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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Among Baltimore's neighborhoods, the hip community of Hampden is forecast to see the most home value appreciation this year, according to data-driven real estate search website Zillow. Home values in that North Baltimore district should see a 4.2 percent increase over the next 12 months, according to a report the firm recently released. Zillow considers an annual appreciation of about 3 percent to be the national norm. Locust Point and Highlandtown are tied for second place in the Baltimore forecast.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
It began with a bathroom renovation and ended with a toilet race Saturday at Hampdenfest. Lisa Harbin and Bob Atkinson redid a bathroom in their Baltimore house this year, and what else could they do with their old toilet but mount it on a board between two bikes and roll it down Chestnut Street with crowds cheering and the toilet paper rolls on their bike swirling. With perfect late September weather and crowds that filled The Avenue for blocks, Hampdenfest went on a week later than usual but with fun, food and everything quintessentially Hampden.
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BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | May 18, 2012
Baltimore has a gem online that's worth exploring for a few minutes the next time you're info-snacking on the web. CityView is Baltimore's online database that lets you plug in your address, or any other address you're interested in, and search for crab houses that are nearby, local food trucks or libraries within walking distance. The site is a map-based portal that plots addresses by neighborhood. The city bills the site as being useful for residents, visitors, researchers and businessmen and women.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
On Wednesday, Baltimore will relaunch its publicly owned TV station, shifting its focus from broadcasts of government meetings to CharmTV, a showcase for city restaurants, businesses and neighborhoods. City leaders see an opportunity to counteract negative perceptions of Baltimore, but with the change come questions about significantly increased spending on an untested business model - without benefit of data to show how many people watch the station. An extensive publicity campaign from the Mayor's Office of Cable and Communications promises a fresh slate of four locally produced prime-time programs equal in quality to those seen on the Food Network or HGTV, showcasing "all that is proud, inspiring and authentic" about Baltimore food, nightlife, neighborhoods and history.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS | January 11, 2008
What can you do if the heater in the apartment you're renting conks out and your landlord won't fix it? Or if you're facing eviction? Or, for that matter, if you're a landlord with a nightmare tenant? A local group has answers. Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a nonprofit that works statewide, counsels renters and rental owners alike. "The majority of the calls we get on a regular basis, day to day, are rent court issues," said Stephanie D. Cornish, program manager for the tenant-landlord counseling department.
NEWS
June 10, 1995
If vacant houses and "For Sale" signs are barometers of a city's underlying stability and health, then many Baltimore neighborhoods are in alarming shape. The next mayor will likely preside over a demolition of whole city blocks -- unless the trend can be reversed.The causes of this situation are both simple and complex. In the past four decades, Baltimore's population has plummeted by 250,000 to an estimated 700,000. Many middle-class families have moved to the surrounding counties in search of more space, less crime and better schools.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | February 19, 2005
GRAY FEBRUARY days aren't ideal for looking at Baltimore real estate, but then again, my father and I were not buyers. He had heard about, as had I, a row of houses being constructed on Race Street in South Baltimore. We were both curious. So, that afternoon, after a big family gathering at his boyhood home on Poultney Street, we took off in search of the $500,000 rowhouses being built along the CSX tracks. The price of rowhouses in what is called Federal Hill always amazes us. But that's nothing new now. We looked the group over and he observed the site at least was free of the natural gas tanks that once stood not so far away from the new kitchens in these pricey abodes.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair housing advocacy group, has opened an office in Carroll County to monitor inequities in home rentals and sales."Our only agenda is to see that fair housing laws are followed," said Patricia Staples, outreach coordinator. "We cannot change negative attitudes, but if landlords or home sellers are breaking the law, we can do something."The private, nonprofit organization, which was started in Baltimore nearly 40 years ago, uses testers -- who assume the role of homebuyers or renters -- to help judge the local housing market.
NEWS
June 2, 1997
THE WHOLESALE ABANDONMENT of marginal rowhouses in many Baltimore neighborhoods is easy to describe and decry. Coming up with solutions is far more difficult. The Citizens Planning and Housing Association is now trying to figure out novel answers. So is city Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson, who is enlisting a Yale University think-tank to help.There is much the city and the private sector can do. But none of that will be easy politically or racially. The unavoidable truth is that some neighborhoods are going to die. People just will not want to live in them because they are either too unsafe or their aging housing stock has outlived its usefulness.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2002
Tracy Gosson was everywhere yesterday, electronic megaphone in hand as she called out departures for the vans hired to carry prospective homeowners on tours of Baltimore neighborhoods. "I don't care what the census says. People want to move [into] Baltimore," said Gosson, director of the Live Baltimore Marketing Center. "This is not three years ago. There are very positive attitudes about the city." Yesterday's "Buying Into Baltimore Fair" gave the nonprofit agency another chance to showcase the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
For Lawrence Peterson, the redevelopment of his Mount Vernon neighborhood was every bit as much of a calling as his 20 years in the U.S. Navy. As friends and neighbors paid tribute to the "Mayor of Mount Vernon" on Sunday evening, they recalled a man so passionate about their area of the city that he would drop in to invite neighbors over or nudge them to clean up their front stoops. The community leader died Friday, two years after he was critically injured in a shooting near the Belvedere Hotel on the first block of East Chase Street, where he lived with his husband, Tom Sabia.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 16, 2014
The old-fashioned corner store is thriving on a quiet Southeast Baltimore cross street. The neighborhood institution has been repurposed as the Highlandtown Gallery, a place where local artists show their works in a well-lighted, clean place within an atmospheric Baltimore neighborhood. At the corner of Gough and Conkling, two blocks north of busy Eastern Avenue, the gallery has some traditional neighbors — a corner bar (the Laughing Pint), a funeral home (Joseph Zannino), a Roman Catholic church (Our Lady of Pompei)
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | February 11, 2014
Baltimore still has a lot of work to do, but our city has much more for which to be grateful. The State of the City address is an opportunity to update citizens on what government is doing to confront our most immediate challenges, but also to take stock of our progress in tackling systemic problems that have been around for decades. There is no more immediate challenge in Baltimore than our fight against violent crime. While progress has been made in reducing assaults, robberies, rapes and overall violent crime, our homicide rate remains far too high.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | February 11, 2014
The longtime head of Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, who oversaw its fight to protect the city's old structures for more than three decades, announced her retirement Tuesday. Kathleen Kotarba, a 1975 graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, began her 38-year tenure in city government in 1974 and has served as CHAP's executive director since 1981. During that time, the commission named 21 of the city's 33 historic districts, identified 127 of the roughly 180 Baltimore City landmarks, restored the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, established a popular city tax credit for historic restoration and launched a program focused on conservation of the city's monuments, among other achievements.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
A fire that ravaged a home in North Baltimore's upscale Roland Park neighborhood Thursday afternoon has resulted in severe damage that is expected to cost more than $1 million, Baltimore Fire Department officials said. Firefighters battled the raging fire and challenging conditions at a home in the 1000 block of Saint Georges Road. With frigid temperatures at play, the fire was escalated to a third alarm around 5 p.m. Baltimore Fire Department spokesman Ian Brennan said two hydrants on the road froze, but added that crews worked around the issue.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
For decades, residents in the Midway neighborhood in East Baltimore have dealt with fumes, noise and the less-than-pleasing aesthetics of a major bus depot in their backyards. On Tuesday, federal, state and local officials gathered in the neighborhood in the rain to promote a $140 million investment to replace the Maryland Transit Administration's aged Kirk Avenue facility — aiming to revitalize the neighborhood in the process. "We're going to be a better neighbor to the community we're in," said Robert Smith, administrator of the MTA, which stores and maintains about 175 buses at the site.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2009
Salary: $84,000 Age: 55 Time on the job: 15 months How he got started: After moving from Detroit to Baltimore to take a teaching position, Doran found that his job had been given to a recently laid-off teacher. So instead he went to work for a nonprofit organization as its director of camping and recreation. He then worked part time for another nonprofit, the Maryland Center for Independent Living, while attending the University of Baltimore to earn his master's degree in public administration.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
A variety of Baltimore neighborhoods ended the roller-coaster ride of the past decade with significantly higher home values than at the start, but some communities saw all the gains of the housing bubble erased by the bust. That's the conclusion of a group of Johns Hopkins University graduate students who analyzed how the turbulent 2000s affected a mix of low-, moderate- and high-income areas in the city. Two recessions, a financial crisis and a housing run-up followed by collapse did not hit every neighborhood equally.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
The Sun and other media outlets around the nation have recently covered claims of plagiarism by U.S. Sen. Rand Paul ("Don't copy, don't tell lies," Nov. 8). While the senator has conceded to prolific plagiarism, at least by some on his staff, the real reason for concern is less with the originality of words the senator claimed as his own than about the ideas expressed. Commenting on the Supreme Court's decision upholding the Affordable Care Act, Senator Paul said, "Just because a couple people on the Supreme Court declare something to be 'constitutional' does not make it so. " I am not sure how the senator defines "a couple," but in the Supreme Court decision he refers to a majority of five justices voted to uphold the health care law enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Rozeana Faulk has lived her whole life in Baltimore's Oliver neighborhood, watching as drug trafficking gripped what was once a solid middle-class community and the area decayed. Now Faulk sees signs of hope in one of the city's most depressed and crime-ridden neighborhoods. Some rowhouses on her block, the 1400 block of N. Bond St., have been vacant for 20 years, but now they're being rehabbed and new families are moving in. Fewer drug dealers hang out on the corners, she said. People are starting to make more of an effort to help their neighbors.
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