Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaltimore Neighborhoods
IN THE NEWS

Baltimore Neighborhoods

ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
South Baltimore's had a prolific year in nightlife. Barfly's, Barracudas and the Park Bench are just a few of the bars that have popped up. The latest is the Feisty Goat, a sports bar on Key Highway that is as low-key as those other new bars. Open since last month, Feisty Goat is an agreeable sports bar, adequate for sports fans looking for a no-frills atmosphere to watch a game. But, it could use some improvements in service, atmosphere and variety. Located on the first floor of a rowhouse on Key Highway, the bar has the feeling of someone's basement rec room.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
A man died after being shot in the North Baltimore neighborhood of Pen Lucy Thursday afternoon, police said. He was shot about 4:30 p.m. in the 4200 block of Old York Road, said Det. Nicole Monroe, a police spokeswoman. There has been one other homicide in the Pen Lucy neighborhood in the past six months. On June 14, officers found Angelo Maurice Winston lying on the sidewalk in the 600 block of Dumbarton Ave., three blocks south of Thursday's shooting death. Winston, of the 700 block of Cator Ave., walked past a vehicle and was shot by one of its occupants, suffering gunshot wounds to the head, torso and limbs, police said.
NEWS
By Timothy D. Armbruster | August 29, 2011
As the mayoral campaign nears September's primary election, it has been heartening to see an unusually robust debate among the principal candidates about how best to deal with the many economic and social challenges facing Baltimore City. However, whether the topic is an unsustainable property tax rate, crime and the police, the public schools, the environment, jobs and economic development or housing, to some observers two things have been conspicuously absent from the conversation: the recognition by the candidates that these issues are not independent of one another if the ultimate goal is to improve and sustain Baltimore's neighborhoods; and, in that context, what a compelling, cohesive community development strategy for the city would look like.
NEWS
By Barbara Aylesworth | May 11, 2011
The life I experience as a 30-year resident and homeowner in Northeast Baltimore is quite different from the picture painted recently in The Sun. I've worked in community development for 16 years and know the Northeast Baltimore neighborhoods well. I have seen them evolve from quasi-suburban outposts to sought-after places with distinct amenities and some of Baltimore's most interesting people. Yes, the neighborhoods of Ednor Gardens, Belair-Edison, Lauraville, and Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello share the problems of most urban neighborhoods, but these communities are popular homeownership destinations for young families and fertile ground for prosperous new businesses.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
There were hats, of course, straw boaters at the aquarium and Preakness-worthy confections in Mount Vernon. Then there was the quirkier haberdashery, like a purple top hat one man in Federal Hill swept off as he bowed with a flourish when William Donald Schaefer's casket passed by. There were tribal shout-outs — "Edgewood Street!" one guy kept booming, except he wasn't on Edgewood Street but just proud to hail from it — and old campaign buttons and faded photos and, most of all, memories hauled out of the collective basement of a city that almost pathologically hoards them.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 15, 2011
It's hard to believe there may be a day soon when there's no Superfresh in Maryland. I grew up with its corporate parent, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. The A&P seemed to be everywhere, even the little ones with wooden floors and the mechanical coffee grinders adjacent to the Cross Street and Broadway markets. I can see the Art Deco-style bags for the Eight O'Clock, Red Circle and Bokar coffees that were ground as you waited. We had Jane Parker iced Spanish bar cake, Iona canned goods and Ann Page pineapple preserves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
Locust Point was sleepy last Friday night, mostly. Few cars zoomed down Fort Avenue. The sidewalks were empty. The brightest neon sign on the peninsula didn't come from a bar but from the Domino Sugars factory. Music emanated from some bars, but the only noise came from three of us in our 20s walking down the pockmarked sidewalks, past a McDonald's, a strip mall, some warehouses, on a bar crawl in the neighborhood. Locust Point's bar scene got two additions recently — Barracudas and 5 Points — that suggest an infusion of much-needed new blood.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
A variety of Baltimore neighborhoods ended the roller-coaster ride of the past decade with significantly higher home values than at the start, but some communities saw all the gains of the housing bubble erased by the bust. That's the conclusion of a group of Johns Hopkins University graduate students who analyzed how the turbulent 2000s affected a mix of low-, moderate- and high-income areas in the city. Two recessions, a financial crisis and a housing run-up followed by collapse did not hit every neighborhood equally.
NEWS
By Tina Carroll | September 14, 2010
For residents involved in legislation regarding Baltimore's proposed 25th Street Station shopping center, the process has been a disappointing one. There was the promise that "this is not a done deal," but during community presentations by the developers, the tone was one of "here's what we've done" rather than "here's what we can do for you. " Communication from Councilwoman Belinda Conaway, in whose district the 25th Street Station project is...
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Concern over crime against Latinos, already simmering in Baltimore as a result of several attacks in recent weeks, has reached new heights after the fatal beating over the weekend of a 51-year-old man from Honduras. Martin Reyes — whose killing early Saturday was attributed by police to a mentally troubled man who said he hated "Mexicans" — was the fifth Latino shooting or homicide victim in the area in less than two months, officials said. All the victims were Honduran, according to residents, and one was Reyes' nephew, Juan de Dios Hernandez, 27, who was shot in the forehead July 24. "We're afraid that they're trying to finish off the Hispanics," said Anibal Rodriguez, 30, a Honduran laborer who moved to Baltimore five years ago and who was sitting Monday morning on steps of a house across Kenwood Avenue from where Reyes died.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.