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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Judy Pal, the chief of staff to Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts, is leaving after one year in the position, and sources say Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's former assistant will take her spot. Pal is a communications consultant who had worked in several police departments before her appointment, which was Batts' first personnel move. She began work here on Oct. 1, 2012 and oversaw administrative functions for the department. Pal could not immediately be reached for comment.  Sources with knowledge of the situation said Ganesha Martin, who worked as a special assistant to Rawlings-Blake, will be Pal's replacement.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two City Councilmen plan to submit legislation today requiring every police officer in Baltimore to wear a body camera that records audio and video as the officers go about their jobs. Warren Branch, chairman of the council's public safety committee, and Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's proposal would permit the Baltimore Police Department to phase-in use of the body cameras during the first year after the bill, if approved, becomes law. The bill comes amid a series of high-profile allegations of police misconduct in Baltimore and around the country.
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NEWS
January 11, 2011
Officer William Torbit was apparently killed by shots fired from fellow Baltimore City police officers outside a Baltimore nightclub ( "Pair say police shot officer," Jan. 11). These are truly trying times for the police department. It will be incumbent on Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III to keep morale intact. A glaring mistake in judgment was made, but that does not mean the department can take a few days off. Such is the demanding life of public servants. After Officer Torbit is laid to rest with a fitting ceremony, the Baltimore City police have to strike this accident from their collective memory and forge ahead.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Maryland Shock Trauma Center worker was among two people shot to death Sunday night in downtown Baltimore, police and hospital officials said. Surgical-support technician Brandon Finney, 25, and Christopher Camphor, 20, were both killed in the 400 block of W. Saratoga St., about four blocks north of Shock Trauma and just north of Lexington Market. Hospital officials confirmed Finney's death Monday afternoon. "This is a shocking and terrible loss, and we extend our heartfelt thoughts and prayers to his family, friends and colleagues during this extremely difficult time," the hospital said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The Baltimore City Police created a new logo for #ASaferBaltimore social media campaign. In an attempt to be interactive and social media savvy, they asked their Twitter followers what they thought of all the design. Big mistake. "If this were the 80s, I'd say you nailed it," wrote @ TimmyWade94 . Others placed the design in the 1970s or 90s. Several opined that it appeared to be the title sequence of a 90s sitcom, perhaps a sequel to "Perfect Strangers. " Some wondered what the technology the department used to create the logo.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
John H. Brown, who headed the Baltimore Police Department's mounted patrol for more than a decade and later became Carroll County sheriff, died Jan. 11 of heart failure at his Uniontown home. He was 85. "He was fair, a gentleman, as were his deputies," said Perry Jones, a former Carroll County commissioner who is now mayor of Union Bridge. "It was a new start for the department when he came to Carroll County, and he was a man who had his own ideas when it came to law enforcement.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
Baltimore police said they were aware of no problems connected to early St. Patrick's Day celebrations Friday night, as they brace for a weekend of boozy revelry once bars open today. The department announced plans to flood bar districts with officers and will have help from state police forces too. They are hoping to avoid a repeat of last year, which saw Canton Square trashed by drinkers and a large group of teenagers fighting downtown. So far, though, things are quiet, according to police, and this evening additional officers will be patrolling the Inner Harbor, Fells Point, Canton and Federal Hill.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 15, 2008
James D.M. Muldowney, a retired police officer who had been assigned to the Baltimore Police Department canine unit for nearly 30 years, died Tuesday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Nichols Senior Care in Edgewood. The former longtime Overlea resident was 68. Mr. Muldowney was born and raised in Heckscherville, Pa., and served in the Navy from 1957 to 1961 as an underwater demolitions expert at the naval base in Little Creek, Va. After his discharge from the Navy, Mr.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Joseph W. McLeary, who served with the city Police Department, Maryland State Police and the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency during a more than four-decade career, died Sunday of a massive stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 73. "Joe loved the state police, and he carried that into retirement," said state police spokesman Greg Shipley. "It was obvious that being a state police officer was something that never left him. He even still wore the state police haircut," he said.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
In response to a growing body of scientific evidence suggesting that witnesses to crimes often misidentify suspects shown to them in police photo lineups, the Baltimore City Police Department announced recently that is changing the way it conducts the procedure to make it less prone to error. That's a long overdue change that not only brings the department more in line with modern best practices but also makes it less likely that innocent people will be sent to prison for crimes they didn't commit based on faulty witness identifications.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
Even as the Baltimore Police Department faces criticism over its handling of an officer caught on video punching a suspect, an outside audit of the Internal Affairs Division has raised questions about the thoroughness and fairness of the agency's misconduct investigations. A Baltimore lawyer who is a national expert on police discipline discovered "many flaws" within the Internal Affairs Division, including detectives who lack proper training, work under decades-old processes and are often pulled from their duties for other tasks.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Baltimore County police have charged a civilian employee who worked in the department's Criminal Investigation Division after detectives found marijuana in her home Wednesday. Investigators searched the home of Susan M. Burke on Glenback Avenue in Pikesville Wednesday morning, where they found marijuana and drug paraphernalia in the house, police wrote in charging documents. Among the items found were grinders, scales, smoking pipes and a mason jar with plant residue, among other items for marijuana use. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said Burke will be reassigned to another county government position.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
I appreciated the sentiments expressed by letter writer Rosalind Nestor Ellis ( "No to police drones," Sept. 1). We surely do not need a militarization of the Baltimore Police Department. And to be proactive, the Pledge of Resistance-Baltimore has been in touch with a member of the City Council to introduce legislation to control the use of drones in Baltimore. Doing nothing will only exacerbate the problem. Max Obuszewski, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
J. Paul Gahagan, a retired Social Security Administration disability analyst and an accomplished woodworker, died Sunday at College Manor Nursing Home in Lutherville of complications from an infection. He was 87. James Paul Gahagan - he never used his first name, family members said - was born in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore. "He grew up on Aiken Street and had many childhood adventures, including walking over the beams of the Howard Street bridge," said a daughter, Kathy Briggs of Stoneleigh.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Appearing on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake contrasted her police department's peaceful handling of Occupy Baltimore protesters with the militarized response of police in Ferguson, Mo., where officers fired tear gas and rubber bullets into a crowd.  Rawlings-Blake, who has become a recurring guest on the program, appeared on a panel discussing the civil unrest sweeping in the country after police shot and killed 18-year-old...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
As hundreds walked through Baltimore on Thursday to protest a police shooting in Missouri, uniformed officers were recording their every move. The decision by the Baltimore Police Department to record the march raised questions about how the tapes would be used and why authorities had chosen to record the event. Participants said they saw as many as a dozen officers shadowing the crowds and filming them, almost like a documentary crew, as the protesters walked to the Inner Harbor or spoke with officers.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
Even as the Baltimore Police Department faces criticism over its handling of an officer caught on video punching a suspect, an outside audit of the Internal Affairs Division has raised questions about the thoroughness and fairness of the agency's misconduct investigations. A Baltimore lawyer who is a national expert on police discipline discovered "many flaws" within the Internal Affairs Division, including detectives who lack proper training, work under decades-old processes and are often pulled from their duties for other tasks.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Two families who say they are linked through police brutality filed separate lawsuits against the Baltimore Police Department on Monday, alleging that two officers involved in an in-custody death should not have been on duty. Abdul Salaam, 36, says he was beaten in July 2013 after a traffic stop by Officers Nicholas Chapman and Jorge Bernardez-Ruiz and that he never got a response to his complaint filed with internal affairs. Those officers would be implicated less than three weeks later in the death of 44-year-old Tyrone West while he was in police custody.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
An independent panel created to review last year's in-custody death of Tyrone West determined that Baltimore police officers did not use excessive force but made tactical errors that "potentially aggravated the situation" and did not follow basic policies. West, 44, died on July 18, 2013, after police and witnesses said he fought with officers after being pulled over while driving through Northeast Baltimore. West's family has maintained that, based on accounts from witnesses, he was beaten to death by the officers, though an autopsy determined he died because of a heart condition exacerbated by the struggle with police and the summer heat.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
A Baltimore police officer will plead guilty to a felony animal cruelty charge after he fatally beat and choked his girlfriend's Jack Russell terrier, his attorney said Tuesday. Alec Eugene Taylor, 28, a five year veteran of the department was charged in March after the dog's body was exhumed and analyzed by animal services. Taylor's attorney, Warren A. Brown, said his client regretted what he did. Brown blamed the attack on the puppy to the stress of Taylor's work and daily life, a combination that led him to act "in a way that customarily he wouldn't.
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