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NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A Taneytown man has agreed to pay $5,500, attend counseling sessions and perform community service as part of a settlement of a complaint that he threatened a local real estate agent to prevent a sale to black homebuyers.Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing advocacy group, filed the complaint with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, contending Allan M. Roberts swore and used racial slurs when he confronted real estate agent Jackie E. Robertson in July and October 1998.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 22, 1991
As we live in a time of general mistrust between some people of different skin color, we come now to the legal matter of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. vs. the Sterling Homes Corp. and its advertising firm, Jordan-Azzam Inc.Baltimore Neighborhoods fights discrimination in housing, real and perceived. Sterling Homes is a builder of houses, including some $90,000 town houses in an Anne Arundel County development called Stoney Beach, which had no complaints of discrimination until recent business involving newspaper advertising.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | November 20, 1999
This weekend's arrival "Liberty Heights," the new Barry Levinson film, reminds me of my own connection with that name. As a child of 1950s Baltimore, I too was dazzled by the array of totally different neighborhoods and peoples that all came under the shared address of Baltimore.I first got to know the name Liberty Heights from the telephone exchange, specifically that of Pimlico race track, L-I-B-four-two hundred, as my mother dialed it, always phonetically. My father's desk -- then as today -- was there.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1996
O'Conor, Piper & Flynn set sales record of 1,314 homes in AprilO'Conor, Piper & Flynn set a sales record in April, selling 1,314 homes last month. That was more than in any April in the company's history, according to James P. O'Conor, chairman and chief executive officer of the Timonium-based firm.April's sales were up 38.8 percent over the same month in 1995. This follows a record March for OPF.Workshop scheduled for home renovatorsA workshop for those who want to renovate old homes will be held Saturday, May 18, at the Orchard Street Church, 512 Orchard St.Renovator's Roundtable '96 is being presented by the Maryland Association of Historic District Commissions.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
A Baltimore housing group that polices the federal Fair Housing Act has reached a $75,000 settlement with a Baltimore County developer accused in a lawsuit of failing to make its new condominiums accessible to disabled people.Martin A. Dyer, associate director of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., said the federal suit was filed last year on behalf of two disabled condo owners at Falls Gable Condominiums, inside the Baltimore Beltway near Old Pimlico Road and the Jones Falls Expressway.Dyer said one condo owner had no accessible pathway for wheelchairs to her apartment, as required by federal law. In another unit, he said, an owner who uses a walker could not fully use the bathroom because the door and shower stall are too small.
NEWS
August 5, 1993
Today's low interest rates are scant consolation to would-be homeowners who simply do not have enough cash to pay the closing costs. Those costs -- which include one full year's property taxes as well as points and transfer and recordation fees -- are particularly high in Baltimore City.Late last year the municipal government earmarked $2.5 million for a program in which purchasers of homes costing $60,000 to $100,000 can borrow up to $5,000 for closing costs. The Neighborhood Housing Services of Baltimore is now taking the idea further by offering similar closing-cost loans for less expensive homes.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | March 12, 1992
IT HAS BEEN 25 years, a quarter of a liberating century, since President Johnson on Feb. 15, 1967, sent to Congress the Civil Rights Act of 1967, with its special emphasis on ending discrimination in housing by 1969.It did not end in 1969. It has not ended today.According to a recent nationwide study by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) of the home-seeking experiences of blacks and Hispanics, illegal discrimination is still widely practiced throughout the United States.
NEWS
January 25, 1991
An 18-year-old Baltimore County law banning real estate agents from soliciting the purchase or sale of residences in person, by telephone or by mass circulars has been struck down. "Since the practice of blockbusting no longer exists in Baltimore County, Sec. 14-26 cannot now directly further the governmental interest by combating blockbusting, 'panic selling' or 'white flight'," wrote U.S. District Court Judge Alexander Harvey.Are "panic selling" and "white flight" gone?Perhaps. But Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. alleges in a pending suit that one Baltimore County real estate firm recently steered a black couple away from largely white Mount Washington toward predominantly black neighborhoods, while white house-hunters were told houses in comparable price ranges in Mount Washington were available.
NEWS
February 7, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley recently announced plans for the city to take over about 5,000 of the tens of thousands of vacant properties that blight many Baltimore neighborhoods. What do you think the city should do with its abandoned properties? We are looking for 300 words or less; the deadline is Feb. 18. Letters become the property of The Sun, which reserves the right to edit them. By submitting a letter, the author grants The Sun an irrevocable, non-exclusive right and license to use and republish the letter, in whole or in part, in all media and to authorize others to reprint it. Letters should include your name and address, along with a day and evening telephone number.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 4, 2002
Trouble in a feeder line was blamed for a power blackout last night that affected nearly 2,000 Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers in southern Baltimore neighborhoods, a spokesman for the utility said. The problem occurred shortly after 9 p.m. when an underground feeder line at William Street, near Key Highway, failed for an unknown reason, said BGE spokesman Arthur Liebno. An employee of Hartlove's, a tavern in the 600 block of E. Fort Ave., said it was still without electricity at 10:30 p.m. But across the street, a barmaid at Captain Larry's said it was not affected.
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