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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2001
He's about to leave his patient's home (yes, some doctors still make house calls), but first Dr. Lloyd T. Bowser Jr. wants to stop and contemplate his foot. Not his own foot, of course. A plastic model that the Baltimore podiatrist takes with him to help answer patients' questions and explain his diagnoses. "The foot," he announces, "really is a biomechanical wonder." Now he's ready to go, on his way out the door, but there's another pause. There is something he wants to know. "Are those greens you got cooking?"
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
Frankly fake but authentically Baltimore, the Formstone that swaths many a rowhouse may seem low-brow or even tacky to some. But should it be illegal? A proposed overhaul of the Baltimore's zoning code would do just that, banning the faux stone facades on any newly constructed rowhouses. While the city says this would upgrade neighborhoods, some see it as a slap at an endearing if downscale bit of Baltimoreana - akin to prohibiting Natty Boh at the corner bar or beehive hairdos at the beauty parlor.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Federal officials have extended a regulatory waiver that makes it easier to "flip" properties - a move meant to encourage the renovation of foreclosed homes but that critics say could herald the return of predatory schemes. The Federal Housing Administration has waived through 2014 an anti-flipping regulation, which had prevented the agency from insuring mortgages on properties sold within 90 days of acquisition. The waiver, first implemented in 2010 to bolster the flagging housing market, is intended to enable investors to buy and quickly rehab properties as the market continues to struggle.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | May 7, 2012
A survey of 549 community-based organizations suggests that housing discrimination is on the rise, particularly targeting disabled individuals, immigrants, minorities and families with children, according to the nonprofit Consumer Action . Locally, Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. has said it found similar problems. The organizations, which has sent “testers” out in the region to inquire about available housing, filed suit last year and in 2010 over alleged discrimination.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1999
A Baltimore nonprofit group that fights racial discrimination in housing has sued the owner of a Ruxton apartment complex, alleging that African-Americans posing as prospective renters were turned away, while whites were offered apartments.Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. sued the owner of Ruxton Village Apartments in U.S. District Court in Baltimore Thursday, accusing the apartment owners of violating the federal Fair Housing Act of 1968.The suit was filed after black and white Baltimore Neighborhoods "testers" requested apartments on the same day and were told different stories about their availability.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
A Harford County developer lied to prospective black homebuyers to keep them out of a new development in Bel Air, a federal racial discrimination lawsuit filed yesterday charges.A sales agent for Stephen Homes Inc., the suit alleges, deliberately tried to keep blacks from buying at the Greenridge II development in Bel Air.Jonathan Pumphrey, a black hospital administrator with a wife ,, and two children, wanted to move off a noisy Bel Air street and buy a new $170,000 home at Greenridge II in January, said Andrew D. Freeman, a Baltimore attorney representing Mr. Pumphrey.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
A Delaware company has agreed to pay $250,000 to settle charges of racial steering after its real estate agents selectively showed homes to potential black and white buyers in Randallstown, Owings Mills and Pikesville.Fine Homes, a limited partnership that once owned a Baltimore real estate company, agreed yesterday to settle a 1990 lawsuit filed by Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing group.The suit alleged that Fine Homes agents steered black customers away from predominantly white neighborhoods in Baltimore County northwest of the city and that whites were steered away from predominantly black and integrated neighborhoods along the Liberty Road corridor.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | January 6, 1994
The bell in the stone tower at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church tolled yesterday morning for a man named Robert McCoy. Just a week earlier, the same bronze bell sounded through the cold winter air recalling the life of his wife, Lynne.Robert McCoy died Jan. 2 of a lingering liver ailment. Lynne McCoy was the real estate agent who was slain Dec. 21 as she showed a prospective customer a home. Her husband's death had been anticipated; hers was not. Her loss is spoken of daily from house to house throughout the West Baltimore neighborhoods where the McCoys were so much a part of the landscape.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1998
Many people in North Baltimore have come to think of Sandra R. Sparks as indispensable, but this week they accept the fact that after nine years, her days as executive director of Greater Homewood Community Corp. have come to an end.Under Sparks' leadership, the umbrella organization of 35 North Baltimore neighborhoods -- as diverse as Barclay and Hampden and Guilford -- has blossomed into one of the city's most innovative nonprofit groups."We have finally [built] a volunteer base from all of Greater Homewood, the whole of North Baltimore from Penn Station to the city line," said Sparks over lunch at Morgan Millard restaurant in Roland Park.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A Taneytown man has agreed to pay $5,500, attend counseling sessions and perform community service as part of a settlement of a complaint that he threatened a local real estate agent to prevent a sale to black homebuyers.Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing advocacy group, filed the complaint with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, contending Allan M. Roberts swore and used racial slurs when he confronted real estate agent Jackie E. Robertson in July and October 1998.
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