resources and leaving Baltimore leaders scrambling for solutions. "People who were managing have now dropped into poverty," said Susan J. Roll, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | June 21, 2012
What do you love about your neighborhood? A nonprofit group that promotes Baltimore living is asking city residents to sum it up in a few words and snap a photo. Live Baltimore's " What We Love " effort is a "bit more guerrilla" than previous ad campaigns, said executive director Steve Gondol. It's essentially crowdsourcing -- and reminiscent of " We Are The 99 Percent " photos, except here the people are smiling and clutching notepads with happy anecdotes. "I (heart)
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | May 14, 2014
A typical Baltimore-area resident is in the best position to save money compared with people living in other big metro areas, but many aren't taking advantage of that opportunity, according to an analysis by Interest.com . The site, owned by Bankrate Inc., said the typical household in the Baltimore metro area could save about $24,000 a year based on median expenses and after-tax income. That was No. 1 among 18 large regions the company analyzed. No. 2: Washington, with a "savings opportunity" of nearly $20,000.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Chad Barnhill | May 6, 2014
When Horseshoe Casino Baltimore opens later this year, it will serve as more than just a proud new gateway to downtown Baltimore. The $442-million casino entertainment facility will create 1,700 new jobs downtown - infusing new tax revenue into the community and lowering property taxes for city residents. As the city's largest new employer, Horseshoe Baltimore will offer access to the good-paying jobs and sustainable careers that are essential to achieving this administration's goal of attracting 10,000 new families to Baltimore.
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