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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
Andy York recently bought a T-shirt that captures how he feels about his city. The design includes various implements of violence that include brass knuckles, a switchblade, a noose and a brick in the shape of a heart. "It all comes down to self-deprecating humor," said York, a Pigtown resident who plans to wear the tee to live music events or festivals. "I would be really upset if someone from Pittsburgh was wearing a shirt like that. " Elected officials and tourism industry leaders have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars developing slogans to emphasize Baltimore's finer points.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
Hundreds of residents have been relocated and dozens of homes cleared from Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood in recent years. Now the area just north of Johns Hopkins Hospital may be losing something more: its name. As an ambitious redevelopment project with biotech research labs, corporate offices and homes reshapes the neighborhood, the area is being marketed around the yet-to-be-built Eager Park - a strategy that upsets some longtime residents. "They want it to sound like there's no history here until they got here," said Donald Gresham, a leader of the now-defunct Save Middle East Action Committee, created more than a decade ago to oppose the displacement of residents.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A Taneytown man has agreed to pay $5,500, attend counseling sessions and perform community service as part of a settlement of a complaint that he threatened a local real estate agent to prevent a sale to black homebuyers.Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing advocacy group, filed the complaint with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, contending Allan M. Roberts swore and used racial slurs when he confronted real estate agent Jackie E. Robertson in July and October 1998.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
Vacant lots transformed into gardens and playgrounds are bright spots in Baltimore neighborhoods - places for residents to talk, play and even grow food. But the people who clean, plant and tend these plots often have no guarantee that their hard work will not be cleared to make way for development. Now the city has crafted a procedure for residents to permanently claim open spaces. Under a plan approved by the city's spending board yesterday, community groups that nurture a vacant lot for five years will be able to form a land trust to buy the plot for a nominal fee from the city.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
While your recent editorial ("A great investment," Oct. 10) is critical of the efforts made by opponents of the Dream Act, I would encourage you not to overlook the efforts being made by Dream Act supporters. The Intersection is a non-profit organization in Baltimore that empowers high school students to have ownership in improving their communities. The students of The Intersection, having completed a rigorous training program, seek to make a difference. In doing so, they have focused their efforts on passing the Dream Act. Students from The Intersection have talked with their peers, canvassed Baltimore neighborhoods, and pushed their communities to spread the word and garner support.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 22, 1991
As we live in a time of general mistrust between some people of different skin color, we come now to the legal matter of Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. vs. the Sterling Homes Corp. and its advertising firm, Jordan-Azzam Inc.Baltimore Neighborhoods fights discrimination in housing, real and perceived. Sterling Homes is a builder of houses, including some $90,000 town houses in an Anne Arundel County development called Stoney Beach, which had no complaints of discrimination until recent business involving newspaper advertising.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
When the first customers enter Under Armour's new Brand House in Harbor East Saturday morning, they'll have little choice but to think "Baltimore. " The shirts displayed at the front of the store promote Baltimore neighborhoods such as Fells Point and Canton and sport iconic symbols like Mr. Boh. Banners next to the main entrance honor NFL great Ray Lewis and the Ravens. Swimmer Michael Phelps adorns the side of the building facing the water. Inside, there are vintage-style shirts with crabs and others showing the outline of a Raven image with famous city streets and places spelled within.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1996
O'Conor, Piper & Flynn set sales record of 1,314 homes in AprilO'Conor, Piper & Flynn set a sales record in April, selling 1,314 homes last month. That was more than in any April in the company's history, according to James P. O'Conor, chairman and chief executive officer of the Timonium-based firm.April's sales were up 38.8 percent over the same month in 1995. This follows a record March for OPF.Workshop scheduled for home renovatorsA workshop for those who want to renovate old homes will be held Saturday, May 18, at the Orchard Street Church, 512 Orchard St.Renovator's Roundtable '96 is being presented by the Maryland Association of Historic District Commissions.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | November 20, 1999
This weekend's arrival "Liberty Heights," the new Barry Levinson film, reminds me of my own connection with that name. As a child of 1950s Baltimore, I too was dazzled by the array of totally different neighborhoods and peoples that all came under the shared address of Baltimore.I first got to know the name Liberty Heights from the telephone exchange, specifically that of Pimlico race track, L-I-B-four-two hundred, as my mother dialed it, always phonetically. My father's desk -- then as today -- was there.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Federal officials have extended a regulatory waiver that makes it easier to "flip" properties - a move meant to encourage the renovation of foreclosed homes but that critics say could herald the return of predatory schemes. The Federal Housing Administration has waived through 2014 an anti-flipping regulation, which had prevented the agency from insuring mortgages on properties sold within 90 days of acquisition. The waiver, first implemented in 2010 to bolster the flagging housing market, is intended to enable investors to buy and quickly rehab properties as the market continues to struggle.
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