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By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
The veterans brought their dog tags and their service medals and their stories. The students brought their tape recorders and their cameras and their questions. And, for a morning, the history of World War II became not just a few chapters in a high school textbook, but the life-changing event it was for the men who served in it. Forty veterans returned yesterday to their alma mater, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, to be interviewed by a group of 11th-grade historians-in-training working on an oral history project.
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NEWS
By Ann Klassen | June 22, 2008
On my street I have many neighbors, but in recent days my attention has been focused on two who are not people. They are large tracts of trees and fields, set aside long ago to offer city dwellers green space for recreation, enjoyment and health. Last Tuesday's Sun brought me photos of both my neighbors, in typical poses. One photo showed a man enjoying the sunny weather by batting a tennis ball against a faded cement wall; the second featured a businesswoman by a high chain-link fence, behind which stretched trees, open fields, and a stream.
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NEWS
April 17, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for retired Army Lt. Col. Paul E. Waters, who taught at the Polytechnic Institute for 11 years, will be offered at 8 p.m. today at Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Church, Liberty Heights Avenue and Edgewood Road. Colonel Waters, who was 72 and lived on Stevenswood Road in Randallstown, died Friday of emphysema at the Baltimore County General Hospital.He taught for a year at Garrison Junior High School before transferring to Baltimore Polytechnic, where he taught history and French.
NEWS
June 3, 2008
Schools obliged to offer support I applaud Gregory Kane for his insistence that students enrolled in high schools with academic entrance requirements take responsibility for their academic and social success. Indeed, all students should attend school with such a sense of responsibility ("There's no room for hand-holding," May 28). I fear, however, that he missed the point of Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso's insistence that these schools demonstrate support for these students before dismissing them from their programs.
NEWS
September 14, 1993
Myrtle H. ShuppertSecretaryMyrtle H. Shuppert, a former secretary at the Department of Justice and a longtime resident of Baltimore County, died Aug. 23 at the Shrewsbury Retirement Village in Shrewsbury, Pa. She was 94 and had suffered a stroke about two years ago.Before moving to the retirement village, she lived in Corbett for 53 years.The former Myrtle Hendrix was a native of New Freedom, Pa., one of 12 children, and she was reared in Maryland Line. She took courses at Baltimore Polytechnic, receiving a certificate in 1923, and continued her studies at Strayers Business College in Baltimore.
NEWS
June 3, 2008
Schools obliged to offer support I applaud Gregory Kane for his insistence that students enrolled in high schools with academic entrance requirements take responsibility for their academic and social success. Indeed, all students should attend school with such a sense of responsibility ("There's no room for hand-holding," May 28). I fear, however, that he missed the point of Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso's insistence that these schools demonstrate support for these students before dismissing them from their programs.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2001
When you're graduating near the top of the class, your next step cushioned with scholarships, May could be a smooth glide toward commencement. But not for the students in the Ingenuity Project at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. Recently in an advanced math class, students hunched over desks, taking notes as fellow classmates presented strategies for hurdling such subjects as Pythagorean theorem proofs. Moreover, they were having fun. Although exams are long over, these teen-agers seem reluctant to leave the intellectual world that has nurtured them.
NEWS
By Ann Klassen | June 22, 2008
On my street I have many neighbors, but in recent days my attention has been focused on two who are not people. They are large tracts of trees and fields, set aside long ago to offer city dwellers green space for recreation, enjoyment and health. Last Tuesday's Sun brought me photos of both my neighbors, in typical poses. One photo showed a man enjoying the sunny weather by batting a tennis ball against a faded cement wall; the second featured a businesswoman by a high chain-link fence, behind which stretched trees, open fields, and a stream.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | November 19, 2006
Now, this was the way to holiday shop. Stroll through the book stacks and gift sections of Greetings & Readings, with a drink in one hand, and something to nosh on in the other. Hmmm. That book looks interesting. Why, let's just stop and chat with the author. Maybe pick up a couple of personally signed copies for that extra-special gift. That's how a few hundred folks went about it recently at Book Bash 2006 in the name of a good cause -- raising money for Literacy Works Inc. As guests arrived at the store in Hunt Valley Towne Centre, they were greeted with the music of a live jazz band at the top of the escalator.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Liz Bowie and Gina Davis and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporters | September 6, 2007
When Maryland's top school officer proposed that the state back away from its tough high school testing program last week, one reason might have been the troubling performance of some suburban schools. An alarming pattern of failure is surfacing: Minority students, especially African-Americans, are struggling to pass the exams in the suburban classrooms their families had hoped would provide a better education. "It is a wake-up call to African-Americans in Maryland," said Dunbar Brooks, president of the state school board and former president of the Baltimore County school board.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Liz Bowie and Gina Davis and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporters | September 6, 2007
When Maryland's top school officer proposed that the state back away from its tough high school testing program last week, one reason might have been the troubling performance of some suburban schools. An alarming pattern of failure is surfacing: Minority students, especially African-Americans, are struggling to pass the exams in the suburban classrooms their families had hoped would provide a better education. "It is a wake-up call to African-Americans in Maryland," said Dunbar Brooks, president of the state school board and former president of the Baltimore County school board.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | November 19, 2006
Now, this was the way to holiday shop. Stroll through the book stacks and gift sections of Greetings & Readings, with a drink in one hand, and something to nosh on in the other. Hmmm. That book looks interesting. Why, let's just stop and chat with the author. Maybe pick up a couple of personally signed copies for that extra-special gift. That's how a few hundred folks went about it recently at Book Bash 2006 in the name of a good cause -- raising money for Literacy Works Inc. As guests arrived at the store in Hunt Valley Towne Centre, they were greeted with the music of a live jazz band at the top of the escalator.
TOPIC
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Next month, Charles McDaniels will graduate from Frederick Douglass High School, the alma mater of civil rights attorney and former Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. McDaniels' graduation date will come 50 years and a month after Marshall, then the chief counsel for the NAACP, won his historic fight to desegregate Douglass and every other public school in America. Marshall argued that integrated schools would offer more academic opportunities for blacks and more social possibilities for both blacks and whites.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2001
When you're graduating near the top of the class, your next step cushioned with scholarships, May could be a smooth glide toward commencement. But not for the students in the Ingenuity Project at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. Recently in an advanced math class, students hunched over desks, taking notes as fellow classmates presented strategies for hurdling such subjects as Pythagorean theorem proofs. Moreover, they were having fun. Although exams are long over, these teen-agers seem reluctant to leave the intellectual world that has nurtured them.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
The veterans brought their dog tags and their service medals and their stories. The students brought their tape recorders and their cameras and their questions. And, for a morning, the history of World War II became not just a few chapters in a high school textbook, but the life-changing event it was for the men who served in it. Forty veterans returned yesterday to their alma mater, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, to be interviewed by a group of 11th-grade historians-in-training working on an oral history project.
NEWS
September 14, 1993
Myrtle H. ShuppertSecretaryMyrtle H. Shuppert, a former secretary at the Department of Justice and a longtime resident of Baltimore County, died Aug. 23 at the Shrewsbury Retirement Village in Shrewsbury, Pa. She was 94 and had suffered a stroke about two years ago.Before moving to the retirement village, she lived in Corbett for 53 years.The former Myrtle Hendrix was a native of New Freedom, Pa., one of 12 children, and she was reared in Maryland Line. She took courses at Baltimore Polytechnic, receiving a certificate in 1923, and continued her studies at Strayers Business College in Baltimore.
TOPIC
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Next month, Charles McDaniels will graduate from Frederick Douglass High School, the alma mater of civil rights attorney and former Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. McDaniels' graduation date will come 50 years and a month after Marshall, then the chief counsel for the NAACP, won his historic fight to desegregate Douglass and every other public school in America. Marshall argued that integrated schools would offer more academic opportunities for blacks and more social possibilities for both blacks and whites.
NEWS
July 21, 1991
Charles Marbury, retired judge diesServices for retired Court of Appeals Judge Charles C. Marbury will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Trinity Episcopal Church in Upper Marlboro.Judge Marbury, who was 91 and lived on Beacon Hill Farm near Upper Marlboro, died Friday at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington of a respiratory illness.He retired in 1969, when he reached the mandatory retirement age of 70, after more than 28 years as a judge, nine of them on the Court of Appeals.In 1960, when the court was expanded from five judges to seven, he was appointed to fill a seat for a new Southern Maryland Appeals Circuit.
NEWS
April 17, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for retired Army Lt. Col. Paul E. Waters, who taught at the Polytechnic Institute for 11 years, will be offered at 8 p.m. today at Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Church, Liberty Heights Avenue and Edgewood Road. Colonel Waters, who was 72 and lived on Stevenswood Road in Randallstown, died Friday of emphysema at the Baltimore County General Hospital.He taught for a year at Garrison Junior High School before transferring to Baltimore Polytechnic, where he taught history and French.
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