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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Judy Pal, the chief of staff to Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts, is leaving after one year in the position, and sources say Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's former assistant will take her spot. Pal is a communications consultant who had worked in several police departments before her appointment, which was Batts' first personnel move. She began work here on Oct. 1, 2012 and oversaw administrative functions for the department. Pal could not immediately be reached for comment.  Sources with knowledge of the situation said Ganesha Martin, who worked as a special assistant to Rawlings-Blake, will be Pal's replacement.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Police named a suspect in the death of Fells Point waitress Claudia Parodi this week and are searching for the man in Texas. Baltimore Police Department spokesman Det. Ruganzu Howard confirmed Saturday that police suspect Juan Morales, 29, in the killing of Parodi, 40, who was found stabbed to death Monday at her Fells Point apartment in the 700 block of S. Bond St. Baltimore investigators told television stations in San Antonio, Texas, they...
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The Baltimore City Police created a new logo for #ASaferBaltimore social media campaign. In an attempt to be interactive and social media savvy, they asked their Twitter followers what they thought of all the design. Big mistake. "If this were the 80s, I'd say you nailed it," wrote @ TimmyWade94 . Others placed the design in the 1970s or 90s. Several opined that it appeared to be the title sequence of a 90s sitcom, perhaps a sequel to "Perfect Strangers. " Some wondered what the technology the department used to create the logo.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
WEATHER Mostly sunny with a high of 68, and a low of 53.   TRAFFIC Get the latest on delays for this morning's commute from baltimoresun.com     FROM LAST NIGHT  Police are searching for a suspect they believe shot his girlfriend's ex-husband with a BB gun at Hereford High School last night.     TODAY'S FRONT PAGE Federal officials announced that they will screen international passengers at five major U.S. airports. A U.S  Department of Justice official promised that his agency's investigation of police brutality in the Baltimore Police Department would be a “candid”  assessment.
NEWS
January 11, 2011
Officer William Torbit was apparently killed by shots fired from fellow Baltimore City police officers outside a Baltimore nightclub ( "Pair say police shot officer," Jan. 11). These are truly trying times for the police department. It will be incumbent on Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III to keep morale intact. A glaring mistake in judgment was made, but that does not mean the department can take a few days off. Such is the demanding life of public servants. After Officer Torbit is laid to rest with a fitting ceremony, the Baltimore City police have to strike this accident from their collective memory and forge ahead.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
Baltimore police said they were aware of no problems connected to early St. Patrick's Day celebrations Friday night, as they brace for a weekend of boozy revelry once bars open today. The department announced plans to flood bar districts with officers and will have help from state police forces too. They are hoping to avoid a repeat of last year, which saw Canton Square trashed by drinkers and a large group of teenagers fighting downtown. So far, though, things are quiet, according to police, and this evening additional officers will be patrolling the Inner Harbor, Fells Point, Canton and Federal Hill.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
John H. Brown, who headed the Baltimore Police Department's mounted patrol for more than a decade and later became Carroll County sheriff, died Jan. 11 of heart failure at his Uniontown home. He was 85. "He was fair, a gentleman, as were his deputies," said Perry Jones, a former Carroll County commissioner who is now mayor of Union Bridge. "It was a new start for the department when he came to Carroll County, and he was a man who had his own ideas when it came to law enforcement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 15, 2008
James D.M. Muldowney, a retired police officer who had been assigned to the Baltimore Police Department canine unit for nearly 30 years, died Tuesday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Nichols Senior Care in Edgewood. The former longtime Overlea resident was 68. Mr. Muldowney was born and raised in Heckscherville, Pa., and served in the Navy from 1957 to 1961 as an underwater demolitions expert at the naval base in Little Creek, Va. After his discharge from the Navy, Mr.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Joseph W. McLeary, who served with the city Police Department, Maryland State Police and the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency during a more than four-decade career, died Sunday of a massive stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 73. "Joe loved the state police, and he carried that into retirement," said state police spokesman Greg Shipley. "It was obvious that being a state police officer was something that never left him. He even still wore the state police haircut," he said.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
In response to a growing body of scientific evidence suggesting that witnesses to crimes often misidentify suspects shown to them in police photo lineups, the Baltimore City Police Department announced recently that is changing the way it conducts the procedure to make it less prone to error. That's a long overdue change that not only brings the department more in line with modern best practices but also makes it less likely that innocent people will be sent to prison for crimes they didn't commit based on faulty witness identifications.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Although Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner have asked the U.S. Department of Justice to review allegations of brutality in the Police Department, some civic leaders called Thursday for a more far-reaching — and hard-hitting — federal investigation. Tessa Hill-Aston, president of the NAACP's Baltimore branch, said the police force needs more than the "collaborative review" that city and federal leaders have agreed upon. If city leaders care about improving the department's relationship with residents, the probe "should be a civil rights investigation," she said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
A Baltimore police officer who authorities say shot a man who attacked him in Middle River last month has been cleared of wrongdoing, Baltimore County police said Thursday. The officer was justified in his actions during the Sept. 20 incident on Red Rose Farm Road, State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger's office said. The officer was identified as Officer Michael Nolan-Anderson by the city police department and by Shellenberger's office. County police say Nolan-Anderson had gotten off work and was driving about 12:30 a.m. when one of two intoxicated men "somehow damaged the mirror on his vehicle.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
The 21-year-old man Baltimore officials had called a suspect in the killing of 3-year-old McKenzie Elliott was released from jail Wednesday after two months without being charged in the fatal shooting. Asked whether the man is still considered a person of interest in the case, the Baltimore Police Department released a statement saying the investigation "has shifted. " "We have substantial leads that we are continuing to follow," the statement read. Officials declined to elaborate.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A U.S. Department of Justice official promised Wednesday that his agency's months-long investigation of police brutality in Baltimore would be a "candid" assessment, and federal lawmakers threw their support behind the probe. Ronald L. Davis, director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, said he met with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts in Arkansas on Wednesday at a U.S. Conference of Mayors event focused on police misconduct.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | October 7, 2014
In Dan Rodricks ' recent column (" Mayor Should Have Seen Troubling Brutality Trend ," Oct. 4) Mr. Rodricks asks a fair question. Noting that I have been a member of the Board of Estimates for the past seven years - both as mayor and City Council president - he asks if I recognized the troubling trend in excessive force court judgments before an article citing years-old cases appeared in The Baltimore Sun. Mr. Rodricks is forgiven for,...
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
As Baltimore Police Department officials prepare for a Department of Justice probe into allegations of brutality, leaders of the local police union criticized the outside scrutiny and said it could make city streets less safe. A host of reforms, along with a strategic plan unveiled last year, shows the department is serious about improving its relationship with the community, Fraternal Order of Police President Robert Cherry said Monday. The new federal scrutinty could make city officers fearful of being second-guessed and lead to ineffective policing, he added.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice will conduct a civil rights investigation into allegations of brutality and misconduct by the Baltimore Police Department, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Batts requested the probe after a six-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun found city residents have suffered battered faces and broken bones during arrests . The city has paid $5.7 million in court judgments and settlements in 102 cases since 2011, and nearly all of the people who received payouts were cleared of criminal charges, according to the investigation published this week.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
A31-year-old Baltimore Police officer was charged Friday with pimping out his wife after officers from a human trafficking task force found him outside a hotel room where the woman had agreed to have sex for cash with an undercover officer. The child recovery task force was working a proactive investigation into human trafficking when they came across a "young-looking female" advertised as an escort on a website, police said. Officers arranged to meet the female at a hotel near BWI airport, court records show.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While hospitalized with a fractured ankle and broken jaw, John Bonkowski reached for his smartphone to find details about the man who beat him outside a parking garage near the Inner Harbor. He typed "Officer Michael McSpadden" into Google. The results stunned Bonkowski. He found references showing that the longtime Baltimore officer had been accused in three separate civil lawsuits: of kicking and stomping a woman, of breaking a man's wrist and of beating a man unconscious with a police baton.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice will conduct a civil rights investigation into allegations of brutality and misconduct by the Baltimore Police Department, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Batts requested the probe after a six-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun found city residents have suffered battered faces and broken bones during arrests . The city has paid $5.7 million in court judgments and settlements in 102 cases since 2011, and nearly all of the people who received payouts were cleared of criminal charges, according to the investigation published this week.
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