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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang | August 5, 1991
The grass is almost 3 feet high and piled with garbage. Boarded-up houses missing doors and filled with smelly trash sit scattered among the row houses in one of West Baltimore's poorest neighborhoods.Denise Gaither and Judy Washington, in tennis shoes and carrying notebooks, walk through Sandtown-Winchester every day, rain or shine, with one mission in mind: to find pregnant women."Most of the mothers in this area are poor; some are homeless and some abuse drugs," said Ms. Gaither, one of eight "neighborhood health advocates" for the Baltimore Project, a pilot program to reach and monitor high-risk pregnant women.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts announced that New York-based Stephen Powers , known for his public art projects, will create a series of large-scale murals as part of a project called "Love Letter to Baltimore. " Permanent and temporary murals will appear at various locations in East Baltimore and Southwest Baltimore. The object, BOPA says, is to concentrate the murals "around high-traffic transportation corridors, visible to people on the street as well as travelers and commuters passing through Baltimore by car or train.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
From a makeshift stage on a vacant lot in the heart of East Baltimore, officials stressed two themes yesterday at a celebratory announcement of key agreements to make a proposed biotech park a reality. One was the promise of the project - which could create 8,000 jobs and hundreds of units of new and rehabilitated housing - to transform the disintegrated area around the Johns Hopkins medical complex into a vibrant community that is an asset to the entire city. The other was the difficulty in forging agreements on the makeup of a board to oversee the park's development, to fairly compensate residents who will have to be relocated and to ensure that the mostly poor, black community benefits from the project.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Baltimore's Theatre Project 2014-15 season features a mix of cutting-edge shows and those with an established track record. The line-up, which the theater's artistic team announced on Tuesday in a news release, ranges from Charlie Bethel's one-man version of Homer's "The Odyssey," to storyteller Jon Spelman's musings about mortality in "The Prostate Dialogues" to an operatic version of Jane Austen's novel, "Mansfield Park" performed by the...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 14, 1996
Any theatrical production that requires a statement of explanation beforehand is probably in trouble. So, when cast member Susan J. Rotkovitz steps on stage and reads a prepared statement about "The Baltimore Project," things do not look promising.As it turns out, however, it isn't the explanation that's the problem, it's the realization that this 50-minute piece is more an exercise than a finished work.Created by graduate students in Towson State University's theater program under the direction of the professional Touchstone Theatre Ensemble of Bethlehem, Pa., "The Baltimore Project" purports to capture "the textures, rhythms, and colors of Baltimore's everyday life," according to the program.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1996
The piece playing today at the Theatre Project took shape like a statue carved out of smoke.Called "The Baltimore Project," it was created by graduate students from Towson State University's theater drama program, rigorously guided by professionals from the much-acclaimed Touchstone Theater Ensemble of Bethlehem, Pa.Seven students working toward master of fine arts degrees fanned out into Baltimore in search of their own vision of the city. They looked for characters and quirks, icons and legends, myths and truths.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Thomas W. Waldron and Laura Lippman and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | August 6, 1991
Rozetta Timmons had a $100-a-day heroin habit and no intention of quitting. Then she got pregnant.Determined not to have a drug-addicted baby, she recalled two women who had been canvassing her neighborhood, looking for pregnant women. They had tried to tell her about something called the Baltimore Project, at the old Douglass High School, but Timmons hadn't been interested. Now she was.So she went to the old school, looking for a woman she could describe only as having long hair and pretty eyes.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2005
A developer of Baltimore's Ritz-Carlton Residences who has been accused of fraud by his partners filed a lawsuit in return yesterday, saying they cheated him out of his ownership interest in the $250 million luxury condo project under construction at the foot of Federal Hill. Edward V. Giannasca II's suit in federal court in Baltimore accused owners of Midtown Equities LLC of New York and its Midtown Baltimore LLC unit of fraud, breach of contract, invasion of privacy, interference with business and contractual relationships and civil conspiracy, two attorneys said.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
The transformation of the old Montgomery Ward & Co. warehouse into Baltimore's largest office complex hit a snag yesterday when the city - trying to send a message - refused to approve a $92,000 public subsidy until more minority contractors gain work at the site. As have most developers awarded public funding in Baltimore, Samuel K. Him- melrich Jr., the lead developer, agreed to hire substantial numbers of minority- and women-owned companies for jobs such as installing drywall and electrical wiring.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | November 29, 1992
Conventional wisdom is not always common sense, and learning the distinction can make a world of difference.That's one lesson gleaned from the Baltimore Project in Sandtown-Winchester, one of the city's poorest areas. The project is the Schmoke administration's attempt to demonstrate that some simple and sensible efforts can have a big effect on Baltimore's high rate of infant mortality.Coordinated by the city health department with financial support from local foundations, the two-year-old project has worked well enough to help the city win one of 15 federal "Healthy Start" grants, designed to meet the ambitious goal of helping to lower the country's infant mortality rate by 50 percent over five years.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
A 24-year-old woman was shot and killed in a public housing project in East Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon, police said. Gwendolyn Johnson was shot in the torso shortly before 4 p.m. in the 800 block of Abbott Court in the Latrobe Homes community, according to police. Johnson, of the Broadway East neighborhood, was later pronounced dead at a hospital. Police had no suspects. Two people were killed last year in the complex, which is bounded by East Madison Street and East Eager Street, with Ensor Street running through the middle.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Will Barton took a step back and drained a short jumper. But this time, he wasn't on an NBA hardwood. Instead, Barton was taking the first shot at the Easterwood Park court, which was renovated this summer as part of a collaboration between Under Armour Win Baltimore Initiative and the NBA. "It's great to see the smiles on the kids' faces and the parents appreciate it and just to give them an environment to play safely is great," said Matt...
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
In a pair of working gloves with the Ravens logo emblazoned on the front, San Francisco Mayor Edwin M. Lee painted broad brush strokes at a West Baltimore police station Friday to make good on a bet. Had the Ravens lost to the 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake would have traveled to the West Coast to complete a day of service, which was the wager she and Lee made on the February game. "I think San Francisco is a lovely city, but I am glad I did not have to go there in payment of a debt," said Rawlings-Blake, who traded in her signature high heels for a pair of wedge booties for the day of activities.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
One of Baltimore's most prolific developers faces two lawsuits for unpaid bills related to stalled urban renewal projects along the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River. A lawsuit against Turner Development's principal, Patrick Turner, and a second suit against a Turner-affiliated company are pending in Baltimore Circuit Court - asserting claims totaling more than $200,000. The suits further complicate the development of prime waterfront real estate that has been slated for renewal, by Turner and others, for much of the last decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tony Sclafani, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
Most weeks for the past year, Rachel Taft has headed to the Canton Safeway or Middle River Costco to pick up several pounds of steak or tofu for dinner. Unlike most bulk shoppers, Taft wasn't cooking for several children - she was feeding a loose-knit family of punk-rock bands at her Highlandtown home. Last year, Taft founded Feed the Scene, a "band and breakfast" which provides room and board to artists with small (or no) budgets. Since then, she's cooked for ska punks Less Than Jake, punk-rocker Joey Cape from Lagwagon and more than 170 other groups.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
A boy who came home from school and found his mother dead was then bound with belts and duct tape by her alleged killer, whom police arrested last week. Edward Ford, 36, was charged with first-degree murder in the death of 44-year-old Cheryl Thomas, who was discovered dead in her home in the McCulloh Homes housing project near downtown Thursday afternoon. According to police, Thomas' son returned from school and found her in her bedroom, handcuffed behind her back and with her feet bound.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1990
HOME FINANCINGBankers, FTC prepare free 'primer' brochureThe Mortgage Bankers Association of America and thFederal Trade Commission have prepared a brochure -- "Home Financing Primer" -- to help those who are working and saving to buy their home.It answers some of the most frequently asked questions about home financing.It is available free by writing to: Public Reference, Federal Trade Commission, 6th and Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20580.Organizations promote citywide open houseThe Hometown Baltimore project, the Greater BaltimorBoard of Realtors and The Baltimore Sun are promoting a citywide open house program to heighten awareness of city neighborhoods.
NEWS
September 30, 1995
BALTIMORE HAS CAUSE to celebrate. The $22.7 million grant the city received to demolish and replace a public housing complex at the 14.7-acre Lexington Terrace site may be some of the last money Washington awards for such purposes.Did politics -- and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's friendship with President Clinton -- play a role in Baltimore's selection as one of the only four cities to win a grant? Possibly. But the fact is Baltimore submitted an innovative proposal that promises to transform what today is a dilapidated and crime-ridden warren of high-rises into a stable and less dense community of renters and homeowners.
FEATURES
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
A new nonprofit organization aims to turn the fruits of its labors into fresh food for the hungry. The Baltimore Orchard Project will glean gather otherwise unwanted fruit from trees on public and private land and donate the harvest to food banks, congregations and soup kitchens, says founder and director Nina Beth Cardin, a rabbi and community activist. The group's founding team has 25 members from such agencies as the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future, Tree Baltimore and Baltimore Green Space.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Michael Owen has spent a lot of time around love - even as he began to lose his faith in it. As the artist behind the Baltimore Love Project, Owen has painted the image of hands forming the word "love" on 11 walls scattered throughout the city. In June 2010, when he and his wife, Shelley, separated (their formal divorce is pending), he almost quit the project. How could he keep painting this word when he barely believed in it? Instead, Owen, 29, threw himself at his work, finishing more murals than ever.
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