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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
Andy York recently bought a T-shirt that captures how he feels about his city. The design includes various implements of violence that include brass knuckles, a switchblade, a noose and a brick in the shape of a heart. "It all comes down to self-deprecating humor," said York, a Pigtown resident who plans to wear the tee to live music events or festivals. "I would be really upset if someone from Pittsburgh was wearing a shirt like that. " Elected officials and tourism industry leaders have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars developing slogans to emphasize Baltimore's finer points.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
When the first customers enter Under Armour's new Brand House in Harbor East Saturday morning, they'll have little choice but to think "Baltimore. " The shirts displayed at the front of the store promote Baltimore neighborhoods such as Fells Point and Canton and sport iconic symbols like Mr. Boh. Banners next to the main entrance honor NFL great Ray Lewis and the Ravens. Swimmer Michael Phelps adorns the side of the building facing the water. Inside, there are vintage-style shirts with crabs and others showing the outline of a Raven image with famous city streets and places spelled within.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1999
A Baltimore nonprofit group that fights racial discrimination in housing has sued the owner of a Ruxton apartment complex, alleging that African-Americans posing as prospective renters were turned away, while whites were offered apartments.Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. sued the owner of Ruxton Village Apartments in U.S. District Court in Baltimore Thursday, accusing the apartment owners of violating the federal Fair Housing Act of 1968.The suit was filed after black and white Baltimore Neighborhoods "testers" requested apartments on the same day and were told different stories about their availability.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,Sun Staff | February 27, 2000
Clayton Guyton leans his sturdy body against a rowhouse at Rose Street and Ashland Avenue, looking carefully down the block for signs of trouble. Shots ring out nearby: Crack! Crack! Crack! Then a reply: Pop! Pop! Pop! Pop! Guyton hardly flinches. He steps forward, onto the corner, joined by three armed companions. It is early December. Just days after the execution-style killing of five women in a rowhouse one mile away. Just hours since one of the suspects was caught by police less than 100 yards from Rose and Ashland and another was found nearby, his throat slashed ear to ear. Rumors of retaliation, that an all-out gang war could engulf the neighborhood, are flying.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
A Harford County developer lied to prospective black homebuyers to keep them out of a new development in Bel Air, a federal racial discrimination lawsuit filed yesterday charges.A sales agent for Stephen Homes Inc., the suit alleges, deliberately tried to keep blacks from buying at the Greenridge II development in Bel Air.Jonathan Pumphrey, a black hospital administrator with a wife ,, and two children, wanted to move off a noisy Bel Air street and buy a new $170,000 home at Greenridge II in January, said Andrew D. Freeman, a Baltimore attorney representing Mr. Pumphrey.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
A Delaware company has agreed to pay $250,000 to settle charges of racial steering after its real estate agents selectively showed homes to potential black and white buyers in Randallstown, Owings Mills and Pikesville.Fine Homes, a limited partnership that once owned a Baltimore real estate company, agreed yesterday to settle a 1990 lawsuit filed by Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing group.The suit alleged that Fine Homes agents steered black customers away from predominantly white neighborhoods in Baltimore County northwest of the city and that whites were steered away from predominantly black and integrated neighborhoods along the Liberty Road corridor.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A Taneytown man has agreed to pay $5,500, attend counseling sessions and perform community service as part of a settlement of a complaint that he threatened a local real estate agent to prevent a sale to black homebuyers.Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing advocacy group, filed the complaint with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, contending Allan M. Roberts swore and used racial slurs when he confronted real estate agent Jackie E. Robertson in July and October 1998.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
While your recent editorial ("A great investment," Oct. 10) is critical of the efforts made by opponents of the Dream Act, I would encourage you not to overlook the efforts being made by Dream Act supporters. The Intersection is a non-profit organization in Baltimore that empowers high school students to have ownership in improving their communities. The students of The Intersection, having completed a rigorous training program, seek to make a difference. In doing so, they have focused their efforts on passing the Dream Act. Students from The Intersection have talked with their peers, canvassed Baltimore neighborhoods, and pushed their communities to spread the word and garner support.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 22, 1991
As we live in a time of general mistrust between some people of different skin color, we come now to the legal matter of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. vs. the Sterling Homes Corp. and its advertising firm, Jordan-Azzam Inc.Baltimore Neighborhoods fights discrimination in housing, real and perceived. Sterling Homes is a builder of houses, including some $90,000 town houses in an Anne Arundel County development called Stoney Beach, which had no complaints of discrimination until recent business involving newspaper advertising.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2001
He's about to leave his patient's home (yes, some doctors still make house calls), but first Dr. Lloyd T. Bowser Jr. wants to stop and contemplate his foot. Not his own foot, of course. A plastic model that the Baltimore podiatrist takes with him to help answer patients' questions and explain his diagnoses. "The foot," he announces, "really is a biomechanical wonder." Now he's ready to go, on his way out the door, but there's another pause. There is something he wants to know. "Are those greens you got cooking?"
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