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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
A Harford County developer lied to prospective black homebuyers to keep them out of a new development in Bel Air, a federal racial discrimination lawsuit filed yesterday charges.A sales agent for Stephen Homes Inc., the suit alleges, deliberately tried to keep blacks from buying at the Greenridge II development in Bel Air.Jonathan Pumphrey, a black hospital administrator with a wife ,, and two children, wanted to move off a noisy Bel Air street and buy a new $170,000 home at Greenridge II in January, said Andrew D. Freeman, a Baltimore attorney representing Mr. Pumphrey.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Tipped that Darryl Martin Anderson's year on the run had taken him to Birmingham, Ala., U.S. Marshals set up outside an apartment complex Wednesday morning and watched as his car and its Maryland plates backed into a parking space and an unknown man walked inside. Marshals could see people inside the apartment peeking out through the blinds at them as they prepared to rush in. A woman emerged and said Anderson wasn't inside. But within moments, the 25-year-old man Baltimore police had dubbed "Public Enemy No. 1" appeared with his hands up. After Anderson emerged, with his distinctive dreadlocks and forehead tattoos, police say they found a .40-caliber Glock and two bulletproof vests inside.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A Taneytown man has agreed to pay $5,500, attend counseling sessions and perform community service as part of a settlement of a complaint that he threatened a local real estate agent to prevent a sale to black homebuyers.Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing advocacy group, filed the complaint with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, contending Allan M. Roberts swore and used racial slurs when he confronted real estate agent Jackie E. Robertson in July and October 1998.
NEWS
November 22, 1993
Monday's obituary of Eva Maria Souweine should have listed two surviving daughters, Rachel Souweine and Kathleen Souweine of Cockeysville. The Sun regrets the error.Eva Maria SouweineSpecial education teacherEva Maria Souweine, a Cockeysville resident and former special education teacher in Baltimore City and Baltimore County schools, died of cancer Friday at the National Institutes of Health in Washington. She was 42.Mrs. Souweine last taught at Joppa View Elementary in 1991. She had lived in Cockeysville for eight years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
Stanley I. Panitz, a former real estate developer whose Bolton Square town house community earned him national recognition, died Monday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Springwell Senior Living in Mount Washington. The Roland Park resident was 88. "Stan was a lovely, dear man who did so much for Baltimore and the Baltimore metro area. He loved both his family and his community," said Shale D. Stiller, a longtime friend who is a partner at DLA Piper and former president and trustee of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 22, 1991
As we live in a time of general mistrust between some people of different skin color, we come now to the legal matter of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. vs. the Sterling Homes Corp. and its advertising firm, Jordan-Azzam Inc.Baltimore Neighborhoods fights discrimination in housing, real and perceived. Sterling Homes is a builder of houses, including some $90,000 town houses in an Anne Arundel County development called Stoney Beach, which had no complaints of discrimination until recent business involving newspaper advertising.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1998
Many people in North Baltimore have come to think of Sandra R. Sparks as indispensable, but this week they accept the fact that after nine years, her days as executive director of Greater Homewood Community Corp. have come to an end.Under Sparks' leadership, the umbrella organization of 35 North Baltimore neighborhoods -- as diverse as Barclay and Hampden and Guilford -- has blossomed into one of the city's most innovative nonprofit groups."We have finally [built] a volunteer base from all of Greater Homewood, the whole of North Baltimore from Penn Station to the city line," said Sparks over lunch at Morgan Millard restaurant in Roland Park.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | November 20, 1999
This weekend's arrival "Liberty Heights," the new Barry Levinson film, reminds me of my own connection with that name. As a child of 1950s Baltimore, I too was dazzled by the array of totally different neighborhoods and peoples that all came under the shared address of Baltimore.I first got to know the name Liberty Heights from the telephone exchange, specifically that of Pimlico race track, L-I-B-four-two hundred, as my mother dialed it, always phonetically. My father's desk -- then as today -- was there.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1996
O'Conor, Piper & Flynn set sales record of 1,314 homes in AprilO'Conor, Piper & Flynn set a sales record in April, selling 1,314 homes last month. That was more than in any April in the company's history, according to James P. O'Conor, chairman and chief executive officer of the Timonium-based firm.April's sales were up 38.8 percent over the same month in 1995. This follows a record March for OPF.Workshop scheduled for home renovatorsA workshop for those who want to renovate old homes will be held Saturday, May 18, at the Orchard Street Church, 512 Orchard St.Renovator's Roundtable '96 is being presented by the Maryland Association of Historic District Commissions.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
A Baltimore housing group that polices the federal Fair Housing Act has reached a $75,000 settlement with a Baltimore County developer accused in a lawsuit of failing to make its new condominiums accessible to disabled people.Martin A. Dyer, associate director of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., said the federal suit was filed last year on behalf of two disabled condo owners at Falls Gable Condominiums, inside the Baltimore Beltway near Old Pimlico Road and the Jones Falls Expressway.Dyer said one condo owner had no accessible pathway for wheelchairs to her apartment, as required by federal law. In another unit, he said, an owner who uses a walker could not fully use the bathroom because the door and shower stall are too small.
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