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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
The adult literacy nonprofit Baltimore Reads Inc. announced Friday it would cease operations June 30 because of funding problems. Founded in 1988 by then-Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke as part of the "City That Reads" campaign, the organization said it had helped more than 10,000 people learn to read when it celebrated its 25th anniversary last year. It also has taught English as a second language and GED preparation classes. The group lists a staff of 14 on its web site. "This was not a decision made lightly, or without regard to its impact on the community which BRI has served for over 26 years," said Clare Miller, President of Baltimore Reads, Inc. As funding became harder to raise, the group's board sought a partner, without success.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2014
I was blessed to be an instructor at Baltimore Reads, Inc. It gave thousands of books away and taught English, civics and literacy. It gave students a power that only comes through education. The instructors and administration taught in all elements, often dragging our classrooms from site to site. Our students meant everything. Their goals meant everything. It was heartbreaking to inform them we were closing. Why? Funding. Money. It told the students their futures weren't good enough to fund.
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NEWS
July 3, 2014
In 1988, Ronald Reagan was president and Kurt L. Schmoke was mayor of Baltimore. Mayor Schmoke had a vision for Baltimore as "The City that Reads," and from that vision Baltimore Reads was born ( "Funding woes close Baltimore Reads," May 2). Over its 26 year history, Baltimore Reads engaged in a number of literacy services for the city including providing a book bank for families and schools and offering classes for youth and adults. In the last several years, Baltimore Reads has given away hundreds of thousands of books and helped thousands of Baltimore Residents learn to read, speak English and earn their high school diplomas by passing the GED exam.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
In 1988, Ronald Reagan was president and Kurt L. Schmoke was mayor of Baltimore. Mayor Schmoke had a vision for Baltimore as "The City that Reads," and from that vision Baltimore Reads was born ( "Funding woes close Baltimore Reads," May 2). Over its 26 year history, Baltimore Reads engaged in a number of literacy services for the city including providing a book bank for families and schools and offering classes for youth and adults. In the last several years, Baltimore Reads has given away hundreds of thousands of books and helped thousands of Baltimore Residents learn to read, speak English and earn their high school diplomas by passing the GED exam.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2008
Salary: $42,000 Age: 36 Years on the job: Two How she got started: Harris grew up in Trinidad but moved back to Toronto, where she was born, to attend college. She received a bachelor's degree in English from York University. She also holds an International Education Diploma from the London Montessori Centre. Before coming to Baltimore, Harris worked in early childhood education at Montessori schools in Toronto. She moved to Baltimore to be with her fiance and began volunteering as a tutor with Baltimore Reads, a nonprofit that specializes in teaching adult literacy.
NEWS
By Joy Green and Joy Green,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
Some civic groups raise money each year by throwing a lavish ball, complete with live music and formal attire. The Phantom Ball is nothing like that. The annual bash sponsored by the Baltimore Reads literacy organization - a fund-raiser that has brought in more than $500,000 in the past nine years - invites donors to purchase tickets and even tables for an imaginary event. They can contribute to a worthy cause, but avoid the obligation of attending a black-tie affair. "People like the idea that they do not need to get dressed up and attend a traditional gala event," said Jim R. Williams, a former event chairman and co-creator of the ball.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
Maggi G. Gaines, who for 12 years has headed Baltimore Reads, the state's largest literacy initiative, will leave the post to direct a new national group promoting community service among Jews. Gaines, 51, will start a new job in January as executive director of Partnership for Service and Learning Movement, a nonprofit organization underwritten by several foundations. Based in Baltimore, the group will work to "raise the value of service within the Jewish community," Gaines said yesterday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 29, 2001
Officials at the Baltimore Reads literacy organization are counting down to Saturday's annual "Books for Kids Day" collection, hoping to bring in 50,000 new or "gently used" books for distribution to families throughout the area. The collection, which will take place at Polytechnic Institute on Cold Spring Lane, will replenish the children's book supply at Baltimore Reads' 15 distribution sites and its downtown book bank, which annually give more than 65,000 books to children and adults.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 21, 2000
The annual Baltimore Reads Books For Kids Day book collection project pulled in more than 25,000 children's books for the Baltimore-based literacy organization that operates a year-round book bank for low-income families. The book drive drew support from more than 100 groups and individuals, culminating in a drop-off May 13 at Polytechnic Institute and Western High School in Baltimore. A top contributor was Bayside Elementary School in the Queen Anne's County community of Stevensville, where two pupils - Stephanie Nhem and Caitlin Driscoll - led an effort that collected 2,300 books.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Reads hopes to collect 75,000 titles at its 17th annual Books for Kids Day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the parking lot of Poly-Western High School, Falls Road and Cold Spring Lane. The nonprofit organization, dedicated to fostering literacy, will accept new or gently used books and redistribute them through its Book Bank. It collects books for Baltimore-area schools, teachers, Head Start centers, social services agencies, community organizations and needy families. Since the book bank was founded 20 years ago, more than 1.6 million books have been collected and given away.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
The adult literacy nonprofit Baltimore Reads Inc. announced Friday it would cease operations June 30 because of funding problems. Founded in 1988 by then-Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke as part of the "City That Reads" campaign, the organization said it had helped more than 10,000 people learn to read when it celebrated its 25th anniversary last year. It also has taught English as a second language and GED preparation classes. The group lists a staff of 14 on its web site. "This was not a decision made lightly, or without regard to its impact on the community which BRI has served for over 26 years," said Clare Miller, President of Baltimore Reads, Inc. As funding became harder to raise, the group's board sought a partner, without success.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
Paul Goodman, a retired construction company executive and artist, died July 18 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Fox Hill, an assisted-living facility in Bethesda. The former longtime Pikesville resident was 96. The son of Abraham Goodman, a bricklayer who emigrated from Poland, and Anna Wolfe Goodman, a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised on Whittier Avenue. His father took a job with Bethlehem Steel Corp., lining coke ovens with brick at the company's Sparrows Point plant.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Reads hopes to collect 75,000 titles at its 17th annual Books for Kids Day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the parking lot of Poly-Western High School, Falls Road and Cold Spring Lane. The nonprofit organization, dedicated to fostering literacy, will accept new or gently used books and redistribute them through its Book Bank. It collects books for Baltimore-area schools, teachers, Head Start centers, social services agencies, community organizations and needy families. Since the book bank was founded 20 years ago, more than 1.6 million books have been collected and given away.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 27, 2012
Want to do a good deed -- and clean out those books lying around the house? Head to the parking lot of Poly-Western High School next Saturday, May 5, as Baltimore Reads holds its annual Books for Kids Day. At the event, which runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., you can donate new or gently used books that will be redistributed through the organization's Book Bank. The goal: to collect 75,000 books over the coming year. The Baltimore Sun gives hundreds of books to the Book Bank each year -- stack and stacks of review copies that I don't have the time to read.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Gardening held little appeal to Stacey Watkins, a Baltimore special-education teacher, until an organization that helps keep her classroom in books put out a call for help with an urban planting project. She soon found her manicured hands could do wonders with dirt. Within a few hours last week, Watkins, who dug unencumbered by garden gloves, had planted straight rows of broccoli, kale, cauliflower and all manner of herbs in a vacant, long-neglected lot along Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Former contestants from "Project Runway" and "The Fashion Show" will showcase their spring collections Saturday during "Drive 2 Thrive," an event that will benefit several local charitable causes at the Atrium of Port Discovery Children's Museum. In its third year, the event has helped various causes such as Baltimore Reads, Inc., Foundation of the Maryland Academy of Pediatricians, Greater Baltimore Urban League Freedom Readers Program, and LIGHT Health and Wellness Comprehensive Services.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2000
The seven members of Tracy Horner's class at Mount Washington Elementary School were entrusted with the task of collecting, counting, sorting and packing hundreds -- and then thousands -- of books for the Baltimore Reads Books for Kids Day on Saturday. It was no ordinary task, and this was no ordinary class, said Julie Lenovitz, the North Baltimore school's interim master teacher. The seven children have a variety of learning disabilities. They took enthusiastically to the challenge of processing the books donated by fellow pupils.
NEWS
October 21, 2001
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills. Among them: Baltimore Reads, 5 E. Read St., Baltimore, is looking for volunteers to serve as tutors and reading coaches for children and families. Information: The Baltimore Reads Hotline, 410-576-7323 or the group's Web site, www.baltimore reads.org. To be included in this listing, call Sundial at 410-783-1800 and enter code 6130.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2008
Salary: $42,000 Age: 36 Years on the job: Two How she got started: Harris grew up in Trinidad but moved back to Toronto, where she was born, to attend college. She received a bachelor's degree in English from York University. She also holds an International Education Diploma from the London Montessori Centre. Before coming to Baltimore, Harris worked in early childhood education at Montessori schools in Toronto. She moved to Baltimore to be with her fiance and began volunteering as a tutor with Baltimore Reads, a nonprofit that specializes in teaching adult literacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LIZ ATWOOD | December 7, 2008
Shirley Bigley LaMotte is the chief executive officer of Baltimore Reads, which in January will celebrate its 20th anniversary of providing adult literacy services to Baltimore families. In addition to providing literacy classes, Baltimore Reads runs a free-to-all book bank at The Baltimore Sun, at 501 N. Calvert St. Shirley and her husband, businessman and former state delegate Lawrence A. LaMotte, are longtime residents of Guilford. 1 A good, hot breakfast like my mom always makes: "You really don't want me at that 8 a.m. meeting without it!"
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