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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Magic Johnson may have survived for more than 20 years with HIV and is in apparent good health, but don't let the basketball legend's success story fool you. HIV and AIDS remain scourges in the African-American community, where experts say infection rates are higher than in any other demographic group — and rising fast. On Thursday, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People kicked off a campaign to enlist local pastors and ministers in spreading the word that the HIV-AIDs crisis in their communities is more severe than many realize, and that plenty can be done to help.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
For the second time this week, family and friends of Oscar Torres gathered in public Friday to mourn his death, worrying, they say, that without holding vigils his killing will be forgotten and the person who shot him during a robbery will go free. About 50 people crammed into the front room of the family's rowhouse in Southwest Baltimore, huddled around a memorial of white roses and pictures. They sang and prayed in Spanish before Torres' mother, Ernestina Torres, led the group the few blocks north to where he was killed.
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NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
The Baltimore branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People appears to have elected a city social services officials as its president this week, making Tessa Hill-Aston the first woman to serve in the top local office in almost 30 years. A final tally of votes was not available Wednesday, but early results showed Hill-Aston leading her opponent, former longtime branch president G.I. Johnson, by large margins. Her slate of preferred candidates also looked to have made a clean sweep of positions on the branch's governing body.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Magic Johnson may have survived for more than 20 years with HIV and is in apparent good health, but don't let the basketball legend's success story fool you. HIV and AIDS remain scourges in the African-American community, where experts say infection rates are higher than in any other demographic group — and rising fast. On Thursday, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People kicked off a campaign to enlist local pastors and ministers in spreading the word that the HIV-AIDs crisis in their communities is more severe than many realize, and that plenty can be done to help.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
The Baltimore branch of the NAACP will hold a downtown rally Monday in memory of slain Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. The rally is part of a flurry of action from Maryland churches and civil rights groups seeking to memorialize Martin, the 17-year-old who was unarmed when he was shot and killed Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla., on Feb. 26 by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. "It's a sad, tragic situation," said Baltimore NAACP President Tessa Hill-Aston. "You got a young boy trying to walk away from somebody, drinking a soda and eating candy like any other young person.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
At a meeting to clear the air after the firing of NAACP Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the Baltimore NAACP branch announced last night that it was postponing its annual Unity Banquet partly because of fallout from the controversy.The meeting also featured a surprise appearance by Martha Rivera Chavis, the wife of the ousted NAACP national leader, who said she had been hurt by "misinformation" about her husband. Mrs. Chavis taped much of the meeting at the Baltimore Urban League's Orchard Street headquarters.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | December 31, 1990
Since her childhood growing up near Chesapeake City, Enolia P. McMillan has lived by the work-ethic values she learned helping tend the family farm.There were wood and water to haul, eggs to be collected, and stray livestock to be retrieved -- endless chores in the day-to-day struggle to wrest a livelihood from the earth."
NEWS
November 4, 2000
LARRY YOUNG is right when he says the Baltimore NAACP needs effective leadership. And perhaps he's right when he says the local organization is too passive. But members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's branch also need leadership they can trust. So where does Mr. Young fit in? Mr. Young's colleagues expelled him from the state Senate in 1998 after finding he used his public office for private gain. Even senators who didn't want to boot him concluded he had done something wrong.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
The NAACP has named an administrator to oversee the finances of its struggling Baltimore branch, which owes the national organization more than $60,000.The 3,500-member city branch's debt to the national NAACP, which has headquarters in Baltimore, includes $50,000 in back membership dues and $13,000 in annual assessments, said Rodney A. Orange, branch president.The Baltimore branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has had troubled finances for several years.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
I am now and always have been a strong supporter of citizens on patrol groups. Evidence of this is the fact that I have been on four different community COP walks this year alone. Contrary to misinformation in a letter to the editor published Tuesday ("What's the evidence against Shomrim," Dec. 7), I am not one of those who have called for the Shomrim community patrol to be disbanded. As a past president of two community organizations, I know for certain that we need citizens involved with the safekeeping of our neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
The Baltimore-based NAACP and the pastor of a city mega-church were among those calling Sunday for a federal civil rights case against George Zimmerman after the Florida man was acquitted in the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager. Meanwhile, a crowd numbering between 300 and 400 rallied at Baltimore's Inner Harbor to register frustration and dismay with the late Saturday verdict in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. "It was like it was my child," said Debora Evans, 57, of Baltimore, who attended the rally and choked up when she spoke about the verdict.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
The Baltimore branch of the NAACP will hold a downtown rally Monday in memory of slain Florida teenager Trayvon Martin. The rally is part of a flurry of action from Maryland churches and civil rights groups seeking to memorialize Martin, the 17-year-old who was unarmed when he was shot and killed Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla., on Feb. 26 by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. "It's a sad, tragic situation," said Baltimore NAACP President Tessa Hill-Aston. "You got a young boy trying to walk away from somebody, drinking a soda and eating candy like any other young person.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
I am now and always have been a strong supporter of citizens on patrol groups. Evidence of this is the fact that I have been on four different community COP walks this year alone. Contrary to misinformation in a letter to the editor published Tuesday ("What's the evidence against Shomrim," Dec. 7), I am not one of those who have called for the Shomrim community patrol to be disbanded. As a past president of two community organizations, I know for certain that we need citizens involved with the safekeeping of our neighborhoods.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
When I read the article about the African-American teen being attacked by a member of a Jewish community watch dog group ( "Tension in Park Heights," Dec. 5), I saw it as another incident of crime in the city. I was then astounded to read that the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance was suddenly calling for the "violent fringe group" Shomrim to be disbanded! Was this incident one of many such attacks? Is there any indication that this group are vigilantes, out to get blacks?
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
The Baltimore branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People appears to have elected a city social services officials as its president this week, making Tessa Hill-Aston the first woman to serve in the top local office in almost 30 years. A final tally of votes was not available Wednesday, but early results showed Hill-Aston leading her opponent, former longtime branch president G.I. Johnson, by large margins. Her slate of preferred candidates also looked to have made a clean sweep of positions on the branch's governing body.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
The death of the Rev. Benjamin L. Hooks has touched many area residents who fondly recalled the time the civil rights giant called Baltimore his home. Hooks was instrumental in the NAACP's move from New York to Baltimore in 1986. He served as executive director of the organizations from 1977 to 1992, significantly growing membership and reducing expenses during that time. Hooks died at the age of 85 today in Nashville. "We were probably one of the first national nonprofits to move our headquarters to Baltimore," said J. Howard Henderson, who served as Hooks' vice president of administration.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
When I read the article about the African-American teen being attacked by a member of a Jewish community watch dog group ( "Tension in Park Heights," Dec. 5), I saw it as another incident of crime in the city. I was then astounded to read that the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance was suddenly calling for the "violent fringe group" Shomrim to be disbanded! Was this incident one of many such attacks? Is there any indication that this group are vigilantes, out to get blacks?
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | September 19, 1994
Sinking into an office chair, George N. Buntin Jr. clings to the telephone as a drowning man might grab a life ring. If anyone drowns on this landlocked stretch of West 26th Street, it will be Mr. Buntin -- swamped by the sea of paper on his desk.Dive into that sea, and you'll find -- message by message -- cries to Mr. Buntin, executive director of the Baltimore NAACP, for help: Help me start a business. Help me find a lawyer. Help me get promoted. Help me just by listening because I feel mistreated.
NEWS
November 4, 2000
LARRY YOUNG is right when he says the Baltimore NAACP needs effective leadership. And perhaps he's right when he says the local organization is too passive. But members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's branch also need leadership they can trust. So where does Mr. Young fit in? Mr. Young's colleagues expelled him from the state Senate in 1998 after finding he used his public office for private gain. Even senators who didn't want to boot him concluded he had done something wrong.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2000
When thousands of delegates arrive in Baltimore this weekend for the NAACP's 91st annual convention, they won't be short on reasons to celebrate. Finances for the nation's oldest civil rights organization are stronger than ever, with a $2 million surplus expected for the fifth consecutive year. Membership has climbed to a half-million, and college and youth chapters are sprouting up nationwide. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, founded in 1909, has gained national visibility in the past year by taking on high-profile campaigns against racism in Hollywood, gun makers and the flying of the Confederate flag in South Carolina.
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