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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Judy Pal, the chief of staff to Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts, is leaving after one year in the position, and sources say Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's former assistant will take her spot. Pal is a communications consultant who had worked in several police departments before her appointment, which was Batts' first personnel move. She began work here on Oct. 1, 2012 and oversaw administrative functions for the department. Pal could not immediately be reached for comment.  Sources with knowledge of the situation said Ganesha Martin, who worked as a special assistant to Rawlings-Blake, will be Pal's replacement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Appearing on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake contrasted her police department's peaceful handling of Occupy Baltimore protesters with the militarized response of police in Ferguson, Mo., where officers fired tear gas and rubber bullets into a crowd.  Rawlings-Blake, who has become a recurring guest on the program, appeared on a panel discussing the civil unrest sweeping in the country after police shot and killed 18-year-old...
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NEWS
January 11, 2011
Officer William Torbit was apparently killed by shots fired from fellow Baltimore City police officers outside a Baltimore nightclub ( "Pair say police shot officer," Jan. 11). These are truly trying times for the police department. It will be incumbent on Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III to keep morale intact. A glaring mistake in judgment was made, but that does not mean the department can take a few days off. Such is the demanding life of public servants. After Officer Torbit is laid to rest with a fitting ceremony, the Baltimore City police have to strike this accident from their collective memory and forge ahead.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
As hundreds walked through Baltimore on Thursday to protest a police shooting in Missouri, uniformed officers were recording their every move. The decision by the Baltimore Police Department to record the march raised questions about how the tapes would be used and why authorities had chosen to record the event. Participants said they saw as many as a dozen officers shadowing the crowds and filming them, almost like a documentary crew, as the protesters walked to the Inner Harbor or spoke with officers.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The Baltimore City Police created a new logo for #ASaferBaltimore social media campaign. In an attempt to be interactive and social media savvy, they asked their Twitter followers what they thought of all the design. Big mistake. "If this were the 80s, I'd say you nailed it," wrote @ TimmyWade94 . Others placed the design in the 1970s or 90s. Several opined that it appeared to be the title sequence of a 90s sitcom, perhaps a sequel to "Perfect Strangers. " Some wondered what the technology the department used to create the logo.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Two families who say they are linked through police brutality filed separate lawsuits against the Baltimore Police Department on Monday, alleging that two officers involved in an in-custody death should not have been on duty. Abdul Salaam, 36, says he was beaten in July 2013 after a traffic stop by Officers Nicholas Chapman and Jorge Bernardez-Ruiz and that he never got a response to his complaint filed with internal affairs. Those officers would be implicated less than three weeks later in the death of 44-year-old Tyrone West while he was in police custody.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
Baltimore police said they were aware of no problems connected to early St. Patrick's Day celebrations Friday night, as they brace for a weekend of boozy revelry once bars open today. The department announced plans to flood bar districts with officers and will have help from state police forces too. They are hoping to avoid a repeat of last year, which saw Canton Square trashed by drinkers and a large group of teenagers fighting downtown. So far, though, things are quiet, according to police, and this evening additional officers will be patrolling the Inner Harbor, Fells Point, Canton and Federal Hill.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
John H. Brown, who headed the Baltimore Police Department's mounted patrol for more than a decade and later became Carroll County sheriff, died Jan. 11 of heart failure at his Uniontown home. He was 85. "He was fair, a gentleman, as were his deputies," said Perry Jones, a former Carroll County commissioner who is now mayor of Union Bridge. "It was a new start for the department when he came to Carroll County, and he was a man who had his own ideas when it came to law enforcement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 15, 2008
James D.M. Muldowney, a retired police officer who had been assigned to the Baltimore Police Department canine unit for nearly 30 years, died Tuesday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Nichols Senior Care in Edgewood. The former longtime Overlea resident was 68. Mr. Muldowney was born and raised in Heckscherville, Pa., and served in the Navy from 1957 to 1961 as an underwater demolitions expert at the naval base in Little Creek, Va. After his discharge from the Navy, Mr.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Joseph W. McLeary, who served with the city Police Department, Maryland State Police and the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency during a more than four-decade career, died Sunday of a massive stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 73. "Joe loved the state police, and he carried that into retirement," said state police spokesman Greg Shipley. "It was obvious that being a state police officer was something that never left him. He even still wore the state police haircut," he said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
An independent panel created to review last year's in-custody death of Tyrone West determined that Baltimore police officers did not use excessive force but made tactical errors that "potentially aggravated the situation" and did not follow basic policies. West, 44, died on July 18, 2013, after police and witnesses said he fought with officers after being pulled over while driving through Northeast Baltimore. West's family has maintained that, based on accounts from witnesses, he was beaten to death by the officers, though an autopsy determined he died because of a heart condition exacerbated by the struggle with police and the summer heat.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
A Baltimore police officer will plead guilty to a felony animal cruelty charge after he fatally beat and choked his girlfriend's Jack Russell terrier, his attorney said Tuesday. Alec Eugene Taylor, 28, a five year veteran of the department was charged in March after the dog's body was exhumed and analyzed by animal services. Taylor's attorney, Warren A. Brown, said his client regretted what he did. Brown blamed the attack on the puppy to the stress of Taylor's work and daily life, a combination that led him to act "in a way that customarily he wouldn't.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
A Baltimore police officer was charged with second-degree assault after prosecutors say he struck a 14-year-old boy who was already apprehended. Baltimore prosecutors charged Baltimore police 14-year veteran Serge Antonin on Tuesday. He is scheduled to be arraigned Aug. 22. He also faces two counts of misconduct, prosecutors said. "We will not tolerate the actions of any officer that breaks the law, in order to enforce the law," Deputy Police Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said in a statement.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Four investigators from agencies outside Baltimore are working to determine who left a dead rat on the car windshield of an officer who was cooperating with prosecutors on a police brutality case. "We're going to go wherever that information takes us," Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts told a City Council committee last week. But an attorney for the whistle-blower officer, Detective Joseph Crystal, believes the efforts are "way too little, way too late" and said the investigation has taken so long that any officers implicated could not be disciplined because the statute of limitations has run out. In a rare move, the investigators working the case were pulled from outside of the city, according to Crystal's attorney, Nick Panteleakis.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
A man was reported to have been shot in the arm Thursday at about 11:30 p.m. near Westwood Avenue and North Bentalou Street in Baltimore's Coppin Heights neighborhood, according to the Baltimore Police Department. Police were investigating the incident early Friday morning. liz.bowie@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Baltimore's police civilian review board has concerns that a new effort to garner input from the board is not meaningful, an official told a City Council committee on Wednesday night.  After years of neglect, the department has been making strides to make the board more relevant, and recently announced that it would refer major use of force investigations, such as police-involved shootings and in-custody deaths, to the board after they were completed....
NEWS
October 28, 2013
In response to a growing body of scientific evidence suggesting that witnesses to crimes often misidentify suspects shown to them in police photo lineups, the Baltimore City Police Department announced recently that is changing the way it conducts the procedure to make it less prone to error. That's a long overdue change that not only brings the department more in line with modern best practices but also makes it less likely that innocent people will be sent to prison for crimes they didn't commit based on faulty witness identifications.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
As hundreds walked through Baltimore on Thursday to protest a police shooting in Missouri, uniformed officers were recording their every move. The decision by the Baltimore Police Department to record the march raised questions about how the tapes would be used and why authorities had chosen to record the event. Participants said they saw as many as a dozen officers shadowing the crowds and filming them, almost like a documentary crew, as the protesters walked to the Inner Harbor or spoke with officers.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Two families who say they are linked through police brutality filed separate lawsuits against the Baltimore Police Department on Monday, alleging that two officers involved in an in-custody death should not have been on duty. Abdul Salaam, 36, says he was beaten in July 2013 after a traffic stop by Officers Nicholas Chapman and Jorge Bernardez-Ruiz and that he never got a response to his complaint filed with internal affairs. Those officers would be implicated less than three weeks later in the death of 44-year-old Tyrone West while he was in police custody.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A second officer has been suspended as the Baltimore Police Department investigates a case in which a dog's throat was slit. Officer Thomas Schmidt, a 24-year veteran assigned to the Emergency Services unit, was placed on paid administrative leave after police say he held down a Shar-Pei while a fellow officer, Jeffrey Bolger, slit the dog's throat. Bolger, a Special Operations Section officer hired by the department in 1992, was released on his own recognizance Thursday morning after being charged the night before with aggravated animal cruelty, animal cruelty and malfeasance in office.
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