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By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Household products maker Sun Products Corp. said Tuesday that it will close its nearly 90-year-old Baltimore manufacturing plant in June, laying off almost 300 workers and adding another name to the region's long list of former factories. Production at the plant, which makes fabric softener and liquid detergents such as All, Wisk and Snuggle, will be moved to the company's facility in Bowling Green, Ky. Sun Products cited location - saying Kentucky is closer to its customers - and the age of the Baltimore complex as reasons.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A Jessup-based third party logistics company focused on forest products plans to move to a bigger facility near the Port of Baltimore in October, brokers for the deal said Tuesday. B & E Storage Inc., which started in Columbia in 1985, has increased its ties to the international import-export business, and proximity to the port will allow it to save on fuel, tolls and other costs, said President Greg Williams. The move to the 294,000-square-foot space in Point Breeze Business Center in Baltimore will also allow the 40-employee firm to expand its capacity and hire additional people, he said.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1991
Detroit failed yesterday to make the nearly 4,000 workers at the General Motors Corp. assembly plant in Southeast Baltimore feel like rushing out to buy a new car.But while there were no firm reassurances, the unofficial word is that the minivan plant on Broening Highway is safe, at least for now.GM Chairman Robert C. Stempel said six North American assembly plants would be closed over the next four years, but he didn't identify those on the hit list.Rodney...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A group of Baltimore students are calling on the school board to pull out of its agreement to purchase energy from a planned plant that would burn waste within a mile of two schools in one of the most polluted neighborhoods of the city. Students from Benjamin Franklin High School have reignited a debate over the Fairfield Renewable Energy Project - what the students and environmental advocates consider an incinerator - that was approved in 2010 and would be the largest of its kind in the nation.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | November 1, 1990
The permanent closing of four auto assembly plants contributed to a staggering $1.98 billion third-quarter loss, General Motors Corp. reported yesterday -- amid speculation that its East Baltimore minivan assembly plant could fall victim to consolidation a few years down the road.GM officials attributed one of the biggest quarterly losses ever posted by a U.S. company to a $2.1 billion restructuring charge associated with the shutdown of its assembly plants in Framingham, Mass.; Leeds, Mo.; Pontiac, Mich.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1994
A new study looking at the efficiency of automotive assembly plants might give you the impression that workers at General Motors Corp.'s van plant in Baltimore are sitting down on the job, but a local union representative says that's due to the nature of the work, not the workers.The study, conducted by the Troy, Mich.-based Harbour & Associates Inc., said the Baltimore plant ranks 25th of the 36 truck and van assembly plants in the United States, Canada and Mexico in terms of total factory efficiency.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
When Henry Bert landed a well-paying job at the local GM assembly plant in 1966, he thought he was set for life.Now, at the age of 45, the assembly line worker is not so sure there will be a General Motors plant in Baltimore for the rest of his career.Like thousands of his co-workers at the Broening Highway minivan assembly plant, Mr. Bert was relieved to learn yesterday that Baltimore had escaped the company's latest round of plant closings.Although Baltimore survived this time, Mr. Bert is worried about what's ahead.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
Ending 2 1/2 years of suspense, General Motors Corp. confirmed yesterday that it would continue building minivans in Baltimore, signaling the company's intent to keep the assembly plant open indefinitely.The future of the Baltimore plant and its 3,400 well-paying jobs had been up in the air since the fall of 1990, when GM posted a $2 billion quarterly loss and said it was considering closing more plants to save money.At the time, GM said its Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari vans, which are made here, were due for design changes for the 1996 model year and that it might not continue producing them in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | November 28, 1990
Foreseeing continued depressed automobile sales, the General Motors Corp. said yesterday it will indefinitely lay off 300 of the 3,500 workers at its Broening Highway minivan plant.The layoffs will begin Jan. 22 and may reduce the output of Baltimore's only automobile assembly plant by more than 10 percent, union and management officials said.Philip Frame, who follows the minivan market for the Detroit-based trade publication Automotive News, said he thinks the Baltimore plant is safe from a shutdown but that GM must cut employment because of projections that 1991 will be even worse than 1990 for sales.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
With a helping hand from workers at its van assembly plant here, General Motors Corp. posted the biggest gains in productivity of all North American automotive plants last year, according to a study released yesterday by an automotive research group. Overall, GM's car and truck assembly plants posted a 9.4 percent increase in productivity last year, said the authors of the Harbour Report, a study of the North American auto industry by Harbour & Associates Inc. of Troy, Mich. The Broening Highway plant, which makes the Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari vans, achieved a 4.2 percent increase in productivity,.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Household products maker Sun Products Corp. said Tuesday that it will close its nearly 90-year-old Baltimore manufacturing plant in June, laying off almost 300 workers and adding another name to the region's long list of former factories. Production at the plant, which makes fabric softener and liquid detergents such as All, Wisk and Snuggle, will be moved to the company's facility in Bowling Green, Ky. Sun Products cited location - saying Kentucky is closer to its customers - and the age of the Baltimore complex as reasons.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Water gushes over Domino Sugar's packaging building, washing off grit, fly ash and other gunk - so much of it that the cleaned-up facade is a noticeably lighter shade of brown. The building had plenty of time to collect whatever the weather and long-gone industry threw its way. It's the first time Domino cleaned it in the 25 years refinery manager Stu FitzGibbon has been there, and it's possibly a first since the plant opened in 1922. Domino spent decades focusing its spending on the inner workings of its 25-building Baltimore complex - the parts with a direct impact on refining and transporting sugar.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
The owner of the financially ailing Sparrows Point steel plant is idling operations there, warning 1,975 workers Thursday that they would be laid off starting next month. The news, the latest casting doubt on the future of the Baltimore County facility, came as RG Steel is shopping the steel mill and its other assets to potential buyers. RG Steel informed the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulations that layoffs would begin June 4 and continue through June 18. The state said the company would be laying off 1,714 hourly and 261 salaried workers, losses that would be a significant blow to the economy.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
The Sherwin-Williams Co. has agreed to pay $570,000 to settle alleged hazardous-waste violations at its southwest Baltimore paint plant, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday. EPA cited the Cleveland-based company for illegally storing hazardous wastes, including waste paint, resins and aerosol containers, at its factory in the 2300 block Hollins Ferry Road. A June 2009 inspection found some wastes in damaged, leaking and improperly maintained 55-gallon drums and tanks, according to the EPA. The government accused the company of storing wastes for more than 90 days in violation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, failure to date and properly label the containers, failure to properly close them and keep them from leaking, failure to inspect them regularly and failure to respond immediately to wastes leaking from some rusted or damaged drums.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
A Baltimore County man won an $814,500 judgment in Baltimore County Circuit Court after claiming he contracted a rare lung disease known as "popcorn lung" from breathing a chemical used to make food taste buttery. A jury awarded Brian Hallock $5.4 million last month from Polarome International Inc., a New Jersey-based chemical manufacturer and distributor. But a judge said Friday she would reduce the amount because Maryland has a cap on non-economic damages, Hallock's attorney confirmed Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
As political leaders and corporate officials brandished shovels at a ceremonial groundbreaking Tuesday, Martinez Fernandez mused on the importance of the day: A new General Motors plant would be built in White Marsh, a development that would mean more work, more jobs — and more pride. "This is a good day for GM," said Fernandez, 55, who has worked for the company for 36 years, as have three of his relatives. Before it closed several years ago, Fernandez worked at GM's Baltimore plant on Broening Highway.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
The Sherwin-Williams Co. has agreed to pay $570,000 to settle alleged hazardous-waste violations at its southwest Baltimore paint plant, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday. EPA cited the Cleveland-based company for illegally storing hazardous wastes, including waste paint, resins and aerosol containers, at its factory in the 2300 block Hollins Ferry Road. A June 2009 inspection found some wastes in damaged, leaking and improperly maintained 55-gallon drums and tanks, according to the EPA. The government accused the company of storing wastes for more than 90 days in violation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, failure to date and properly label the containers, failure to properly close them and keep them from leaking, failure to inspect them regularly and failure to respond immediately to wastes leaking from some rusted or damaged drums.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1999
Maryland officials have stepped up their efforts to retain the General Motors Corp.'s Baltimore assembly plant whose future remains in limbo beyond next year.Richard C. Mike Lewin, secretary of the state Department of Business and Economic Development, met with Thomas J. Davis and Guy D. Briggs, two of the top executives of GM's Truck Group, which has jurisdiction over the van plant in Southeast Baltimore.Lewin said the three-hour session at GM's headquarters in Pontiac, Mich., gave them the chance "to educate GM [officials]
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
The United Steelworkers reported Thursday that its members had ratified a new contract with RG Steel, which bought Sparrows Point and two other steel mills earlier this year in a $1.2 billion deal. About 57 percent of the hourly production, maintenance, office and clerical employees at the three facilities — which also include the Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel facility in the Ohio Valley and the former W.C.I. Steel facility in Warren, Ohio — voted for the contract. Mountain State Carbon in Follansbee, W.Va.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
The thick, milky white liquid looks like Elmer's glue, though it's greasy to the touch. It has a sweet, alcohol smell. It's not your father's heating oil, to be sure. But it will do the same job, says Cary J. Claiborne, and a lot more cleanly. Claiborne is president and chief executive officer of New Generation Biofuels, a Florida-based startup that's producing fuel from vegetable and soybean oil at a small production plant it set up this year in southern Baltimore. "It's very biodegradable," Claiborne says as he dips his finger into a small bottle holding a sample of a recent batch.
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