Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaltimore Program
IN THE NEWS

Baltimore Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Abbe Gluck bTC and Abbe Gluck bTC,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
Because of incorrect information supplied to The Sun, it was reported yesterday that Fastnet is a same- and next-day delivery service offered by the U.S. Postal Service. Fastnet does not offer same-day service.The Sun regrets the errors.Calling Baltimore at once "unique" and "middle of the road," QVC Inc. has chosen Charm City for its first venture in local programming.The television shopping network has selected 20 products from more than 400 submitted by local manufacturers, retailers and restaurants for "Hometown Baltimore," a three-hour pilot program be aired Oct. 5 in Baltimore and the five surrounding counties.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
More than 6 million children die annually around the globe from largely preventable problems such as diarrhea and pneumonia, but a $500 million, five-year effort led by the Baltimore-based nonprofit Jhpiego aims to put a big dent in those statistics. The money is the second-largest award the Johns Hopkins University affiliate has ever managed and is the flagship grant this year from the U.S. Agency for International Development, the nation's foreign aid bureau that spends $1.5 billion annually to prevent mother and baby deaths in poor countries.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
Using music, poetry, dance and art, the Black Male Identity Project has been striving for the past year to overturn negative stereotypes of African-American men. "We know that Baltimore City has a lot of problems, but we wanted to celebrate the role of artists, of storytellers in producing narratives that can help us discover solutions," said Fanon Hill, a musician and co-director of the project. On Sunday, the project concluded at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, but organizers say the program's positive message will carry on here and elsewhere.
SPORTS
By Tim Schwartz, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Baltimore native Lydell Henry, 36, has been around wrestling his whole life. But everywhere he went, wrestling was disappearing. A 1995 graduate of Dunbar High, Henry placed second in the Maryland Scholastic Association tournament his junior year. He went on to wrestle at Morgan State, but in 1996, the school dropped the program. In 2002, Dunbar also eliminated wrestling. To restore Baltimore as a place where wrestlers can thrive, he and Hermondoz Thompson, also a 1995 Dunbar graduate, co-founded Beat the Streets - Baltimore in 2011.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1997
An East Baltimore program that counsels children who are exposed to violent crime now has a powerful partner, the federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.The agency, a division of the Department of Justice, will provide technical assistance to the Child Development Community Policing program, the only one of its kind in Baltimore.The program, which began in April, involves police and therapists at Johns Hopkins Hospital's East Baltimore Mental Health Partnership. It seeks to prevent children who are victims of violence from becoming violent adults.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
Investigators looking into the possible misuse of millions of dollars at a Baltimore program for poor pregnant women have focused on relationships between former administrators and several companies with whom they did business.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that a review of the financial records for Healthy Start Inc. indicated that several area companies might have illegally profited through the relationships.City Health Department officials confirmed Wednesday that the Baltimore state's attorney has begun a civil and criminal investigation into the $3.2 million program to help distressed women and children in Sandtown-Winchester and Harlem Park in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | August 6, 1992
Thousands of Maryland children who rely on free and reduced-price lunches during the school year cannot get the same meals in the summer because onerous federal requirements keep communities from setting up programs, a national group has charged.Fewer than 20 percent of the 144,000 children in Maryland eligible for the subsidized meals received them in July 1991, the Food Research Action Committee (FRAC) announced today.While that percentage compares favorably with the national average of 15.1 percent, the state figure is skewed by the Baltimore program, which is considered one of the better in the country.
NEWS
February 9, 2006
Mentor pairs to get access to city cultural institutions Baltimore residents who mentor a child would have free access to more than 30 city cultural institutions, from the Baltimore Museum of Art to the Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards, under a program announced yesterday. About 350 "mentoring pairs" are eligible for the ACCESS Baltimore program - which aims to broaden the number of places mentors can take children - and officials hope the initiative will encourage 150 more people to become mentors this year.
NEWS
November 18, 1993
The Baltimore region presents some peculiar challenges to civic leadership. Unlike most other cities, Baltimore is an independent entity and not part of a county. Thus, many Baltimore area executives have a foot in two places: they work in the city but may live in a surrounding county.This kind of division of energies and loyalties is taxing. Ask the area's volunteer organizations or cultural institutions, which have to compete for resources from this scarce pool of leaders.The situation would be even more difficult if not for a concept called the Leadership.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
It makes good sense: Give a low-income pregnant woman intensive care and support and make sure she gets proper nutrition - and her baby will be healthier at birth with a lower probability of developmental problems. That's the aim of Healthy Start, a federally funded program with 100 projects across the country, including one in Baltimore. But reauthorization of the program has been languishing in Congress since 2005. Legislation that would give Healthy Start, which saves money and lives, more time and perhaps more money is finally moving and deserves to pass sooner rather than later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will be announcing its 2014-2015 season in a few weeks. As is the case every year, I am hoping for a whole bunch of surprises, a filling in of long-standing gaps in the BSO's repertoire. And, naturally, I am especially hoping to hear more of my favorite stuff (it's all about me, as you know). In the same way the BSO and its audiences should be getting a wider sampling of guest conductors (off hand, I can think of Osmo Vanska, Jaap van Zweden, Manfred Honeck, Benjamin Zander and the apparently indefatigable Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos)
NEWS
By Ragina Cooper-Averella | January 30, 2014
Legislative reforms are desperately needed to address issues with Maryland's speed camera programs in school zones, particularly in Baltimore City, where the problems have been so pervasive and so well-documented that the system has been suspended since April. We know that speed camera citations have been issued to deceased motorists and "signed" and authorized by a deceased police officer. Motorists have been cited for speeding in school zones when they were not moving at all - including a AAA Mid-Atlantic roadside assistance truck, which was cited for going 57 miles per hour in a school zone, despite being stopped at a red light.
NEWS
By Paul T. Graziano | November 11, 2013
In East Baltimore, the 1200 block of North Broadway was once almost entirely vacant. Now a woman who moved to the city from Parkville has made it her family's home. There were once 25 vacants on this block; only six remain, all of which are under construction. Farther south, a man whose home has been in his family for three generations has seen a transformation on the 200 block of North Madeira Street. Eleven long-vacant properties have been sold or auctioned to developers, the street and sidewalks have been repaved, and a stream of new neighbors is moving in. Around the corner, a longtime resident began renovating homes on Mullikin Street, building on the momentum of Madeira Street's revitalization.
NEWS
By George W. Nellies | November 4, 2013
The latest plane being rolled out of the hangar at Dallas Dance Airlines (also known as the Baltimore County Public School headquarters) should be grounded before it has a chance to take off. The recently announced plan to move to an eight-class semester from seven ("8 classes a semester for Balto. County high schools," Oct. 30) - is yet another far-reaching initiative coming at a time when teachers are still trying to cope with a new curriculum and a new teacher evaluation system.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
The transformation of a vacant, 12-story eyesore into a gleaming office building has brought workers, shoppers and diners to the northern edge of downtown Towson - thanks in part to a public financing package that waived repayment of millions of dollars in loans to a developer. The county makes so-called conditional loans that do not require repayment if certain conditions, such as job creation, are met. The $3.5 million in conditional loans to Caves Valley Partners for the Towson project would rank as the largest ever forgiven; others have provided $300,000 to demolish vacant Pikesville buildings and $40,000 to renovate a bank branch in Randallstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
The latest program from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is as safe as it comes - an old-fashioned mix of 19th-century fare. But with one of the BSO's regular guests, German-born conductor Jun Markl, back on the podium, you can count on considerable energy and sensitivity to give the familiar fare a good jolt. Those qualities are also much in evidence from the other guest for this program, German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser, in his BSO debut. On Thursday night at the Music Center at Strathmore, Markl got things started with a genial account of Dvorak's lovely Serenade for Strings.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
Civic Works, the kind of youth service corps being championed by President Clinton as part of his domestic agenda to reshape America, officially kicked off its Baltimore program yesterday.At Civic Works, housed in the historic Clifton Mansion in Northeast Baltimore, 25 males and females, who range in ages from 17 to 25, will learn carpentry, landscaping, construction skills and health care.Civic Works' officials hope that with those skills will come self-esteem and pride in teamwork and the place where they live.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
As Columbia moves toward a more urban-style, walkable downtown center, local officials want to introduce a bike-sharing program similar to those that have become popular in cities across the country. Howard County officials are working with the Columbia Association to apply for a state grant to evaluate the feasibility of providing bike rental kiosks, for short-term use, at various locations in Columbia and other areas of the county. Advocates say bike sharing would provide a cheap alternative to cars, ease traffic congestion and promote fitness.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Nearly 30 years after they first met while living in the same East Baltimore housing project, and 20 years after they left Dunbar to play college basketball, Rodrick Harrison and Rodney Elliott are back in their hometown with a new dream. Harrison, the second-year coach at Mount Zion Prep, and Elliott, one of his assistants, are trying to give players who didn't have the grades or game coming out of high school a chance to do what they did. Harrison, who played at UMBC and was later an assistant coach at Dunbar, and Elliott, who played at Maryland before embarking on a 13-year professional career spent mostly in Europe, teamed last year with the Mount Zion Baptist Christian School in Northeast Baltimore to provide the academic support and basketball guidance for a dozen or so players each year.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
In the mid-1980s, a Gilman offensive lineman named Mark Agent enrolled at Maryland to play football. After that, years turned into decades before the Terps managed to take the next step with the Baltimore school. Longtime Gilman coach Biff Poggi said he can't recall another Greyhounds player committing to Maryland until fullback Kenneth Goins selected the Terps , arriving as a freshman last season. Goins was followed by quarterback Shane Cockerille a year later. For Maryland, it's akin to a thaw after a long winter.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.